Georgia racing to catch up with the idiocy

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Sydde, Mar 14, 2015.

  1. Sydde macrumors 68020

    Sydde

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    #1
    A very extreme version of the "Religious Freedom Restoration Act" is coming up for consideration in the Georgia House. Intended to head off any kind of rights for freaks, weirdos, perverts or wives, it grants extensive exemptions to the laws of the state, as long as one can provide a religious justification for one's actions.

    Of course, it could come back to bite then in the unexpecteds, as "religion" has a very broad, they may inadvertently end up extending special rights to them muslims.
     
  2. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #2
    Oh man. The satanic temple will have a field day with all these new "freedoms". :D
     
  3. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #3
    I hope the Wiccans, Druids, and Satanists place Christmas displays on the lawn of the capital.
     
  4. bradl, Mar 14, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2015

    bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #4
    Don't forget the Rastafarians. Snoop Dogg would love to place a bag of it at the capitol in the name of freedom of religion.

    And don't forget voodoun. They the legislators would absolutely love to see a thoroughly misconceived doll lying on their office desk. ;)

    BL.
     
  5. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #5
    I don't think anything can top this one I read today:

    https://oag.ca.gov/system/files/initiatives/pdfs/15-0008%20(Sodomy)_0.pdf (PDF)

    The "Sodomite Suppression Act":
    But, this is the best part of it:

    So, your idea of "freedom and liberty" is to legally put to death people who perform consensual sexual acts with each other that you don't approve of?

    Nothing to see here...just some religious freedom and tolerance going on.
     
  6. filmbuff macrumors 6502a

    filmbuff

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    #6
    Raise your hand if you read the bill!

    It really doesn't say much at all.
     
  7. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #7

    The Aquarian Tabernacle Church is way ahead of me apparently...
     
  8. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #8
    Heck, Rand Paul might be tempted to open his Church of the Aqua-Buddha.
     
  9. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #9
    Doesn't say much?

    As a little mental exercise, could someone please explain how that makes sense?
     
  10. Thomas Veil macrumors 68020

    Thomas Veil

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    #10
    I think the people who wrote that bill need a little mental exercise.
     
  11. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #11
    You know how you can't make human sacrifices to Quetzalcoatl because of that whole "no murdering people" law?

    ...yeah. :D
     
  12. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #12
    Let's slowly watch our country decline back to the discriminatory fighting hellhole it once was, all in the name of "freedom".
     
  13. Huntn Suspended

    Huntn

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    #13
    The entire notion of "my religion gives me the right" other than worship as I see fit, is the corrupted and most self serving notion of Freedom of Religion. Theists are trying to use it to justify discrimination and trample the rights of others with different beliefs. No surprise it's Christians behind attempts to establish these kinds of laws, where if they can't have a theocracy with theirs as the official religion, believe that their ancient book of fables should take precedence over the well founded laws of the secular government they claim to follow the principles of and owe allegiance too.

    ----------

    Ok so what fringe group submitted that, if it is actually genuine or is this the efforts of one nut?
     
  14. zin macrumors 6502

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    #14
    The good thing from this is that the State of California is now $200 richer as a result of this man's suggestion.
     
  15. iBlazed macrumors 68000

    iBlazed

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    #15
    Funny how it used to be that bigots were crowing about gays wanting "special privileges carved out for them" when they just wanted to marry like everyone else, but now as soon as national gay marriage is becoming a reality the right wing throws a fit and starts carving out special (and perhaps unconstitutional) privileges for religious people. I wish all Americans were this capable of sniffing out hypocrisy...
     
  16. Huntn Suspended

    Huntn

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    #16
    Hypocrisy seems to be part of our DNA. :confused:
     
  17. tgara macrumors 6502a

    tgara

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    #17
    That article you linked to is yellow journalism at its worst. The author, Jay Michelson, should be fired for fraud.

    The text of the proposed Georgia law is essentially identical to the text of the Federal RFRA that was passed in 1993. In what way is it "a very extreme version" of the federal RFRA? You know, the one sponsored by Ted Kennedy and Chuck Schumer? The same one that passed unanimously in the House, 97-0 in the Senate, and signed by President Clinton. Supported by civil libertarians and religious conservatives. Yeah, that one.

    I know a lot of members here hate religion and religious people. That's clear from the vile posts. But in the intervening 23 years since the federal RFRA was passed, not a single instance of any of the hypothetical fringe cases have ever been brought under that law that I'm aware of. What makes you think these cases will be brought and upheld in Georgia?

    ----------

    Maybe our resident constitutional scholar Ruth Bader iBlazed can answer that? Is he out of time-out yet? ;)
     
  18. APlotdevice macrumors 68040

    APlotdevice

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    #18
    As far as the press has been able to discern, it's just one nut who happens to be a licensed attorney.
     
  19. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #19
    Georgia: where religious cannabis is king. (Actually, heck, why stop there? Psychedelics are known as being integral to many religious practices).

    Seriously though, the is the last gasp of the right-wing religious people in the US who are correctly assessing they will be in a minority soon. Both their religion and their politics are being rejected by younger people because they understand just how mean-spirited and selfish the religious right is. Even my evangelical family in the US is getting fed up with the lack of compassion of conservative 'Christians'. They would prefer that their religion be focused on personal journeys and on charity rather than on judging and controlling others.
     
  20. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #20
    Sorry, but most here don't "hate religion and religious people". They hate anyone that would use their religion as a reason to discriminate against others while at the same time referring to themselves as loving, accepting Christians or whatever else. But those same people would cry foul if they were on the receiving end of such discrimination.

    I'm just happy to at least see this in action. You want to discriminate. Sure. Be open about it. Post a sign claiming that you won't serve certain people due to your religion.

    Don't decide that you have the right to be an *****, then expect to not be called an *****.
     
  21. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #21
    I highly doubt that the Federal RFRA states that, "laws neutral toward religion may burden religious exercise as surely as laws intended to interfere with religious exercise".

    That passage essentially threatens secularism.

    But no big, right?
     
  22. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #22
    Oh, certainly the efforts of one nut. But it's still out there.
     
  23. tgara macrumors 6502a

    tgara

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    #23
    Actually, the federal RFRA does in fact state that:

    Since you asked the question with what appears to be genuine interest, I'll help you. A "neutral" law is a law that on it's face doesn't appear to impact religion, but does so in practice. An example would be a law that bans the possession of eagle feathers. This law doesn't appear to impact religion, it applies to everyone everywhere in the jurisdiction, and doesn't even mention religion. But suppose there is a tribe of Indians, for example, that use eagle feathers in a headdress in a religious ceremony. They must possess the eagle feathers for their ceremony, but to do so would cause them to be in violation of the law. If this issue got litigated, and the RFRA was asserted as a defense, the Indians would probably win. The law would have to be amended to insert an exception of some kind, which is what has been done historically.

    BTW, the eagle feather scenario is an actual case that has been going on for over 9 years. No joke.

    http://www.redlakenationnews.com/st...r-but-still-enforces-arbitrary-law/32931.html
     
  24. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    #24
    Well sourced and argued.

    It will be interesting to see how the boundaries get pushed.

    I suspect eagle feathers will be one of the more benign thing religions seek to obtain.
     
  25. kds1, Mar 15, 2015
    Last edited: Mar 15, 2015

    kds1 Suspended

    kds1

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    #25
    There was a case in Florida where practitioners of Santeria won the right to slaughter animals as sacrifices for their "religion". They had been brought up on animal cruelty charges. I thought that was ******** (the fact that they got off).
     

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