Good Kill, a war flick about drone pilots.

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by FieldingMellish, Mar 23, 2015.

  1. FieldingMellish Suspended

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    #1
    Major Thomas Egan (Ethan Hawke) is a vodka guzzling former pilot who laments how the U.S. Air Force has become the "U.S. Chair Force." We follow him in the office and at home as he sinks into depression, indifference and fatigue. The good kill trailer has Ethan Hawke tormented by his position In war. He’s a family man that begins to question the ethics of his job as a drone pilot.

    A Las Vegas-based fighter pilot turned drone pilot fights the Taliban by remote control for 12 hours a day, then goes home to the suburbs and feuds with his wife and kids for the other 12. But the pilot is starting to question the mission. Is he creating more terrorists than he's killing? Is he fighting a war without end?

    On a similar theme, Sean Penn’s star turn as a Sniper opens with a $5,000,000 weekend.
     
  2. sodapop1 Suspended

    sodapop1

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    Is he questioning the ethics of his job as a drone pilot or the war in general?

    Casualties of war are going to occur regardless whether or not we have boots on the ground. I don't see how having our soldiers die on the battlefield makes a war more ethical.
     
  3. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    He pined for the good-old days, when he could fly over and drop bombs that killed people from thousands of feet in the air.

    This new method was so mechanical and impersonal.
     
  4. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/23/u...isorders-much-as-those-in-combat-do.html?_r=0
     
  5. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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  6. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    Can you imagine dreaming of being a fighter jock, working your butt off in high school, getting accepted to the Air Force Academy, earning your wings, and just before graduation reporting to the Colonel who says, “Congratulations Cadet, you’re going to fly drones!”

    The only thing more demoralizing to a newly-minted Air Force officer is getting commissioned as an ICBM Operations Officer.
     
  7. steve knight Suspended

    steve knight

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    "A Taste of Armageddon" is a first-season episode of the original American science fiction television series Star Trek. It was first broadcast on February 23, 1967 and repeated July 20, 1967. It is episode #23, production #23, and is written by Robert Hamner and Gene L. Coon, and directed by Joseph Pevney.

    Set in the 23rd century, the series follows the adventures of Captain James T. Kirk (William Shatner) and the crew of the Federation starship Enterprise. In this episode, the crew of the USS Enterprise visits a planet whose people fight a computer-simulated war against a neighboring planet. Although the war is fought via computer simulation, the citizens of each planet have to submit to real executions inside "disintegration booths" to meet the casualty counts of the simulated attacks. The crew of the Enterprise is caught in the middle and are told to submit themselves voluntarily for execution after being "killed" in an "enemy attack".
     
  8. citizenzen macrumors 65816

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    Can you imagine dreaming of being a cavalryman, working your butt off in high school, getting accepted to the Army, earning your horse, and just before graduation reporting to the Colonel who says, “Congratulations Cadet, you’re going to drive a tank!”

    Stretched example for sure, but time changes ... technologies change ... armies and fighting methods change.

    So for those who had their heart set on riding a horse into battle or flying a jet, the answer is the same, "Get used to it soldier! Now get your ass back in line and do what we tell you to do!!!"
     
  9. aaronvan Suspended

    aaronvan

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    #9
    Clank, clank, here comes a tank.

    I loved my fat tanker buddies (except for their ridiculous boots.) They were pretty smart; they rode--we walked.

    Don't get me going about the Cav, though...:mad:
     
  10. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #10
    A point that badly needs to be made, and very well said.


    I remember watching that episode during a re-run in the 1980s, and thought it very interesting at the time.


    Two somewhat different perspectives………..but very nicely expressed.
     
  11. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    It's "shocking" because the typical narrative belittles the suffering born of war trauma in favor of jingoistic verve. How do you recruit a volunteer army if joining carries a serious risk of mental illness and rhe likelihood of extreme difficulty reintegrating into civil society?
     
  12. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    That's bunk. My dad was drafted into Vietnam and was in therapy for PTSD for 20 years are so. He told me all the time that war sucked and how people died.

    It made no difference. I wanted to serve, and fight. I have zero interest in being a peace time soldier. It Had nothing to do with Rambo or Top Gun. Since the dawn of time men have wanted to fight.

    Or was the appearance of Starbucks and iPhones meant to end those the rush toward the sound of battle?
     
  13. Renzatic Suspended

    Renzatic

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    #13
    The fact is, we all think we're the next George S. Patton until we're getting shot at.
     
  14. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    To a large extent, I find myself in agreement with you.

    In recent times, the very idea of what war entails has become a lot more distant for many of those whose job it is fight it, as technology enables people to put increasing physical and psychological distance between them and what they are fighting, leading to a (perhaps mistaken) belief that they are not really participating in such an endeavour.

    And, I would argue, unrealistic representations of war through computer games does not prepare you properly for the actions of directing drones, (or reactions to same) however similar they may appear to be, and distant you think they are.


    Fair enough, in that it is clear you chose to enter that world of your own volition with a pretty fair idea of what it may have entailed. I suspect that this may not have been the case with a good number of your comrades.
     
  15. Technarchy macrumors 603

    Technarchy

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    Not quite, but I will say the first time you realize someone is aiming and shooting directly at you, and they literally want to kill you, it makes you rethink a lot of you decisions.

    A year later and I could sleep through a mortar attack.
     
  16. Gutwrench macrumors 65816

    Gutwrench

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    meh, mortars are the answer? Ambien and gin hasn't worked so I'll try to get a prescription for mortars. Thx.
     
  17. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #17
    You end up risking nothing to question whether the war is worth it. With all the personnel so safe and secure. A war fought with drone strikes doesn't seem like a war. It seems more like a malevolent god looming overhead striking down those whom are misbehaving.

    Instead it just becomes a matter of money. With how vast the governments resources are. The financial cost becomes insignificant and is just a number in some accountants books that slightly decreases the main number in the books.

    Of course who am I to talk. I'm not the one going out there and risking my butt.
     
  18. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    #18
    The pool of volunteers is, naturally, heterogeneous. You went in with some knowledge of what war trauma can do; others, perhaps not.

    I'm not talking about you, or any individual who joined up. Surely there are many factors that a person weights when deciding to join, and it would surprise me to learn if a recruit didn't consider the risks as they understand them. I'm talking about the carefully moderated narrative that the DoD feeds into our culture in order to encourage some perceptions of war and diminish others.

    Desensitization to violence and depersonalization of war act as aids for recruitment too. Representations of war in computer games is a good example.
     
  19. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    Granted, yes, it is.

    But the problem is that one can be wonderfully immortal (and immune to injury) on a computer game, or be miraculously resurrected should you be unfortunate enough, or insufficiently skilled, to get killed while playing, a mindset that can be a bit of a drawback in the real world where the killing and injuries are for real.
     
  20. mobilehaathi macrumors G3

    mobilehaathi

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    Yes, I think I see what you're saying. The rules of a video game are sufficiently divorced from reality (necessarily "for fun") as to "give the wrong impression."
     
  21. FieldingMellish thread starter Suspended

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    #21
    Maybe drone strikes incurred while sitting down is where the term Armchair Generals come from?

    It then leads one to think that the next manner of attack is to find a way to incur in the enemy some hemorrhoids.
     
  22. decafjava macrumors 68000

    decafjava

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    #22
    Actually the term I believed comes from those playing board games - or those reading about military campaigns who then fancy themselves the next Napoleon or Caesar.

    Might be a good idea as a means of hitting drone pilots. :p
     
  23. lowendlinux Contributor

    lowendlinux

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    #23
    I liked walking I would do anything to stay out of loud slow death traps thank you.
     

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