Good Samaritan targeted, beaten after helping lost toddler

jkcerda

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Jun 10, 2013
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https://www.yahoo.com/gma/good-samaritan-targeted-beaten-helping-lost-toddler-082805037--abc-news-topstories.html
However, he ended up being attacked by the child's father, who admitted to punching him repeatedly, according to ABC affiliate WFTS.

"When I got there, I just swung on him," the father told WFTS. He acknowledged that he really didn't know whether the man was looking to kidnap his daughter but he said he doesn't regret assaulting him.

"You don't pick somebody's kid up in that direction, towards the parking lot, whether you were going towards the parking lot or not," the toddler's father said.
father is in the wrong here, yeah I get you thought he was taking the kid YOU let out of your sight, but not to regret it AFTER finding out he was looking for the family? wrong, dude is lucky the guy did not press charges.
 

Zenithal

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Sep 10, 2009
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Guy is lucky charges were not pressed, hell guy is lucky CPS did not get involved since he lost the kid in the first place.
Doesn't your wife hit you with her sandals?
 
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A.Goldberg

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Jan 31, 2015
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Wow. I suppose it's understandable for a parent to become overly protective of their child, especially in a time of extreme stress (losing the child). The fact the family did not appologize (rather doubled down on criticisms) is ridiculous. Almost as ridiculous as publically smearing the guy who found their child (and perhaps protected him from actually being abducted).

I might forgive the father for beating the crap out of me. But smearing my name is not something I would tolerate.

The world is an interesting place these days.
 

Zenithal

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Sep 10, 2009
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Ever since the kids began walking we don't let them out of our site. Even if it's inside the house. Big house, lots of hiding places.
 

pdqgp

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Mar 23, 2010
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"When I got there, I just swung on him," the father told WFTS. He acknowledged that he really didn't know whether the man was looking to kidnap his daughter but he said he doesn't regret assaulting him.

"You don't pick somebody's kid up in that direction, towards the parking lot, whether you were going towards the parking lot or not," the toddler's father said.
Dude should have knocked the dad in the mouth a few times after the cops showed up and told him that no he doesn't regret it either as you don't let your kids our of your site like that. People like this dad shouldn't be allowed to have kids.
 

VulchR

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Jun 8, 2009
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Given that I currently reside in Scotland, I've been in situations in which I have encountered drunk people who were dangerously intoxicated (falling over and hurting themselves, in danger of hypothermia, or outright passed out) on the street. It's rare but it happens (I live in a University town). Like most people I worry about the reaction of the person I am trying to help or how it might might be perceived by others. Thus, I always call the police first and describe to them the situation as I approach the person. Anybody picking up a stray kid should immediately call the police to them what's going on, just to set the record straight. Still, you'd think the family would apologise to the Samaritan publicly if they misunderstood his intentions.
 
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daflake

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Given that I currently reside in Scotland, I've been in situations in which I have encountered drunk people who were dangerously intoxicated (falling over and hurting themselves, in danger of hypothermia, or outright passed out) on the street. It's rare but it happens (I live in a University town). Like most people I worry about the reaction of the person I am trying to help or how it might might be perceived by others. Thus, I always call the police first and described to them the situation as I approach the person. Anybody picking up a stray kid should immediately call the police to them what's going on, just to set the record straight. Still, you'd think the family would apologise to the Samaritan publicly if they misunderstood his intentions.
used to be that you didn't have to do that. It was easy enough to just help the child find their parents. Now, they beat and call you a molester for just glancing that direction. Humanity sucks.
 
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BeeGood

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Sep 15, 2013
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Given that I currently reside in Scotland, I've been in situations in which I have encountered drunk people who were dangerously intoxicated (falling over and hurting themselves, in danger of hypothermia, or outright passed out) on the street. It's rare but it happens (I live in a University town). Like most people I worry about the reaction of the person I am trying to help or how it might might be perceived by others. Thus, I always call the police first and described to them the situation as I approach the person. Anybody picking up a stray kid should immediately call the police to them what's going on, just to set the record straight. Still, you'd think the family would apologise to the Samaritan publicly if they misunderstood his intentions.
The bolded part above just makes me sad. I'm not saying you're wrong, but the idea that we have to engage law enforcement while we assist another human being just makes me feel like we are all socially broken.

It's like we're all better off if we mind our own business. If we could measure aggregate isolation, I'm certain we would be the most isolated people in human history.
 
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VulchR

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The bolded part above just makes me sad. I'm not saying you're wrong, but the idea that we have to engage law enforcement while we assist another human being just makes me feel like we are all socially broken.
In my experience it takes a few seconds, they usually just note the call in their logs, and if they're concerned they stay on the phone while the person is approached. I have to say that I have offered help three times to drunken people in my town over the last year, and it always turned out OK (at least in the short term).
 
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samiwas

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Aug 26, 2006
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2 yo shouldn't be unsupervised, should be charging the parents with neglect.
I spend a lot of time at kids' play-places. It doesn't shock me at all any more how little attention some people pay to their kids. At least weekly I have to stop a small toddler from climbing a play structure designed for much bigger kids while the parents are either staring at their phones, or talking about BS with other parents.
 
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