Have you converted your home to LED lighting yet?

senseless

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Apr 23, 2008
1,762
152
Pennsylvania, USA
Will the ban on common incandescent lightbulbs will finally convince people to switch to LED lighting? These lights are incredibly efficient and will save a ton of energy. This is the single easiest way to help the environment.
 

Aspasia

macrumors 65816
I use LEDs for economic reasons, albeit the bulbs are quite expensive.

My normal monthly electric use runs about $20-25 a month (I heat with wood in the winter, so there's no costs associated with running a furnace).

However, my electricity is supplied by a co-op electric company which charges $38 a month simply for the dubious distinction of being the only game in town, then adds my actual electric use, plus all the taxes, to the bill.

Sometimes I dream about a private wind turbine...
 

Nismo73

macrumors 6502a
Jan 4, 2013
854
426
I was willing to pay the added cost for some of the new CREE bulbs at HD. Pocket is a little lighter from the cost, but feel better not going through all those watts when you pay one of the highest rates in the country.

Also, a few I replaced were in the basement where I have to hand-turn the bulb on and off - that gets pretty hot to touch with the incandescents, but only slightly warm with the LEDs, and it's kind of rubbery feeling.

Glad LED technology has been made widely available since I'm now convinced compact fluorescents suck!
 

Ugg

macrumors 68000
Apr 7, 2003
1,985
15
Penryn
I live in Central California. My electricity bill averages about $15 a month except for december, January and February when it's around $40. I have all cfl bulbs. I would be hard pressed to justify buying leds, although I do have two led table lamps and one led floor lamp.
 

senseless

macrumors 68000
Original poster
Apr 23, 2008
1,762
152
Pennsylvania, USA
I was willing to pay the added cost for some of the new CREE bulbs at HD. Pocket is a little lighter from the cost, but feel better not going through all those watts when you pay one of the highest rates in the country.

Also, a few I replaced were in the basement where I have to hand-turn the bulb on and off - that gets pretty hot to touch with the incandescents, but only slightly warm with the LEDs, and it's kind of rubbery feeling.

Glad LED technology has been made widely available since I'm now convinced compact fluorescents suck!
I don't like CFLs anymore, either. I've several fail quickly and they tend to dim out or turn purple over time. I replaced a 40 watt porch light with an LED bulb and it only draws 2 watts!
 

4JNA

macrumors 68000
Feb 8, 2006
1,505
1
looking for trash files
bye bye twisty bulbs.

made the switch about a year ago. yanked all the CFL stuff out and went all LED.

thing that finally made me jump was they got the 'soft white' color right. when i had a CFL and LED in the same fixture and couldn't tell the difference, i went all in. the upside has been the instant on, no more 'warming up' to get to full brightness. donated all the working CFL stuff to family and friends who were still using incandescent stuff, recycled the rest.

i just geek out thinking about it, i can light every light in my home (wattage wise) for less than 2 indoor can spots and 2 outdoor security spots that they originally replaced. amazing stuff.

i also had lots of 'early' failures using CFL, much different than the package numbers anyway... about a year in with all LED and so far so good. had one that was 'noisy' and they exchanged it for another no questions.

want to add solar panels at some point, just waiting for the 'installed' cost to drop and my mortgage to go away. :)
 
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jnpy!$4g3cwk

macrumors 65816
Feb 11, 2010
1,100
1,293
Will the ban on common incandescent lightbulbs will finally convince people to switch to LED lighting? These lights are incredibly efficient and will save a ton of energy. This is the single easiest way to help the environment.
I would like to, but my budget won't allow it at the moment, and, I have almost all CFLs, so, I'm not doing too badly with lighting consumption.
 

shinji

macrumors 65816
Mar 18, 2007
1,297
1,497
I switched to CFL a while ago and gradually replaced with LED. Home Depot always has some kind of deal going on for them.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,667
1,738
i just geek out thinking about it, i can light every light in my home (wattage wise) for less than 2 indoor can spots and 2 outdoor security spots that they originally replaced. amazing stuff.
That's really awesome. CFLs also used a certain amount of mercury. I can't find anything to corroborate its use in LEDs.
 

juanm

macrumors 68000
May 1, 2006
1,565
2,880
Fury 161
My flat had a total of 48 50W halogens when I moved in two years ago (basically everywhere except for the kitchen). One week after that, all the ceiling lamps were LED (not fancy ones, just cheap ones, something like 3 for 8€). Except for a bad batch I got at the beginning, they are all still perfectly functional. We still have a few CFL in small lights, but mostly it's everything LED
 

MorphingDragon

macrumors 603
Mar 27, 2009
5,160
5
The World Inbetween
I live in a room that has been properly converted to LED, tracks run around the edge of the room and there's even a big fat controller by the door.

Main complaint is the controller is balls but that's not really a fault of LED's themselves. Requires cooling in use so a really loud fan needs to spin up now and then. The dimming feature is useless as PWM control means that the light flicker at anything less than max.

The pros is that the room is lit really well and uniformly. The light also feels really still as there's no flicker or anything like that.
 

Arran

macrumors 601
Mar 7, 2008
4,353
2,725
Atlanta, USA
My house is pretty much converted to led, inside and out.

My flat had a total of 48 50W halogens...
Do you mean low voltage MR16s? I used to have a ton of those in 20w

Ever since leds appeared a few years back, I tried many different bulbs but was disappointed with the color or quality of the light. The best so far is sold by IKEA. Their Ledare mr16 is around $7-8 each. I now have a dozen of them illuminating my kitchen and the light quality is very similar to the halogens I removed. I liked them enough to bulk-buy and put them elsewhere too. Haven't done that with any other led mr16. Only prob is they're not dimmable and only come in one beam angle.

They run at about 3 watts each, so now my A/C only has to remove 36 watts of heat in the summer as opposed to 240 watts. :)

I also have and can recommend these. They both have a useful range of dimmability without flicker. An electronic dimmer seems to help:
 

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elistan

macrumors 6502a
Jun 30, 2007
979
441
Denver/Boulder, CO
We recently bought a house that had all CFLs. We don't like the CFLs (they're not the dimmable kind, and they take some time to reach full brightness,) so we're slowly replacing them with LEDs bit by bit.
 

zhenya

macrumors 603
Jan 6, 2005
6,353
2,813
We had been all CFL for years, but when the prices started falling and the quality got really good, I switched over about 90% of the house to LED over the last couple of years because we were finally able to get a consistent light color, good dimming, and no warm-up time from low power bulbs. Haven't had any failures yet, so hopefully we are done buying bulbs for many years to come!
 

Technarchy

macrumors 604
May 21, 2012
6,747
4,885
Lights blow out, I go to walmart to get new bulbs and buy whatever is cheapest.

That's how much thought I give this.
 

vrDrew

macrumors 65816
Jan 31, 2010
1,317
11,830
Midlife, Midwest
Lights blow out, I go to walmart to get new bulbs and buy whatever is cheapest.

That's how much thought I give this.
LED bulbs don't blow out. (Or at least, they only blow out every twenty years or so...)

I got a dozen Cree LEDs from Home Depot over a year ago - and I haven't replaced a lightbulb since. And my electric bills have dropped significantly.

If you really "don't want to think about light bulbs" - get some LEDs, and you won't have to, ever again.
 

juanm

macrumors 68000
May 1, 2006
1,565
2,880
Fury 161
My house is pretty much converted to led, inside and out.



Do you mean low voltage MR16s? I used to have a ton of those in 20w
Yes, MR16 in GU10 and 50W. Good light, but very hot and power hogs... I'm more than happy with the small trade-off in light quality/wattage.
 

Tomorrow

macrumors 604
Mar 2, 2008
7,114
1,245
Always a day away
LED bulbs don't blow out. (Or at least, they only blow out every twenty years or so...)
I've bought two LED's for the house. One burned up after about six weeks. The second (its replacement) lasted about four weeks. I replaced that one with an incandescent. It lasted three years, in the same fixture.
 

VulchR

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2009
2,327
10,226
Scotland
I live in the UK, where the new law does not apply, and I have been converting to LED's as my old bulbs wear out. I tend to treat my place as a place where I sleep rather than live (I work, or go hillwalking), so I do not care about whether the light looks nice. I did care about the hassle of replacing the halogen lights I used to have that used to fail after a few months...
 

MacNut

macrumors Core
Jan 4, 2002
21,537
7,787
CT
Isn't there a issue with LED's giving off RF that is causing interference. I wonder how much of an issue this will become in 10 years.
 

vrDrew

macrumors 65816
Jan 31, 2010
1,317
11,830
Midlife, Midwest
I use the little spiral florescents. When the price becomes competitive I'll be happy to switch.
You'll be waiting a long time.

I doubt that screw-in LED light bulbs will ever reach price-parity with Compact Fluorescents, let alone incandescents. An LED bulb is many, many times more complicated, comprising dozens of individual diodes and very complex circuitry that takes 120V alternating current and turns it into low-voltage DC.

You may in time see the per-bulb cost of a 60W equivalent LED come down to the $5-6 range. But its never, ever going to get to sub-$1 territory most people associate with lightbulb pricing.

Where LEDs come into their own is slashing your energy bills, and pretty much eliminating the need to ever have to change a blown lightbulb again.