Hawaii just became the first US state to pass a bill supporting basic income —

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 10, 2013
682
39,000
Criminal Mexi Midget
here's the man behind
Hawaii made waves in June when it passed the first piece of legislation aimed at exploring a niche but growing form of wealth distribution.

The bill, HCR 89, directs the government "to convene a basic economic security working group," a request that can be seen as the first tangible step toward a US basic income program.

People who receive basic income get a fixed amount of money that they can use however they want.
https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/hawaii-just-became-first-us-185000124.html
how many one way tickets to Hawaii after this??
:p
 

Fancuku

macrumors 65816
Oct 8, 2015
1,009
2,540
PA, USA
Hawaii is a unique situation. Everything there is incredibly expensive. Even the most basic things. The natives are very poor and can't afford much.
I am surprised that it took so long to get something like this passed. It will be interesting to see how it goes.
 

Chew Toy McCoy

macrumors regular
May 13, 2016
202
2,835
I think Hawaii is in a unique position that wouldn’t apply to other states. Doing zero research on my end I’m willing to bet the majority of their economy is tourism and as a fairly isolated distant island state it would be highly cost prohibitive to put any serious growth industries there. So I have no idea what residents are supposed to do there for a living. At the same time you probably have the rich driving up property value for their second (or more) homes they only vacation at.
 

rjohnstone

macrumors 68040
Dec 28, 2007
3,483
3,399
PHX, AZ.
What the holy ****?

Lee said he became intrigued by the idea of paying people a salary just for being alive.
Where are the funds coming from to support this? Given the cost of living in Hawaii is on the high side, the tax dollars needed to support such an idea would be on the insane side.
Then you will have to deal with those who will choose to not enter the workforce because the state will take care of them regardless.

These types of policies only work in social democracies with economic policies geared towards state control of basic utilities and services. Capitalistic ideas can still operate under these conditions, but in very limited form.
Basically speaking, Hawaii would become a welfare state.
it would also chase away any future investment in the state from corporations.
 

chagla

macrumors 6502a
Mar 21, 2008
793
1,006
Finland is already doing it experimentally. What's wrong with elevating overall society? Not everyone is created equally, not everyone has same capabilities. It varies. Some extremely rich people didn't "work hard" for it. Maybe they inherited it, maybe they made their money work hard, some don't have any skills yet own millions of dollars and so on. Many have have and works hard yet struggles. I am not saying there shouldn't be rich people or that their wealth should be taken forcefully and distributed to others. If the top 1% contributes slightly more, or if the government takes a more fairer approach (instead of cutting tax for already uber wealthy folks, giving little to nothing to lower/middle class), we can have a much better society. There will be few taking advantage of the system but overall it will benefit whole society. What's bad about that?

THis mentality of, work hard = become rich, or if you don't work = you die is fundamentally flawed, wrong on many levels.

Who is a bigger thief? One that steals $5 bread or one that evades his tax dues of thousands or millions of dollars?

In other words, other poor people are poor because they make bad choices – but if I’m poor, it’s because of an unfair system. As a result of this phenomenon, Pimpare says, poor people tend to be hardest on each other.
Full article -
Why do we think poor people are poor because of their own bad choices?
 

diamond.g

macrumors 603
Mar 20, 2007
6,361
311
Virginia
What the holy ****?


Where are the funds coming from to support this? Given the cost of living in Hawaii is on the high side, the tax dollars needed to support such an idea would be on the insane side.
Then you will have to deal with those who will choose to not enter the workforce because the state will take care of them regardless.

These types of policies only work in social democracies with economic policies geared towards state control of basic utilities and services. Capitalistic ideas can still operate under these conditions, but in very limited form.
Basically speaking, Hawaii would become a welfare state.
it would also chase away any future investment in the state from corporations.
US and Japanese tourism would help pay for it I am sure. Everything on Maui and Oahu is crazy expensive. The big island and Kauai aren't that bad, but don't get as much tourist traffic.


As an aside if there was anywhere you would want to be homeless Hawaii is pretty high on the list as far as weather is concerned...
 

JayMysterio

macrumors 6502a
Apr 24, 2010
667
12,051
Rock Ridge, California
Hawaii is a unique situation. Everything there is incredibly expensive. Even the most basic things. The natives are very poor and can't afford much.
I am surprised that it took so long to get something like this passed. It will be interesting to see how it goes.
Yes it's expensive since everything has to be 'shipped' in. So it adds to the costs of most things. Also remember Honolulu at least has a large homeless population because the environment makes it a little more possible. Seeing makeshift camps on beaches isn't uncommon, which leads to police chasing them off, for people who are allowed to camp.

It isn't so much a 'native' thing though as it's anyone living in Honolulu who couldn't keep pace.

I say this because I know a few of the 'natives' o_O via extended family, and they are very good about taking care of their own no matter what.
 

mollyc

macrumors 68020
Aug 18, 2016
2,124
9,819
We've been to Oahu twice, and I've often wondered how the homeless can even afford to get there in the first place. I assume some might be military from the local bases, but certainly not all of them.
 
  • Like
Reactions: darksithpro

Rhonindk

macrumors 68040
Oct 3, 2014
3,766
7,351
watching the birth of the Dem WTH Party
I think Hawaii is in a unique position that wouldn’t apply to other states. Doing zero research on my end I’m willing to bet the majority of their economy is tourism and as a fairly isolated distant island state it would be highly cost prohibitive to put any serious growth industries there. So I have no idea what residents are supposed to do there for a living. At the same time you probably have the rich driving up property value for their second (or more) homes they only vacation at.
Tourism and military. Significant influx of military money.
http://www.cochawaii.org/military-impact-in-hawaii/
 
  • Like
Reactions: Chew Toy McCoy

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,474
8,051
Somewhere
We've been to Oahu twice, and I've often wondered how the homeless can even afford to get there in the first place. I assume some might be military from the local bases, but certainly not all of them.
Probably some got out of the military, others may have seen their money running out and gone there for the weather and now can't afford to leave. But I would guess the majority of them were born there or living there before their luck ran out and something put them out on the street.
 

eltoslightfoot

macrumors 6502a
Feb 25, 2011
650
792
So, you pay taxes, then the government turns around and gives you some of it back? :confused:

Why not just give everyone a reduction in their taxes and be done with it?
Actually, due to deadweight loss, the reduction in taxes would result in greater advantage.