Here’s to hoping Apple's OLED color isn’t wacky like Samsung's.

mcdj

macrumors G3
Original poster
Jul 10, 2007
8,859
3,722
NYC
I can spot a Galaxy phone from across the room by its screen's weird hyper saturated colors and cyan/green cast, especially when looked at from an angle. As a photo retoucher by trade, that crazy cyan color has always been one of the many turnoffs of a Samsung smart phone for me.

Here’s to hope hoping Apple's come up with a more natural presentation of color for their OLEDs.
 

Nilhum

macrumors regular
Dec 20, 2016
199
270
You can change Samsung’s color presets to SRBG. It’s been there for a while. At least Samsung gives you an option, unlike Apple. I like saturation as it looks better. It’s not like Apple will allow you to have that option.
 

jamesrick80

macrumors 68020
Sep 12, 2014
2,496
2,091
Please read and learn......

Multiple Screen Modes and Color Management

One very important capability of the Galaxy Smartphones that is often overlooked by many consumers and reviewers, is the set of user selectable Screen Modes that are available under Display Settings, which we cover and measure each one in detail below. Most Smartphones and Tablets only provide a single fixed factory display Color Gamut and color calibration, with no way for the user to alter it based on content, personal preferences, running applications, or Ambient Light levels. A very important capability provided by the OLED Galaxy Smartphones is the implementation of Color Management that provides a number of user selectable Screen Modes, each with different Color Gamuts and levels of Color Saturation and display calibration based on user and application preferences. Color Management with multiple and varying Color Gamuts are a very useful and important state-of-the-art capability that all manufacturers will need to provide in the future.

Figure for an explanation and visual definition of JNCD and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots showing the measured Color Errors for the 41 Reference Colors for each Color Gamut.


In order to see the high Color Accuracy, the Display Setting for the Screen Mode needs to match the Color Gamut for the content that is being viewed. All of the reviewers that continue to rant about the poor Color Accuracy of the Galaxy OLED displays have failed to set the proper Screen Mode for their content, which is very accurate as shown in our extensive Lab Measurements and Viewing Tests.


For all of the calibrated Screen Modes, the Galaxy Note8 has uniformly Very Good to Excellent Absolute Color Accuracy, which are covered and measured individually below. See our detailed Absolute Color Accuracy Plots with 41 Reference Colors for the 3 calibrated Screen Modes and also this regarding Bogus Color Accuracy Measurements.



New Four Selectable Screen Modes and Color Gamuts

The Galaxy Note8 has four user selectable Screen Modes: Adaptive Display, AMOLED Cinema, AMOLED Photo, and the Basic Screen Mode, which matches the Standard sRGB / Rec.709 Color Gamut that is used for producing most current consumer content. See this Figure for the Color Gamuts of all the tested Screen Modes and the Colors and Intensities section for the measurements and details. Note that the Adaptive Display screen mode is the standard and factory default Screen Mode. Use Display Settings to switch between the other available Screen Modes. We discuss each of the four tested Screen Modes next…











Color Gamuts

Click to Enlarge


Color Accuracy

Click to Enlarge

Figure. The larger DCI-P3 Color Gamut and wider range of more saturated colors are also useful in many advanced imaging applications, including HDR High Dynamic Range (below).


The measured Color Gamut of the AMOLED Cinema screen mode is a very accurate 104 percent of the Standard DCI-P3 Color Gamut, and the measured Absolute Color Accuracy is a very accurate 3.4 JNCD, which is very likely considerably better than your living room 4K Ultra HD TV. The Galaxy Note8 is one of the first displays to reach full 100% of the DCI-P3 as the result of using a new high saturation “Deep Red” OLED. See the Color Accuracysection and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots for the measurements and details. Select the AMOLED Cinema screen mode using Display Settings – it is not the default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

Color Accuracy section and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots for the measurements and details. Select the AMOLED Photo screen mode using Display Settings – it is not the default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

Color Accuracy section and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots for the measurements and details. Select the Basic screen mode using Display Settings – it is not the default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

Color Accuracysection for the measurements and details. Select the Adaptive Display screen mode using Display Settings – it is the factory default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

White Point for the Adaptive Display screen mode has an intentionally bluish 7,582 K Color Temperature. A new feature on the Galaxy Note8 is a user adjustable White Point with Color Balance slider controls that allow users to change color of White for the Adaptive Display screen mode. The slider controls allow the White Point Color Temperature to range from 6,800 K, which is close to the Standard D65 White, up to 8,800 K, which has a strong bluish tint that some people like. So with the Galaxy Note8 you can set the Color of White that you prefer.

Figure shows the measured decrease in two Color Gamuts with increasing Ambient Light, from 0 lux, which is perfectly dark, up through 2,000 lux, which corresponds to typical outdoor daylight in shade.


At 500 lux, which corresponds to typical office lighting, the measured on-screen Color Gamut for the Basic screen mode falls to 91%. At 1,000 lux, which corresponds to very bright indoor lighting or outdoor daylight with an overcast sky, the measured on-screen Color Gamut falls to 78%, and at 2,000 lux the measured on-screen Color Gamut falls to 61%. This loss of color saturation and wash out in Ambient Light is well known to all display users.


The way to improve the display color accuracy and performance in Ambient Light is to start with a larger Color Gamut, like the Adaptive Display screen mode, which is shown on the right in this Figure compared to the Basic screen mode on the left. At 1,000 lux the Adaptive Display screen mode provides a much better match to the sRGB / Rec.709 Color Gamut than the Basic screen mode. The Adaptive Display screen mode also provides a good match to the DCI-P3 Color Gamut at 500 lux. So the Adaptive Display screen mode provides more accurate on-screen colors in moderate to high Ambient Lighting than the other calibrated Screen Modes, which are designed and calibrated for Low Ambient Light. Applying Dynamic Color Management based on the current Ambient Light lux level in the future will able to further improve color accuracy over a wide range of Ambient Light levels, which we discuss further in the Conclusion.

http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_Note8_ShootOut_100.htm

Too bad Apple won't give you these options..........:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

Furthermore,

· 4 Color Gamuts and 3 Calibrated Screen Modes with High Absolute Color Accuracy based on our extensive Lab Measurements.


· A new larger full 100% DCI-P3 Color Gamut and Digital Cinema mode that is also used for 4K Ultra HD TVs, so the Galaxy Note8 can display the latest high-end 4K video content. The DCI-P3 Gamut is 26 percent larger than the Rec.709 Gamut that is used in 2K Full HD TVs.


· The Galaxy Note8 is certified by the UHD Alliance for Mobile HDR Premium, which allows the Galaxy Note8 to play the same 4K High Dynamic Range content produced for 4K UHD Premium TVs.


· A larger Native Color Gamut with a new high saturation “Deep Red” OLED, resulting in a very impressive 112% of DCI-P3 and 141% of sRGB / Rec.709 Gamuts that also provides much better on-screen Colors in High Ambient Light.


· A 3K Higher Resolution 2960 x 1440 Quad HD+ display with 521 pixels per inch, and Diamond Pixels with Sub-Pixel Rendering.


· A Video Enhancer that provides HDR-like Expanded Dynamic Range for all videos that don’t have HDR coding.


· A record high Peak Display Brightness of over 1,200 nits, which improves screen visibility in very high Ambient Light, and provides the high screen Brightness needed for HDR.


· Front and back Dual Ambient Light Sensors for significantly improved Automatic Brightness settings.


· A Night Mode with a Blue Light Filter that allows the user to adjust and reduce the amount of blue light from the display for better night viewing and improved sleep.


· A user Adjustable White Point with Color Balance slider controls that can change the color of White for the Adaptive Display screen mode.


· An Always On Display mode and Personalized Auto Brightness Control.


· Small Color Shifts and Brightness Shifts with Viewing Angle.


· The Galaxy Note8 can be used with Polarized Sunglasses in both the Portrait and Landscape orientations unlike LCDs, which generally work in only one of the two orientations.


· A new and even stronger curved Gorilla Glass 5 protecting the display.

Native Color Gamut (112% DCI-P3 and 141% sRGB / Rec.709).


· Highest Peak Display Brightness (1,240 nits).


· Highest Contrast Rating in Ambient Light (270).


· Highest Screen Resolution 3K (2960x1440).


· Highest Contrast Ratio (Infinite).


· Lowest Screen Reflectance (4.6 percent).


· Smallest Brightness Variation with Viewing Angle (29 percent).
 
Last edited:

acorntoy

macrumors 65816
May 25, 2010
1,355
1,120
Manual management of color profiles based on content isn’t state of the art. Lol.

What’s state of the art is displaying the correct mode AUTOMATICALLY, based on content, which is what Apple devices do.
Pretty much says it all. I don't want to have to be picking through color profiles to make it work, it should do it itself.
 

flat five

macrumors 603
Feb 6, 2007
5,568
2,589
newyorkcity
Please read and learn......
i think if i was curious about a visual quality of an object... and i went to a certain website..
that looked like this:

Screen Shot 2017-10-22 at 11.36.41 PM.png

...i wouldn't read it because they're definitely not concerned with visuals in the way i was curious about


------
edit
and hey, i'm mostly joking but not really :)
but, i'm joking on the site, not you jamesrick..
 

iSayBoourns

Suspended
Sep 15, 2017
679
767
Please read and learn......

Multiple Screen Modes and Color Management

One very important capability of the Galaxy Smartphones that is often overlooked by many consumers and reviewers, is the set of user selectable Screen Modes that are available under Display Settings, which we cover and measure each one in detail below. Most Smartphones and Tablets only provide a single fixed factory display Color Gamut and color calibration, with no way for the user to alter it based on content, personal preferences, running applications, or Ambient Light levels. A very important capability provided by the OLED Galaxy Smartphones is the implementation of Color Management that provides a number of user selectable Screen Modes, each with different Color Gamuts and levels of Color Saturation and display calibration based on user and application preferences. Color Management with multiple and varying Color Gamuts are a very useful and important state-of-the-art capability that all manufacturers will need to provide in the future.

Figure for an explanation and visual definition of JNCD and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots showing the measured Color Errors for the 41 Reference Colors for each Color Gamut.


In order to see the high Color Accuracy, the Display Setting for the Screen Mode needs to match the Color Gamut for the content that is being viewed. All of the reviewers that continue to rant about the poor Color Accuracy of the Galaxy OLED displays have failed to set the proper Screen Mode for their content, which is very accurate as shown in our extensive Lab Measurements and Viewing Tests.


For all of the calibrated Screen Modes, the Galaxy Note8 has uniformly Very Good to Excellent Absolute Color Accuracy, which are covered and measured individually below. See our detailed Absolute Color Accuracy Plots with 41 Reference Colors for the 3 calibrated Screen Modes and also this regarding Bogus Color Accuracy Measurements.



New Four Selectable Screen Modes and Color Gamuts

The Galaxy Note8 has four user selectable Screen Modes: Adaptive Display, AMOLED Cinema, AMOLED Photo, and the Basic Screen Mode, which matches the Standard sRGB / Rec.709 Color Gamut that is used for producing most current consumer content. See this Figure for the Color Gamuts of all the tested Screen Modes and the Colors and Intensities section for the measurements and details. Note that the Adaptive Display screen mode is the standard and factory default Screen Mode. Use Display Settings to switch between the other available Screen Modes. We discuss each of the four tested Screen Modes next…











Color Gamuts

Click to Enlarge


Color Accuracy

Click to Enlarge

Figure. The larger DCI-P3 Color Gamut and wider range of more saturated colors are also useful in many advanced imaging applications, including HDR High Dynamic Range (below).


The measured Color Gamut of the AMOLED Cinema screen mode is a very accurate 104 percent of the Standard DCI-P3 Color Gamut, and the measured Absolute Color Accuracy is a very accurate 3.4 JNCD, which is very likely considerably better than your living room 4K Ultra HD TV. The Galaxy Note8 is one of the first displays to reach full 100% of the DCI-P3 as the result of using a new high saturation “Deep Red” OLED. See the Color Accuracysection and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots for the measurements and details. Select the AMOLED Cinema screen mode using Display Settings – it is not the default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

Color Accuracy section and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots for the measurements and details. Select the AMOLED Photo screen mode using Display Settings – it is not the default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

Color Accuracy section and the detailed Color Accuracy Plots for the measurements and details. Select the Basic screen mode using Display Settings – it is not the default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

Color Accuracysection for the measurements and details. Select the Adaptive Display screen mode using Display Settings – it is the factory default screen mode for the Galaxy Note8.

White Point for the Adaptive Display screen mode has an intentionally bluish 7,582 K Color Temperature. A new feature on the Galaxy Note8 is a user adjustable White Point with Color Balance slider controls that allow users to change color of White for the Adaptive Display screen mode. The slider controls allow the White Point Color Temperature to range from 6,800 K, which is close to the Standard D65 White, up to 8,800 K, which has a strong bluish tint that some people like. So with the Galaxy Note8 you can set the Color of White that you prefer.

Figure shows the measured decrease in two Color Gamuts with increasing Ambient Light, from 0 lux, which is perfectly dark, up through 2,000 lux, which corresponds to typical outdoor daylight in shade.


At 500 lux, which corresponds to typical office lighting, the measured on-screen Color Gamut for the Basic screen mode falls to 91%. At 1,000 lux, which corresponds to very bright indoor lighting or outdoor daylight with an overcast sky, the measured on-screen Color Gamut falls to 78%, and at 2,000 lux the measured on-screen Color Gamut falls to 61%. This loss of color saturation and wash out in Ambient Light is well known to all display users.


The way to improve the display color accuracy and performance in Ambient Light is to start with a larger Color Gamut, like the Adaptive Display screen mode, which is shown on the right in this Figure compared to the Basic screen mode on the left. At 1,000 lux the Adaptive Display screen mode provides a much better match to the sRGB / Rec.709 Color Gamut than the Basic screen mode. The Adaptive Display screen mode also provides a good match to the DCI-P3 Color Gamut at 500 lux. So the Adaptive Display screen mode provides more accurate on-screen colors in moderate to high Ambient Lighting than the other calibrated Screen Modes, which are designed and calibrated for Low Ambient Light. Applying Dynamic Color Management based on the current Ambient Light lux level in the future will able to further improve color accuracy over a wide range of Ambient Light levels, which we discuss further in the Conclusion.

http://www.displaymate.com/Galaxy_Note8_ShootOut_100.htm

Too bad Apple won't give you these options..........:rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

Furthermore,

· 4 Color Gamuts and 3 Calibrated Screen Modes with High Absolute Color Accuracy based on our extensive Lab Measurements.


· A new larger full 100% DCI-P3 Color Gamut and Digital Cinema mode that is also used for 4K Ultra HD TVs, so the Galaxy Note8 can display the latest high-end 4K video content. The DCI-P3 Gamut is 26 percent larger than the Rec.709 Gamut that is used in 2K Full HD TVs.


· The Galaxy Note8 is certified by the UHD Alliance for Mobile HDR Premium, which allows the Galaxy Note8 to play the same 4K High Dynamic Range content produced for 4K UHD Premium TVs.


· A larger Native Color Gamut with a new high saturation “Deep Red” OLED, resulting in a very impressive 112% of DCI-P3 and 141% of sRGB / Rec.709 Gamuts that also provides much better on-screen Colors in High Ambient Light.


· A 3K Higher Resolution 2960 x 1440 Quad HD+ display with 521 pixels per inch, and Diamond Pixels with Sub-Pixel Rendering.


· A Video Enhancer that provides HDR-like Expanded Dynamic Range for all videos that don’t have HDR coding.


· A record high Peak Display Brightness of over 1,200 nits, which improves screen visibility in very high Ambient Light, and provides the high screen Brightness needed for HDR.


· Front and back Dual Ambient Light Sensors for significantly improved Automatic Brightness settings.


· A Night Mode with a Blue Light Filter that allows the user to adjust and reduce the amount of blue light from the display for better night viewing and improved sleep.


· A user Adjustable White Point with Color Balance slider controls that can change the color of White for the Adaptive Display screen mode.


· An Always On Display mode and Personalized Auto Brightness Control.


· Small Color Shifts and Brightness Shifts with Viewing Angle.


· The Galaxy Note8 can be used with Polarized Sunglasses in both the Portrait and Landscape orientations unlike LCDs, which generally work in only one of the two orientations.


· A new and even stronger curved Gorilla Glass 5 protecting the display.

Native Color Gamut (112% DCI-P3 and 141% sRGB / Rec.709).


· Highest Peak Display Brightness (1,240 nits).


· Highest Contrast Rating in Ambient Light (270).


· Highest Screen Resolution 3K (2960x1440).


· Highest Contrast Ratio (Infinite).


· Lowest Screen Reflectance (4.6 percent).


· Smallest Brightness Variation with Viewing Angle (29 percent).
That’s a whole lot of wall of text to say Samsung hides “better”
Colour management in the settings and defaults to crap (generally what Samsung does, defaults to crap, because they are crap)

I’ll keep my iPhone X that will likely have better and more accurate colour management as default without having to dig into settings.

“But samsung makes the X’s screen!!!” So, that means nothing. It’s still designed and built to Apple’s spec, Samsung just manufacturers it.
 

magbarn

macrumors 68000
Oct 25, 2008
1,916
1,084
You can change Samsung’s color presets to SRBG. It’s been there for a while. At least Samsung gives you an option, unlike Apple. I like saturation as it looks better. It’s not like Apple will allow you to have that option.
Won't get rid of the off-axis cyan green cast. That's endemic to Samsung OLEDs, which apparently is the sole supplier for the X. I greatly prefer the slight dimming IPS LCD's give you over the crappy color shift on off-angle viewing on OLEDs.
 
  • Like
Reactions: osx86

iSayBoourns

Suspended
Sep 15, 2017
679
767
Apple screen is top notch and is known for its superb yellowish tint and washout colors.
What you call “washed out colors” most the industry calls accurate color.

As for “yellowish” tint. A warmer screen is more accurate than a blue screen.
[doublepost=1508735320][/doublepost]
You can change Samsung’s color presets to SRBG. It’s been there for a while. At least Samsung gives you an option, unlike Apple. I like saturation as it looks better. It’s not like Apple will allow you to have that option.
Apple doesn’t need options because all their screens are correctly calibrated.
 

thadoggfather

macrumors G4
Oct 1, 2007
10,830
7,658
Won't get rid of the off-axis cyan green cast. That's endemic to Samsung OLEDs, which apparently is the sole supplier for the X. I greatly prefer the slight dimming IPS LCD's give you over the crappy color shift on off-angle viewing on OLEDs.
this will be a benefit to 8 plus no doubt

Apple can't overcome physical limitations

off axis P3 LED will be superior, assuming you have a good P3 LED unit :D
 

Nilhum

macrumors regular
Dec 20, 2016
199
270
Won't get rid of the off-axis cyan green cast. That's endemic to Samsung OLEDs, which apparently is the sole supplier for the X. I greatly prefer the slight dimming IPS LCD's give you over the crappy color shift on off-angle viewing on OLEDs.
Perhaps it will be different with the X. Apple will have control over the calibration itself, even if Samsung produces the panels. And still better than LG’s OLEDs in the pixel 2.
 

thadoggfather

macrumors G4
Oct 1, 2007
10,830
7,658
Perhaps it will be different with the X. Apple will have control over the calibration itself, even if Samsung produces the panels. And still better than LG’s OLEDs in the pixel 2.
Wishful thinking- You can see in hands on at iPhone X event, it has the classic OLED off axis tint. its a physical characteristic of the displays, it appears. Not calibration related.

its not a huge deal, but it is inherent to mobile panel OLED.

I think its worth the trade off for the contrast, and infinite blacks.

And Apple calibration magic with already beautiful OLED displays, should be a tasty thing
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jetcat3

Zune55

macrumors 6502a
May 2, 2015
910
297
I can spot a Galaxy phone from across the room by its screen's weird hyper saturated colors and cyan/green cast, especially when looked at from an angle. As a photo retoucher by trade, that crazy cyan color has always been one of the many turnoffs of a Samsung smart phone for me.

Here’s to hope hoping Apple's come up with a more natural presentation of color for their OLEDs.
Do you mean previous generation galaxy phones or the current ones like s7 and s8? samsung has optional display settings maybe the unit you saw may have set to different settings?
 
  • Like
Reactions: jamesrick80

sumsingwong

macrumors 6502a
Dec 15, 2012
766
364
I can spot a Galaxy phone from across the room by its screen's weird hyper saturated colors and cyan/green cast, especially when looked at from an angle. As a photo retoucher by trade, that crazy cyan color has always been one of the many turnoffs of a Samsung smart phone for me.

Here’s to hope hoping Apple's come up with a more natural presentation of color for their OLEDs.
Manual management of color profiles based on content isn’t state of the art. Lol.

What’s state of the art is displaying the correct mode AUTOMATICALLY, based on content, which is what Apple devices do.
Hmmm...looks it it has automatic and manual on my Note 8. What proof do you have that the X display is adaptive? My 6S+ does not adapt to content. I can match my 6S+ display if I select basic.
 
Last edited:

MrX8503

macrumors 68020
Sep 19, 2010
2,269
1,571
Hmmm...looks it it has automatic and manual on my Note 8. What proof do you have that the X display is adaptive? My 6S+ does not adapt to content. I can match my 6S+ display if I select basic.
I didn't specifically say the X has it. I'm saying that Apple devices (Macs, iPads, iPhones) with P3 displays auto switches between P3 and sRGB.
 

barkomatic

macrumors 601
Aug 8, 2008
4,027
1,798
Manhattan
i think if i was curious about a visual quality of an object... and i went to a certain website..
that looked like this:

View attachment 726759
...i wouldn't read it because they're definitely not concerned with visuals in the way i was curious about


------
edit
and hey, i'm mostly joking but not really :)
but, i'm joking on the site, not you jamesrick..
The folks over in the iPad forum were sure excited about DisplayMate's rating when they said the iPad had the best LCD screen on the market -- and it came up frequently in threads there. I bet if the iPhone X gets a good rating it will be posted about constantly here. Regardless, I think a screen would really have to be a disaster these days for the average consumer to be able to tell a difference.

It's also a technical site -- it's not trying to sell you something.
 

roeiz

macrumors 65816
Sep 13, 2010
1,024
560
didn't they say in the keynote that they could finally use OLED after solving the limitations that they had with it?
this probly means the color stuff.
 

jamesrick80

macrumors 68020
Sep 12, 2014
2,496
2,091
Pretty much says it all. I don't want to have to be picking through color profiles to make it work, it should do it itself.
Something that literally takes 5 seconds to do, stop being lazy and having Apple force color profiles on you that most of you guys don't even know if its the right profile especially since Apple is known for yellow displays. The new iphone 8 plus camera photos have been showing a saturated color profile when they could have used a similar profile like the photo display mode on the Note 8. So yeah go ahead and let Apple pick your color profile and give up your choice and deal with it not always being correct. If your iphone display looks washed out, thank Apple because you seem to appreciate it that way.