Homeschooling now illegal in CA

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by CorvusCamenarum, Sep 26, 2008.

  1. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #1
    story here

    I think this is what disturbs me the most - the notion that the government knows what's best for you.
     
  2. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #2
    Yeah, because our public schooling system is doing such a fine job these days. :rolleyes:
     
  3. wordmunger macrumors 603

    wordmunger

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    #3
    The story has no date. According to this site, the ruling was overturned.
     
  4. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #4
    Personally, I don't see the problem with insisting that children must be taught by qualified teachers and would support a similar law if it was proposed for the UK.
     
  5. wordmunger macrumors 603

    wordmunger

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    #5
    I've done quite a bit of googling around and can only surmise that this story refers to a decision in March of 2008. That ruling was overturned in August.

    The original linked story offers very few details and I'm not seeing any other news reports about it.

    Personally, I wouldn't have any problem with children being home-schooled by parents who are unqualified to teach... as long as those children are not allowed to VOTE when they turn 18.
     
  6. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #6
    I taught both our children after withdrawing them from school, with help from Ms Skunk and variously talented and knowledgeable friends. I would rather not be legislated against.
    The local authority inspected the facilities and interviewed them both on various occasions, and pronounced themselves extremely satisfied.

    Why the hell should they not be allowed to vote? :confused:
     
  7. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #7
    What has this got to do with public schools? It's to ensure that kids are taught by qualified teachers (private/public/or homeschooled). The argument surrounds whether qualified teachers are any better than unqualified parents when it comes to academic teaching.
     
  8. bartelby macrumors Core

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    #8
    I'd be very against a the idea of home schooling being illegal in the UK.
    The way things are going with general education it might be the only option if you want your kids to be able to do more than regurgitate specific facts in an exam.
     
  9. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #9
    Well, that was my point actually. The so-called "qualified" teachers in the public education system aren't necessarily doing the best job. I said public schools in specific because I have no experience with any private schools, so I was sticking to what I know.
     
  10. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #10
    So do parents with no qualifications do better?
     
  11. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #11
    I never said that. I was merely pointing out that "qualified" is a very subjective term.
     
  12. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #12
    It depends. Regular inspection should answer that question.
     
  13. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #13
    Exactly. Flat out denying the opportunity isn't right.
     
  14. redwarrior macrumors 603

    redwarrior

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    #14
    Uh, yeah, they do.
     
  15. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #15
    Again, it depends. :cool:
     
  16. és: macrumors 6502a

    és:

    #16
    Do you mind me asking why you taught from home?

    Because government hasn't had the chance to brainwash them into believing that their way is best, and because Winston hasn't had a chance to rewrite the history books in your house.
     
  17. swingerofbirch macrumors 68030

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    #17
    I am a liberal, but having been through a public education, if I ever have children, which I doubt I will, I think it would be ideal to have them involved in the community but not bound by the confines and drugging of the public education system. I think a very ideal system would be to have children taught by tutors who come to the home who are experts in their fields. I have to admit I haven't thought this through entirely, as the children would have a lot more free time on their hands. But, there must be a better way for children to spend their time than in public schools.

    So, I guess you can glean from my posting that it's not just creationists who would prefer not to have their (hypothetical) children in public schools.
     
  18. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #18
    A long story, but, briefly, our youngest, magical boy was taken ill at the age of three, was hospitalised with no diagnosis in Great Ormond Street for several months, operated on for hydrocephalus, became severely epileptic, suffered several major strokes and lived at home under our 24-hour care, becoming gradually more disabled over the next nine years until he died at home at the age of twelve. The other children were unwilling and unable to concentrate on their schoolwork while being away from him through his ongoing crises, and we all felt that home education was the most appropriate solution.

    I thought that might have been the answer... :)
     
  19. JG271 macrumors 6502a

    JG271

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    #19
    Here (in the UK) we have a scheme whereby children who lack in one subject area can receive one to one tuition or have extra small classes in schools. I think that this is the way forward, personally i am very much in favour of public schools, but with each student individually taken into account. Public schools help children to make friends and just learn to socialize and communicate with people better.
     
  20. skunk macrumors G4

    skunk

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    #20
    I assume you are using the term "public schools" in a US rather than a UK context.
     
  21. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #21
    I don't believe I implied that you said anything. I was just asking a question.

    Have you got any evidence to back up your assertion red? Surely the outcomes that we're after here are the best interests of children/young adults academically, personally, and socially? Assertions are wonderfully fun but at then end of the day it's hard evidence that X-type of education teaching is best at teaching which specific student. Are you basing you answer on anything other than your own personal feelings?

    Personally I hated school. From high school onwards I'm pretty sure I would have been better suited to working independently to a syllabus - as long as i had external pressure to make sure I was keeping up with it all.
     
  22. redwarrior macrumors 603

    redwarrior

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    #22
    I home schooled my children up until this year; they are now in a private school. (Daughter 17, Son 7) I only have my own experience and interaction with other home schooling families through our home school group.

    When I started teaching my daughter in 3rd grade, I was amazed at her power of memorization and regurgitation with absolutely no use for the information. She couldn't think for herself. And she was in a supposedly very good public school system.

    One thing of which I'm certain, they are not socialized well in public schools. You don't take a child and put him into a situation where he interacts constantly with other children his age and expect him to mature. Children must be socialized by adults. My daughter is a leader, with excellent social skills, and often mentors other girls her age.

    I could write a book! My personal experience and extensive research I did before I started homeschooling convinced me that what I was doing was just so much better for my children, in every area of their lives. And experience has proven that I was right.
     
  23. CorvusCamenarum thread starter macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #23
    OK, from what I can tell, the first ruling came down in late February/early March, upholding the lower court's decision (see here). Said ruling has since been reversed (see here) as of August. Why the original article I linked to is reporting the original ruling six months after the fact I have no idea. I've since sent them an e-mail including above links.

    My bad. Anyone know how to edit a thread title?
     
  24. BoyBach macrumors 68040

    BoyBach

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    #24
    My problem with home schooling in the UK is that the law states that a child must receive a full-time education by "school or otherwise", with the understanding that the LEA must intervene "if it appears" that the child is not receiving a suitable education. The problem is that a parent has no obligation to inform the LEA that they are home schooling their child, which leaves the system open to abuse, unintended or not.

    Perhaps I should amend my hypothetical Home Schooling Law to insist that the child must be registered with the LEA to facilitate regular home assessments and inspections?
     
  25. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #25
    But this is just an anecdote. It doesn't back up your blanket charge that parents with no qualifications are better than qualified teachers. How do you know your kids wouldn't have done better if you paid a qualified teacher to give lessons in your home?

    edit: re: your "children must be socialised by adults" comment I'd say that is very myopic. Surely children need to be socialised by interaction with everyone. What is stopping a child in public (or private school) from socialising with adults? I can't see how the two are mutually exclusive at all.
     

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