Hotel owner tells Hispanic workers to change names

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Tomorrow, Oct 26, 2009.

  1. Tomorrow macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #1
    From Yahoo! News:

    The article doesn't address what I think is the real issue - that the racism is on the part of the patrons who think that the workers should have Anglicized names.

    I can follow his logic to a point, but this doesn't sound like a very smart move on his part.
     
  2. arkitect macrumors 603

    arkitect

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    #2
    I wonder what that could be… they can be glad he didn't napalm them.

    Why the twunt couldn't just learn some Spanish? :confused:
     
  3. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #3
    Martin (Mar-teen) and Marcos are less strange than some of the names I've seen English speaking Americans give their children. :rolleyes:
     
  4. Tomorrow thread starter macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    I'm sure if we wait long enough, that will become a news story as well. :eek:

    I don't know, I've lived in Texas for nearly 15 years. Spanish-sounding names spoken with Spanish-sounding accents are pretty damn common around here, so I don't think much of it.

    I think the hotel owner is worried about a couple from, say, Michigan calling to reserve a room and talking to someone at the front desk named Isabel (ees-ah-BELL), and being put off by it. It sounds to me like he's pushing his own fears onto his hypothetical customers, and blaming them for it.
     
  5. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #5
    My mother is a gm at a hotel, she says the hispanic workers work harder than most, but they do tend to talk in spanish in front of guests which is bad manners IMO. I don't know the point of changing their names though.
     
  6. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #6
    I have no problem with requiring English at all time. Changing the name I feel crosses the line.
     
  7. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    Why? If they communicate better in Spanish, then they should be allowed to speak it. Instructions might get lost in translation and then the job doesn't end up being done properly.
     
  8. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #8
    Its bad for business and generally bad manners, plain and simple. I don't invite you into my house and then talk to everyone around you in a foreign language. It leads to patrons thinking the help is talking about them especially if they are telling jokes etc.
     
  9. Queso macrumors G4

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    #9
    To be fair it is New Mexico. Don't most people there already speak Spanish?
     
  10. Tomorrow thread starter macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    I have met a handful of very insecure English speakers around here who feel the same way - even my wife, who has lived her entire life in Texas, used to feel that way.

    Think of it this way: would they be talking about the patrons in Spanish if they thought there was any chance at all that the patron knows some Spanish? Because that's how it is around here - I'm sure a very high percentage of people around here who do not speak Spanish could pick out enough words from a conversation to know what's being said about them.

    I might understand how it could be bad for business - maybe - but bad manners? I don't think so.
     
  11. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #11
    The hotel industry caters to more than just in-state patrons. If thats the attitude they are taking thats probably why they are going out of business. Everyone should know English, not everyone knows Spanish.
     
  12. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #12
    You are inviting patrons in as paid guests and then speaking a language they do not understand. How is that not bad manners?
     
  13. Peterkro macrumors 68020

    Peterkro

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    #13
    The "help"? Do you live in some antebellum fantasy world?
     
  14. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    I still haven't figured out how it is bad manners. :confused: If German "patrons" come to the hotel is the "help" then only allowed to speak German when they are around? Honestly, your point leads me to believe you are insecure, not that others have bad manners.

    Changing names goes too far. Forcing the workers to speak a certain language to each other goes too far. Plain and simple.
     
  15. Ttownbeast macrumors 65816

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    The absurdity of this situation is that we are not allowed to assert the custom of language in our own country, we go abroad to foreign speaking nations and it is considered rude of us if we do not learn to speak their language(s) for the convenience of our host nations citizenry as visitors or immigrants. We're not on equal terms as hosts we're expected to comply with every one else's customs even within our own borders, but if we visit elsewhere they are not expected to comply with our customs--this is the case even when we are at war with somebody--we'll bomb the living crap out of them, but turn around and say "let's respect their culture, it's their land" well when settlers first arrived here that wasn't the cultural norm Europeans wiped out the natives and took it for themselves. I say if Mexicans want to speak Spanish in the U.S. and be a fair representative part of the nations population we march on Mexico city surprise the hell out of them and annex the entire country--then I'll be just fine with bilingualism because there would be enough citizens speaking two languages to make learning both necessary and convenient rather than forcing a majority to submit to minority.
     
  16. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    If there are a group of three friends and two of them speak German and you do not, it would be bad manners for them to communicate with each other in German. I don't quite understand what people don't get about that.

    If the workers can speak appropriate English it's not unreasonable to ask to speak it in front of customers who we can most accurately assume speak English at a minimum.
     
  17. Rodimus Prime macrumors G4

    Rodimus Prime

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    #17

    The requiring to change names I feel is against the law.

    Requiring English is fine under the eyes of the law. I can see how it is annoying but at the same time I can understand why it is important. If they all speak Spanish (or another langage) and a guest wants help they feel they can not ask the workers because they will not understand them. But if they works are required to speak English then everyone knows that they can talk to them.
     
  18. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #18
    So when I went to Germany, even though the hotel staff spoke to me in English, did the hotel staff have bad manners when they talked to each other in German which I didn't understand a word of? :rolleyes:

    It's a hotel. People from all around the world will be staying there, of course staff will not be speaking in the guests' native language.
     
  19. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #19
    If the majority of their customers spoke English exclusively and they spoke German in front of you (creates perceived barrier to communication), then yes, it's bad manners. Since it's in Germany, it's probably not rude to converse in German...

    This is a random place in New Mexico. Not a whole lot of international tourism.
     
  20. Ttownbeast macrumors 65816

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    it depends are the three friend in Germany or the United States in Germany it would be rude not to speak to them in German in the U.S. it is considered rude not to speak to them in German...well I guess it really doesn't depend then does it? actually that's pretty ****ed up.
     
  21. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    This isn't a hard concept.

    When you're performing a service for someone or communicating with a group of people you should speak a universally understood language if you can. It's as simple as that, especially in a service industry.

    FWIW, I am against the employees being forced to change their names.
     
  22. Tomorrow thread starter macrumors 604

    Tomorrow

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    #22
    If you're speaking TO the patrons in a language they don't understand, when you DO know their language, I can see that being bad manners.

    If you ONLY know a language that the patrons don't speak, and you're speaking to your co-workers and NOT to the patrons, how is that bad manners?

    QFT. Emphasis mine.
     
  23. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #23
    Your example is definitely one of bad manners, but it isn't relevant to the situation. If your example, you are a person in the group of people who is being excluded. We aren't talking about a situation where people are in a group and certain member are being excluded by way of a language barrier, we are talking about a much broader situation. Given the rules, if a guest is checking in at the front desk and two workers, who are not interacting with said guest, walk through the room they are expected to change their language from Spanish to English just because they are within earshot. That's really nit picky and honestly quite absurd.
     
  24. Queso macrumors G4

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    #24
    That's very insular thinking. If the USA is going to grow economically you need to realise the world is becoming far more multi-polar. Would you demand English-only speaking hotel workers to learn Spanish in case some guests from Argentina turn up? If not, why not?
     
  25. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    Because the hotel workers would be English-only speaking. If you can, speak a universally understood language so you don't exclude people. It's not that complicated.

    Speak a language your guests can understand if you are able.
     

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