How can I tell if my MBP is equipped for 2.4 and 5.0 GHz wireless?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by MacRacer, Mar 12, 2009.

  1. MacRacer macrumors regular

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    #1
    Hi, I have a MacBook Pro. I am wondering if my Mac is equipped for the use of 2.4 GHz and 5.0 GHz wireless mode. I want to use the 5.0 GHz mode for my Mac and 2.4 GHz for my other PCs. I have a 2.5 GHz MacBook Pro with 2 GB of RAM. I thik it is the Rev. E model. Can my Mac connect to a 5.0 GHz wireless-n mode?
     
  2. Peace macrumors P6

    Peace

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    #2
    Applications>Utilities>Network Utility>Info

    Select the network interface for the airport. It will show you.
     
  3. MacRacer thread starter macrumors regular

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    #3
    It doesn't show it. I know that I am on the 2.4 GHz mode, yet my router is dying. I am going to buy a new one but I don't know if my mac supports the 5.0 GHz mode. I don't want to waste money on something extra which I don't need if my Mac won't use the 5 GHz mode.
     

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  4. MacRacer thread starter macrumors regular

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  5. emt1 macrumors 65816

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    #5
    If it's revision E, then it supports 802.11n. Also because you are connecting at 130Mb/sec then I'm pretty sure thats another sign it supports 802.11n.
     
  6. Peace macrumors P6

    Peace

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    #6
    It shows it.

    Model : Wireless Network adapter (802.11a/b/g/n). This means it can operate on a or b or g or n networks. 802.11n is 5GHz

    The last one is 802.11n 5GHz

    From Wikipedia :http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEEE_802.11n

    To achieve maximum throughput a pure 802.11n 5 GHz network is recommended. The 5 GHz band has substantial capacity due to many non-overlapping radio channels and less radio interference as compared to the 2.4 GHz band.[3] An 802.11n-only network may be impractical for many users because the existing computer stock is predominantly 802.11b/g only. Replacement of incompatible WiFi cards or of entire laptop stock is necessary for older computers to operate on the network. Consequently, it may be more practical in the short term to operate a mixed 802.11b/g/n network until 802.11n hardware becomes more prevalent. In a mixed-mode system, it’s generally best to use a dual-radio access point and place the 802.11b/g traffic on the 2.4 GHz radio and the 802.11n traffic on the 5 GHz radio.
     
  7. eldy macrumors 6502

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  8. partytime2, Dec 20, 2010
    Last edited: Dec 20, 2010

    partytime2 macrumors newbie

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    #8
    The real way to tell

    Just because it says 802.11n doesn't mean it is compatible with 5.0ghz. The computer I am on now is on wireless n but it doesn't have 5.0ghz. The best way to tell is to look and see if it has 802.11a. Your mbp does so it has 5.0. The reason is because "a" operates in the 5.0 spectrum only so your card would have to be capable of 5.0, where as "n" can operate in either so they can make a cheap one that is 2.4 only and still call it "n"

    I dont really like how they label wireless n products as they dont tell you enough because there are soo many variants of n. There are cards like the cheap one on my pc now that say "n" and only go to 72.5mbps instead of 300mbps for example. They should say specifically in the name how fast it goes and what bands.

    basically as a summary to find out if a card has 5.0ghz you must look to see if it has wireless "a". If it does then it has 5.0. If you want to know the max speed, look in the description.
     
  9. elpmas macrumors 68000

    elpmas

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    #9
    I usually just hold alt/option then click on my wireless bars at the top screen. It gives you brief overview of your connection. :eek:
     
  10. r0g macrumors newbie

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    #10
    Peace, you quoted wikipedia to make your point, but you left off the last sentence of that paragraph, which ironically, happened to invalidate your entire post. The next sentence reads "This setup assumes that all the 802.11n clients are 5 GHz capable, which isn't a requirement of the standard."

    The important point here is, just knowing that your card supports 802.11n isn't enough to know if it also supports 5 GHz. 802.11n can operate at 2.4 or 5 GHz (and in a variety of other modes pertaining to backward compatibility with 802.11b/g). Of course, if you actually read the article you quoted, you'd know this. ;-)

    partytime2 nailed it though -- "The best way to tell is to look and see if it has 802.11a". Again, 802.11a operates at 5 GHz, so it's a good indication your Mac's card will also support 802.11n at 5 GHz.

    (I just registered to post this and hopefully clear things up, since this thread is high on the Google results for "macbook 802.11n 5ghz")
     
  11. mangusta1969 macrumors newbie

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    Apr 29, 2011
    #11
    Any way to disable 802.11n (5Ghz) connections on a MBP?

    Is there a way to suppress my 2008 MacBook Pro's attempts to connect to a non-existent 5Ghz wireless network? I am connected fine wirelessly on my Cisco E4200 router's 2.4Ghz RF band, as the 5Ghz RF band does not have enough range to reach my laptop (about 120 feet away from the router).

    The reason I want to disable my laptop's 5Ghz airport access is that I have some wireless speakers that operate locally on the 5Ghz band and the Airport board constantly tries to connect to the Cisco router on the 5Ghz band, creating interference with my speakers. I have already disabled the Cisco's use of the 5Ghz RF band, but the laptop is still generating massive clicks and pops with the radio receivers in my wireless speakers. As soon as I put the MBP to sleep, all of this interference stops immediately, so I know that the MBP is the source of the problem.
     
  12. MacRacer thread starter macrumors regular

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    #12
    I don't think it is possible. But I think the 5ghz radio noise from the Mac is dormant until it finds a 5ghz to connect to. The Mbp is in a receiving mode not broadcasting. It's odd to hear that. I know cell phones will create noise too. Look into that, like turn turning the phone off. If u have a 5ghz wireless phone system in your house that could be the source too. I hope this helps. I have 5ghz wireless speakers and I don't have a problem.
     
  13. mangusta1969 macrumors newbie

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    #13
    MacRacer,

    Thanks for your prompt reply, but it is definitely my MBP that is causing the interference problem. If I just turn off the Airport interface on the laptop, I get no speaker interference from my MBP when I am using it. House phones are also not the problem, as the only time I have a problem is when I am using the wireless network. I also have a Mac Airbook and it causes the same type of occasional pops when I am using it in wi-fi mode on the 2.4Ghz band. It appears both of my Macs are periodically transmitting a 5Ghz signal to see if there are any local networks that will respond in this frequency area.

    My router is a Cisco E4200; it is located about 100 feet away from the wireless speaker receivers so I don't think its signal can reach my location; I have also manually disabled the Cisco's 5Ghz network.

    My wireless system is an Amphony L1600 (www.amphony.com). What type of wireless speaker system are you using? BTW, the Amphony system works great, with CD quality sound and signal to noise ratios, and I can use virtually any brand of speaker with its wireless receivers and 80 watt RMS digital amplifiers.
     
  14. Coolestdude macrumors member

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    Mar 22, 2011
    #14
    This works for a couple of the icons on the top of the screen. Thanks for this tip. Most useful thing I've read today.


    Obviously I'm a newbie. I discovered this function allows me to verify TM backups too.
     
  15. frankieboy macrumors regular

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    #15
    Under System Profiler > Network > Airport, check the supported channels. If you have supported channels above 11, your Mac supports 5 Ghz, because those channels are only available under a 5Ghz connection.

    For example, my 2011 MBP shows 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 36, 40, 44, 48, 52, 56, 60, 64, 100, 104, 108, 112, 116, 120, 124, 128, 132, 136, 140, 149, 153, 157, 161, 165.
     
  16. Macsavvytech macrumors 6502a

    Macsavvytech

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    #16
    Damn, just found out my router is only 5.0Ghz.
     
  17. MacRacer thread starter macrumors regular

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    #17
    I am using the Cables Unlimited 900 Mhz speakers. I use them for background noise in such. I only need high quality sound when I fell like having a party for myself and pissing off the neighbors. The sound is good. Not the best though. I read around and looked but there is no way to turn off the 5Ghz mode on the MBP. It is a always on seeking mode. frankieboy hit the spot on the channels. Mine shows the same figures, almost. I would look into a different product or even looking into an Aitport express. There is options, you just have to look. I hope this works. Good Luck.
     
  18. MacRacer thread starter macrumors regular

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    #18
    How in the world did you end up buying a 5Ghz only router? What brand is it? I am eager to know now. And I figure by your user name you would know too. :D I learned a lot from these forums. There is always something to learn with the Macs.
     
  19. iEric macrumors 6502a

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    #19
    802.11n can run in both 2.4 and 5.0 ghz.

    The iPhone 4 has 802.11n but only in 2.4ghz.
     
  20. Hans Brix macrumors 6502

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    #20
    Nice trick!
     
  21. Chris3k2 macrumors newbie

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    #21
    So if i have a dualband router that broadcasts 2.4ghz and 5.0ghz will the 5.0ghz show up even if the device/hardware only accepts 2.4ghz? or does the device/hardware need to also be 5.0ghz in order to see it broadcast.
     
  22. 700-Grizz macrumors 6502

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    #22
    Interesting read for sure! I got a new MBP for xmas and I have the airport extreme---I did the alt/option and clicked on my wireless. it showes:

    PHYMODE: 802.11N
    CHANNEL 2 (2.4GHZ)


    SO really I should be able to get onto 5GHZ right? How do I go about doing this?
     
  23. gorskiegangsta macrumors 65816

    gorskiegangsta

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    #23
    You are correct in that respect. Here's a screenshot of my Linksys E3000 dual-band wireless router.
    [​IMG]
    As you can see, the 2.4GHz channels are 1-11 while the 5GHz channels are 36 onward.


    The device needs to be 5GHz capable in order to see the connection. It won't even show up for 2.4GHz only devices. In my house I have a plethora of devices but only those that support 5GHz see my 5GHz network.
     

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