How do shops repair a liquid damaged logic board with an SMC problem?

Audit13

macrumors 603
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Apr 19, 2017
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I purchased a "parts" early 2015 13" Air that had liquid damaged for its screen.

I took the machine apart and removed as much of the coffee residue as I could. The trackpad works but not the keyboard.

I was able to load High Sierra but it was kind of slow and the fan always ran at full speed.

The Apple diagnostics (held down the "D" key during boot up with an external keyboard) said there was a problem with the SMC which I expected.

There are several places in my city that claim to repair liquid damage. If the SMC is damaged, I assume that a keyboard SMC reset would not be enough to get rid of the SMC error in the Apple diagnostics program.

Here are my questions: how do repair shops get rid of the SMC error? Do they replace the SMC chip? Presumably, fixing the SMC issue will stop the fan from running at full speed 100% of the time.

Any information would be appreciated.

Thanks.
 

golip

macrumors newbie
Dec 19, 2015
13
1
Louis rossman at rossman group is the guy you need but yep pretty much you’ll need a new smc programmed to your board
 
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Audit13

macrumors 603
Original poster
Apr 19, 2017
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Louis rossman at rossman group is the guy you need but yep pretty much you’ll need a new smc programmed to your board
Thanks for the reply.

I've had liquid-damaged logic boards repaired before but I was wondering if it's a programming fix or a chip replacement. I've seen LR's YouTube video about smc chip replacement.
 

Audit13

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Apr 19, 2017
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Just wanted to give an update.

I was able to buy a used top case with the speakers, keyboard, and trackpad. The top case was in okay shape but the seller assured me that the keyboard and trackpad were fully functional. I cleaned the board again with isopropyl alcohol and a toothbrush.

Moved all the parts from the "as-is" Macbook I mentioned in my original post and it booted. Since they keyboard was detected by the board, I was able to perform a PRAM and SMC reset. I ran the Apple diagnostics by holding down the "D" key and there were no problems.

I now have a working early 2015 13" MBA with 8GB of ram and a 128 GB SSD.
 

Mrbobb

macrumors 601
Aug 27, 2012
4,989
194
Am not shy with soldering irons but I kept messing up the pads until I saw Rossman's video, oh he uses a heat gun! :)
 

Macdctr

macrumors 6502a
Nov 25, 2009
669
332
Ocean State
I have found with a liquid spill laptop you’re better off replacing the keyboard/upper case assembly entirely.

Out of three MacBook Airs I have purchased already this year (all three had liquid spills on them), this is what I did and all three were fully functional afterwards.

Glad to see you were able to get yours up and running!
 

Audit13

macrumors 603
Original poster
Apr 19, 2017
5,738
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Toronto, Ontario, Canada
I was lucky with this last air I bought.

I purchased two on a prior occasion and changing the keyboard and trackpad were not enough to get them going. One had to have the SMC chip replaced and the other had a problem with the backlight fuse. I had them both repaired by a local shop. I kept one for myself and the other was given to a relative.
 

Macdctr

macrumors 6502a
Nov 25, 2009
669
332
Ocean State
I was lucky with this last air I bought.

I purchased two on a prior occasion and changing the keyboard and trackpad were not enough to get them going. One had to have the SMC chip replaced and the other had a problem with the backlight fuse. I had them both repaired by a local shop. I kept one for myself and the other was given to a relative.

Funny you mention this because that's what I did with my 2013 MBA after restoring it. I gave it to my niece so she could use it for college. :)
 
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