How is best to test and monitor you iMac

Discussion in 'iMac' started by roadkill401, Feb 3, 2015.

  1. roadkill401 macrumors 6502

    roadkill401

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2015
    #1
    I finally got my set of replacement Mushkin memory delivered to me. the first set didn't seem to work, and when plugged into the iMac lasted for about 2 days before crashing the machine. When I did a diagnostic, it reported back after the crash that there was something wrong with the memory.

    No problem, pull them and back to Mushkin under RMA and replacement.


    So now I have the new set back, how is best to test or stress test the iMac to make sure that this set also isn't defective?

    So far as I have a 2012 mac mini, I put a single SODIMM into the unit and ran memtest for 4-5 loops. I remember being told a long time ago that testing memory needs to be done a single DIMM at a time or you might mask the trouble with the dual channel memory interleave. I don't know if that holds true for a mac??

    So the memory passed the mac mini test, so it's now inside my new riMac bringing it up to 32gb. Is there a best practices way to verify that the machine is running well or doing it's thing right? I remember on the PC's from 2011 era that everyone was running an app called Prime95 to stress test the machine.

    Also, I am wondering if there are any temp sensors and system spec software like the HWMonitor app for the PC that runs on a mac? I am curious how people are telling the temp of their cpu or video card, or what speed the fans are running at.

    I am very new to the world of mac so some of these items that might be obvious to everyone else is still new to me.

    thanks
     
  2. Ledgem macrumors 65816

    Ledgem

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Location:
    Hawaii, USA
    #2
    If you're looking to monitor things like fan speed, processor usage, and various temperature readouts, iStat Menus is a wonderful application for the purpose.

    Other than that, aside from using your Mac regularly and getting a feel for how it performs, I don't know of any standard performance test to ensure that the system is functioning properly. Are such things really needed these days?
     
  3. Chippy99 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2012
    #3
    If it passes Apple hardware diagnostics, then you should be good to go. Power up whilst holding down D on the keyboard.
     

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