How some Southern California drug rehab centers exploit addiction

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Aug 8, 2017.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #1
    http://www.ocregister.com/2017/05/2...ifornia-drug-rehab-centers-exploit-addiction/
    tons of fraud with addicts & their families paying the price.
     
  2. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #2
    Unfortunately this is happening everywhere, and has been happening for years. Wherever there is despiration there are scum bags looking to take advantage.

    Right now the world of addiction treatment, even mental health as a whole to some extent, has little regulation. A lot of states are considering putting in controls.

    One big problem I see are people pop up these "sober houses" without any real funding. They generally do wel due to the demand, but lust for money is never good. A lot of these places end up prioritizing weekly/monthly income over what's best for the client/community. If someone is getting high, do you kick them out and lose money -or- let them stay and keep getting paid?

    My best suggestion is if you're trying to get someone into treatment, do your homework. Talk to local, trustworthy experts about reccomending programs. If a program isn't proving to be acting in an ethical manner, get your loved out immediately.
     
  3. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #3
    In the same way psychiatric clinics will hold patients for that sweet insurance money.
     
  4. jerwin macrumors 65816

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    #4
  5. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #5
    Florida is notoriously bad. I have heard a lot of horror stories about places in Florida. People go there because it's cheap, but a lot of the places are flop houses. I have heard stories of families essentially being extorted for money. Absolute craziness.

    A couple things to note about this articles.
    1) It mentions that a lot of sober house owners don't hold any credentials- you don't have to. A lot of these "sober houses" or "halfway houses" are not "medical treatment facilities" or "rehabs". There are basically a place to stay where people are (supposed to be) sober, usually drug tested, etc. Generally these are the places that have the most problems because they have the least rules and regulation.

    2) Drug testing fraud is absolutely amazing. Even legal drug testing can be a scam. If the rehab is not a medical facility one should be very weary if your insurance is being utilized to pay for these. Interestingly, it will costs an employer under $20/test to administer a lab confirmed drug test paying cash to the laboratory for a standard 12 panel drug test. These sketchy labs that pair with sober houses will charge insurances up to $1200... and test up to 3-4x weekly... for each test they'll reimburse the "collection site" $200-300. This is how sober houses make a lot of money.

    I was in the position of setting up drug testing for a residential psych program (similar concept to a sober house except a lot more regulation), and it was crazy. Unless we agreed to bill through insurance a lot of the companies wanted nothing to do with us. Knowing how expensive the insurance route can be for patients, and how much fraud exists in the lab business too, we opted to pay out of pocket for every lab test. $16/test... vs $1200. In fact, that program is entirely private pay which makes life far easier.

    3) People do die in treatment. It's an unfortunate reality of addiction, especially when programs are not keeping the clients locked away from society. Kicking people to the curb for relapsing is a contentious argument. On the one hand, you want to to look out for the persons safety, on the other, you have to protect the community. Personally, I believe if someone relapses they should never be kicked to the curb- send them to the hospital or find them another level of care. Unfortunately people do often refuse to get help after getting kicked out of a program and endanger themselves and you can't necessarily stop them.

    The addiction business is booming these days and there's a lot of crap going on. Recovery rates are not great. But there are good programs out there. Treatment can only educate. Ultimately the person has to decide if they want to be sober or not. If not, no program is likely to "cure' them.
     
  6. Zenithal macrumors 68040

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    #6
    Florida often spars with Mississippi to be the worst state.
     
  7. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #7
    The best way to prevent drug addiction and overdose is to prevent people from abusing drugs in the first place. If they don't start, they don't have a problem. If they do start, it's awfully tough to get off. So we can keep them from going on, maybe by talking to youth and telling them "No good really bad for you in every way", but if they don't start, it will never be a problem.
     
  8. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #8
    Logically that makes sense. The reality is though despite more and more drug education, constant deaths of both young and old, the problem seems to only be getting worse. Maybe it has to get worse before it starts getting better?

    I think the age old issue with teenagers and really people in general is the "it can't happen to me" fallacy.

    The medical community is getting more responsible with prescribing. But when prescription availability dwindles street drugs like heroin take their place. That's what happened ~2010 when OxyContin came out with their "abuse resistant" formulation and has been happening in states cracking down on negligent prescribers such as Massachusetts.

    I don't think anyone has yet developed a solid way of preventing addiction given our current climate.
     
  9. juanm macrumors 65816

    juanm

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    #9
    https://twitter.com/nbcnews/status/895013204849336320
     
  10. A.Goldberg macrumors 68000

    A.Goldberg

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    #10
    http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/08/politics/donald-trump-opioid-briefing-abuse/index.html

    It looks like the Trump adminstrstion thinks the best course of action is to increase opioid prosecution.

    I don't have a problem with prosecuting dealers, they're in part to blame for this. But if you look at the individuals and consider addiction a mental health disorder, I think this is a very poor approach.
    --- Post Merged, Aug 9, 2017 ---
    "Just say no" really worked for Nancy Regan. :rolleyes:

    Glad to see Trump has a firm grasp on the pathology of addiction and had a "productive" conference today.
     

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