How to POLITELY start conversations with mom about selling my car?

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by NotFound, Apr 19, 2007.

  1. NotFound macrumors 6502a

    NotFound

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    #1
    Ok, so here is the deal. I am a senior in high school and I'm getting ready to start working during the summer. I will be attending college here and still living with my parents. My current car is totally paid off by my mom and has been for a couple years now.

    Because I will be living at home, with no expenses, and will have a job, I want to start a little credit under my name and I also want to buy a new for me used car.

    The problem is, getting my mom to understand that I want to do this because Id like to get some weight under my name and start becoming an adult as well. I've had my car since I was a sophomore in high school but we've owned the car since I was in the eighth grade. It's a 2002 mustang 6cylinder coupe.

    How do I approach my mom in the most POLITE and the most thankful way possible?
     
  2. BigPrince macrumors 68020

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  3. swingerofbirch macrumors 68030

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    #3
    Used cars are a pain, if yours works, keep it. Don't play musical chairs with your car.

    BTW: When I graduated high school, not only did my parents not give me a graduation present even though I graduated with above a 4.0 GPA, they also sold my car they had let me use the day after I graduated for $200 saying I wouldn't need it at college. And they sold it for way less than it was worth. It was a 91 corsica and fit me like a glove. Sure the brakes went out from time to time, but no one's perfect.

    Anyhow, I'd also vote for keeping the car.
     
  4. apfhex macrumors 68030

    apfhex

    Joined:
    Aug 8, 2006
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    Northern California
    #4
    ?! And what kind of car are you looking to buy if you can? You might have a argument point if you're going to opt for something more practical (better passenger space, better mileage, cheaper, safer, etc.)
     
  5. mcarnes macrumors 68000

    mcarnes

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    USA! USA!
    #5
    You could keep it simple and just trade in that crappy 2002 mustang. I've got an awesome 1986 Datsun pickup. Runs great, like new, and ready to trade.
     
  6. Daveway macrumors 68040

    Daveway

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2004
    Location:
    New Orleans / Lafayette, La
    #6
    I'm also in a similar position and have attempted to bring up the conversation with no success. My only savior is the fact that I'll have a sibbling driving within a year pushing me up in the que for a new car.

    Main reason was insurance for me. I'm sure that by getting out of a Mustang to say a 4cyl you will save a lot on insurance. This could be a good point to bring up.
     
  7. Leareth macrumors 68000

    Leareth

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2004
    Location:
    Vancouver
    #7
    Ok let me get this straight you want to sell the car your mom paid off and keep the money for yourself?

    I dont think there is any polite way of starting a conversation about that.

    The car works, you did not have to pay for it, what more do you need?
     
  8. Aniej macrumors 68000

    Aniej

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2006
    #8
    mom, I got Tina pregnant and we want to keep the kid. Don't worry, I am joining the military.... then after about 10 minutes of that convo, say just kidding, but I was hoping I could sell the car.
     
  9. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #9
    My sentiments as well.

    To the OP, if the car works why get a new one?
     
  10. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #10
    If you want to die, then sure, that's a good way to go about it.
     
  11. pknz macrumors 68020

    pknz

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  12. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #12
    He wants to sell the car that his mum bought for him, and buy his own car using that money, then borrow some from a bank and "become an adult."


    kekeke
     
  13. ambience macrumors member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2007
    Location:
    Near Detroit, Michigan.
    #13
    I do not know where you live, but what are your reasons for wanting to sell the car besides building credit? The cost of a new(er) car will out way gas mileage advantages of a 4 cylinder, and if you live in a cold climate use your money from your job to buy the car snow tires so it will be content in the winter. Does your mom consider the Mustang your car? if not you may want to talk about buying it from her (which it sounds like you wouldn't have to do). I'm 19 and have over 1 year of established credit with my credit card, even with this I could never take out any sort of auto loan with a decent APR. If you decide on a new(er) car you will be forced to co-sign it with your parents and the insurance will have to go in your name. The insurance in your name will be ridiculous (enter new BMW/Corvette payment), especially since it will be full coverage if you are financing the new(er) car. I'd highly recommend you stay in your current car for three reasons:
    1) You will save a ton of money that is better saved for college and housing/living expenses (if you plan to eventually move out)
    2) You have a nice car
    3) Buying a car without established credit is plain stupid. APR will be ridiculous and can only be accomplished with your parents cosigning it (defeating the purpose of being "independent").

    Instead I'd recommend you do these:
    1) Build credit by getting a credit card. As long as you are responsible with it, and understand that you should only spend money on the card that you have available to pay back. As long as you have self control there is noway a credit card can hurt you over a debit card. Its easy to get a credit card when you are young student. EDIT: Pay you balance in full every month also! I can do it so can you!
    2) If you are bored with your Mustang ( :confused: ) consider upgrading it as something to cure your lust for a new car. Your job can easily afford massive upgrades (performance, handling, visual) for your V6 mustang as it is a highly capable car, and can produce approximately 300RWHP (almost 350HP) just by adding a supercharger (Vortec V2). Companies like michigan-based MRT (I do not work for them!) provide full supercharger installs as in you take your mustang to them and they sell and install a supercharger for you. Before MRT moved, they offered a Vortec V6 mustang supercharger kit (installed) for less than 4 grand.

    Hope this helps ;)
     
  14. bartelby macrumors Core

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2004
    #14
    How about:

    "Mom, I'm thinking of selling my car and getting a new one"

    It's polite but also hints that you're serious about it.
    I don't know how these things work in the US but in the UK it's normally best to approach situations like this directly. No point dilly-dallying about skirting around the issue, just get straight in there.
     
  15. EvilDoc macrumors 6502a

    EvilDoc

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    #15
    I m not sure if this helps but, you had said you wanted to build credit. If thats the case dont but a car, i would keep what you have and and get a credit card. Even if its a secured card it looks good. I work for a Bank and i will tell you, cars are ok, but credit cards look good. But of course you need to be very careful with credit cards.

    Just my 2cents

    Evil
     
  16. Abstract macrumors Penryn

    Abstract

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    #16
    I second the suggestion for a credit card.

    If you use it to buy stuff you were going to buy with cash anyway, you're building credit without even trying. I've spent around $50,000 on my credit card, and I'm still a student. Why? Well, I pay for things like uni tuition, eBay purchases, my laptop, a few plane tickets here and there, and voila!.......a crazy-good credit rating. :)
     
  17. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

    Joined:
    May 19, 2002
    #17
    >andrewxps

    If the car is paid for, isn't costing a lot to keep running, and insurance isn't killing you.

    The short answer for anyone getting ready to go to college and trade that car for a newer one, because they are tired of it is ... you are a moron.

    A boring problem free car without a payment is nearly always better than a new one.

    Plus, going to college you will soon be building credit and digging yourself into a rather large debt hole soon anyhow -- without dumping a car into the equation.

    ---

    If you are tired of the old one, fix it up.

    Don't put anything on it worth stealing (college parking lots are good for quick cash), but you can easily change the personality of the car for not much money with Katzkin seats, cheap alloy wheels, tires, paint, steering wheel, etc. Of course I'd probably put more into the seat covers than anything else.
     
  18. ezzie macrumors 68020

    ezzie

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2006
    Location:
    Baltimore, MD
    #18
    OP, i understand your desire to start building credit and i admire that...however, i agree with others who have said that buying a car as your foray into credit-building is a bad idea. i'm almost 25 and i've had excellent credit for the last 6 years, not by buying cars (i didn't buy a car until 2004...) but by using credit wisely. i got a credit card (but not a student card!) and used it for books, art supplies, my iBook, etc. i wasn't able to pay off my balance every month, but i did it when i could, and once i graduated i paid everything off within 6 months. paying credit cards and bills on time does wonders for your credit score...don't ever miss a payment, and you'll be on your way to good credit! :)

    if you're living at home, then save as much money as you can for after your graduate and go out into the "real" world. i wish i could've done that, but i lived on my own and left school with no savings. :(

    like i said, i understand your desire to build credit, but buying a car right now isn't a smart way to start. :eek:
     

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