How to securly erase all data in SSD of rMBP?

Discussion in 'Mac Basics and Help' started by hajime, Aug 3, 2014.

  1. hajime macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #1
    Sorry I am moving forum. I am looking for a way to securely erase all the data in the SSD of the rMBP provided by my employer. What is the best way to do it besides setting up a new account with admin right and then delete my current account from there and then reformat? Does this method erase all the data in the ssd so that they cannot be retrieved even by IT?
     
  2. Tumbleweed666 macrumors 68000

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2009
    Location:
    Near London, UK.
    #2
    It depends upon your definition of "securely". Seriously.
    With SSDs there may always be some data left than can in theory be accessed by a determined person.
    If your employer is the NSA or CIA or Shin Bet you need to destroy the drive physically.
    If your employer is an ordinary company then just do a one pass erase writing zeroes with disk utility since there is literally no additionally benefit doing more with an SSD.
     
  3. simsaladimbamba

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    located
    #3
  4. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Location:
    California
    #4
    The normal "secure erase" option in Disk Util will be greyed out since you have a flash storage device and secure erase degrades the drive.

    Do this instead... go into the Security and Privacy pane of System Preferences and turn on Filevault encryption than way for the encryption to complete. Then turn off the Mac.

    Now turn it on while holding the command-option-r keys all three at once. You will see a spinning wheel while the recovery tool downloads. It will look like this.

    [​IMG]

    From this screen start Disk Utility and select the drive brand name at the very top of the left column above Macintosh HD. Then go to the erase tab and format the entire disk to Mac OS Extended (Journaled).

    Then quite Disk Util and click reinstall OS and the ~5GB OS will download and install. This will give you a drive with nothing on it except the OS that came with the machine.

    The idea is that you have erased an encrypted core storage volume and even if someone managed to unerase some of it, it would still be encrypted.
     
  5. hajime thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #5
    Thanks. Before I do this, will it be better if I also create another admin account and delete the account I use all the time? By combining these two methods, can they find a way to retrieve the data?

    My evil boss worked for a government on forensic-related research. I don't want him to have access to the data.
     
  6. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

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    California
    #6
    That would sure not hurt, but I have not read of anybody able to crack FV encryption.
     
  7. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #7
    Repeat the process (total of 2 times, with different keys). Overwriting with encrypted data once, then overwriting that again with data encrypted under a different key is about as close as you can get to a secure-erase of an SSD.

    If you're more paranoid, repeat it more times.

    Or just remove the SSD and smash it into tiny little pieces.
     
  8. damidget macrumors regular

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    Aug 3, 2013
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    #8
    That is the most secure way IMHO.
     
  9. hajime thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #9
    I think so too but I might be charged with intentional damaging of property.
     
  10. damidget macrumors regular

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    Aug 3, 2013
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    #10
    Is it your computer or the company's?
     
  11. hajime thread starter macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2007
    #11
    university's.
     

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