how to set up DHCP over 300 IPs on Airport Extreme?

Discussion in 'Mac Accessories' started by zhouxiang, Jul 15, 2015.

  1. zhouxiang macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2015
    #1
    I'm setting up a wireless intranet network using Airport Extreme DHCP service for over 300 machines. I set the static IP of my Airport Extreme as 10.1.10.1 and subnet mask as 255.255.252.0. Then enable Route Mode as DHCP Only. I found that DHCP range had been limited to 10.1.10.x for both "from" and "to" field. I'm not able to change it to 10.1.11.x. Why did this happen? Is there anything wrong with my setting?
     
  2. waw74 macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    May 27, 2008
    #2
    All of the airport models are a consumer devices, in the tech specs it says "Number of users: 50"

    If you have 300 users, you're using the wrong thing,
    and if you have 300 wireless users, and are only using 1 base station (of any kind) you're going to make everyone very miserable. Especially yourself if you're the one setting it up, when all 300 of them start complaining that the wi-fi sucks

    For a system of that size, you need to start looking at industrial gear, and multiple wireless base stations scattered around the area.
     
  3. throAU, Jul 15, 2015
    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015

    throAU macrumors 601

    throAU

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2012
    Location:
    Perth, Western Australia
    #3
    Yup. You need to change to something fit for purpose.

    Your budget will need to increase significantly, for that sort of installation you're looking at an intelligent multi-AP wireless network, proper site survey, etc.

    At the very least... you'll need a few Airports, split them onto separate VLANs on your switch, configure the APs to use different channels and SSIDs, split your users between them, etc.

    But it's just not really fit for purpose. That solution would suck. Hard.
     
  4. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #4
    I concur with the other 2, a consumer device is the wrong device for this purpose. As soon as I saw the number 300 I cringed. Even high-end enterprise-geared Cisco gear is brought to its knees with that many users on one AP.
     
  5. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #5
    I use an AirPort as the router on a 150+ client AirPort network, but the limitation does not lie with the AirPort but the DHCP range that you are using.
     
  6. ColdCase macrumors 68030

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2008
    Location:
    NH
    #6
    Yeah I was just thinking we were using an AEBS with ~200 users without issue, except for the internet connection bottleneck.
     
  7. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #7
    They do fine with the load and actually better than any prosumer product I see today, but only an enterprise class can handle more than 255 or so IPv4 addresses.
     
  8. hallux macrumors 68020

    hallux

    Joined:
    Apr 25, 2012
    #8
    You bring up a good point. Is an AEBS even capable of doling out more than 254 IP addresses? An enterprise-class AP usually connects to a managed switch that is part of the system handling DHCP duties, and can hand out addresses in ranges larger than 254 clients.
     
  9. Altemose macrumors G3

    Altemose

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Location:
    Elkton, Maryland
    #9
    Higher end network hardware does not work on the 255.255.255.0 subnet. The AirPort is limited to that specific subnet which has a total of 256 available addresses. Since the router itself occupies one IPv4 address, there are 255 available, theoretically, for other clients. That being said, since the AirPort's QoS is not user configurable they may or may not meet the demands with that high of a load. I have had over 200 clients on the AirPort network at school without issue, but if they were all trying to video chat or other bandwidth intensive tasks I am not sure how that would work out.
     
  10. HenryAZ macrumors 6502

    HenryAZ

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Location:
    South Congress AZ
    #10
    I would definitely agree with using more than one access point for that many clients, but a simple way around the DHCP issue is not to allow the AP's to hand them out. Set up on the network a Linux, FreeBSD, or even perhaps an OSX box, and use isc-dhcp-server to handle the DHCP duties. On FreeBSD, it is a simple port install. It may even be available via MacPorts or some such, otherwise download and compile.
     

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