Hurricane Michael: The Aftermath

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by RootBeerMan, Oct 14, 2018.

  1. RootBeerMan macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #1
    Well, as we all know, hurricane Michael hit the Florida panhandle and the damage was devastating. As many of us suspected, though, the Trump administration wasn't even ready for it, despite their assurances that they were. Reports are coming in from the hard hit areas that FEMA is nowhere to be seen. The aid that is coming in is, as expected, from private citizens who have come to help their fellow Americans. Looks like the residents of Louisiana have stepped up, as usual. I don't expect much, if anything from governments, as they have shown a decided lack of talent when to comes to governing and actually helping out, but this administration is worse than usual.

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/no-food-no-fema-hurricane-michaels-survivors-are-furious

     
  2. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #2
    You'd think Trump would have learned something after the debacles of Katrina and the efforts to help the people of Puerto Rico after they got hit. The administration should have been all over this - if nothing else to win votes.

    And they damn well should stop denying climate change and start acting in a sane, rational way about the environment.
     
  3. duffman9000 macrumors 68000

    duffman9000

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    #3
    Florida denying climate change starts at the governor's desk. Only when the state is under water will they realize that maybe, just maybe they have a problem.
     
  4. cube Suspended

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    #4
    It seems four unflyable F-22's were damaged.

    It is not possible to make new ones.
     
  5. Volusia macrumors 6502

    Volusia

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    #5
    I'm not sure what it is you expect "the government" to do. I have worked in Emergency Management for over 40 years and know the procedures. Both the State and FEMA have equipment, food and water stationed in areas outside of the anticipated impact areas ready to move in. Currently my son is managing one of those distribution sites. The resources come into the distribution site, the requests for resources are reviewed and prioritized and the supplies are moved. In many cases the roadways are yet capable to handling the large trucks so smaller lots are distributed via helicopter.

    Thousands of personnel are moved in to impacted areas to start the process of recovery: power crews from all over the country, emergency personnel - police, fire, EMS, and the resources needed to support them. This is a huge coordinated effort that takes time to coordinate, hence, the warnings to be ready to take care of yourself for at least 72 hours.

    People are told to expect to be self sufficient for up to 72 hours. They are also told if they are in an evacuation zone that they should leave and shelters are provided for their needs. Are they comfortable? Hell no, they are intended to save lives not be a resort. Many people stay in an area where they have been told they may be killed and then get upset that there is nobody to come rescue them when the water starts raising and the winds are blowing things down around them.

    There have been announcements of where food and water are being provided and there are numerous sites throughout the area for these distribution points.

    People expect "the government" to sweep in immediately after such a disaster and make their lives whole again. Well, that is not possible - individuals need to be ready to care for themselves and not expect some one else to do it for them.

    People think that FEMA is this huge agency with thousands of personnel just sitting around waiting for an emergency. That is not the case, FEMA is the overall agency that works to obtain the equipment and resources necessary from coordinate getting what is needed to start the process of recovery. This doesn't happen in a vacuum.

    {Rant mode off}
     
  6. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #6
    I guess we expect a government effort sufficient to save lives, protect property, and restore infrastructure. It shouldn't be the case that news organisations arrive first.
     
  7. Volusia macrumors 6502

    Volusia

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    #7

    Trust me, many of them were there before the storm hit. Staging rescue resources in a danger area is poor planning. We will typically divide our local resources into three groups: first group stayed ready to respond as soon as safe, the second group was staged somewhere close but dispersed to ensure at least some would be available immediately, and the third sent to a safe location outside of the anticipated impact zone to relieve those already on duty. The Emergency Operations Centers are staffed by representatives of local, county, State and Federal government agencies as well as NGO's (non-government organizations, Red Cross, Salvation Army, etc). These representatives are determining needs, lining up resources, and prioritizing the whole time.
     
  8. cube Suspended

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    #8
    Update: More than a dozen were left behind, it seems some are unrepairable, and the damages could be more than one billion.
     
  9. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #9
    Who cares? They can just bleed the taxpayers for more.
     
  10. cube Suspended

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    #10
    But the tooling is not there to make new ones. Recreating the assembly line would cost 10 billion.
     
  11. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #11

    They moved what could fly. What's left is parts, or scrap metal...
     
  12. RootBeerMan thread starter macrumors 65816

    RootBeerMan

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    #12
    So? You actually think the Air Force and the politicians care what it will cost? It's not their money and $10 billion is a drop in their bucket. You think they are fiscally conservative or something?
     
  13. cube, Oct 14, 2018
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2018

    cube Suspended

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    #13
    I saw a picture from before the storm. It was not scrap. F-22 readiness is around 50% (the worst in the USAF). A lot had to be fixed already.
    --- Post Merged, Oct 14, 2018 ---
    They already thought about restarting the line years ago and it was dropped because it would be too expensive.
     
  14. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #14
    Whatever were the reasons for some of those planes not being airworthy (labor, parts, priorities)... they become moot at the point it was time either to fly them out of that base ahead of the storm or secure them and hope for the best. So maybe they weren't scrap at that point... but they may well be now, unless some can be used to scavenge parts for whatever did they fly out of there before the hurricane arrived.
     
  15. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #15
    Apparently all this organisation takes too long, for victims of these calamities complain of needing support early. Organised inertia is not better than adaptive action.
     

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14 October 14, 2018