I am a redneck

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by 63dot, Jun 22, 2008.

  1. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #1
    I am not proud of it and I am not ashamed.

    Almost everything Jeff Foxworthy says makes me laugh but at the same time, I totally relate to what he says. I literally know the people he talks about, including myself.

    I have done everything from birth to dodge the stereotype, but not of my own doing, but from pressure from others.

    1) I was not born in the south, but in a rural town of less than 2,000 people in northern California. But for 200 years, the livestock has outnumbered the human population as it still does in my region.

    2) Being born Asian-American didn't change the fact my grandfather started as a farmer and that our family roots for centuries was in agriculture, as was the case of most people from pre-industrialized Japan.

    3) I cry when I hear a good Bruce, Don Henley, or Garth Brooks song.

    4) The thought of rusty cars on my property, like the two I have, are seen to me as works in progress instead of cars past their prime that have to be tossed.

    5) I love electric guitars and my favorite is the Fender Telecaster.

    6) The Dixie Chicks walk on water, what can I say.

    7) Yuppies frighten me even though I have two degrees and now working on a law degree.

    8) Though I am deeply in physics, I have to read about Unified Theory while I drink a 'Bud'

    9) As only a real redneck knows, anybody who wears a cowboy hat out of context is a poser

    10) The only way to eat at the dinner table is with elbows on the table

    ...and my NYC wife calls me "Barn Boy"
     
  2. .Andy macrumors 68030

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  3. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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  4. redwarrior macrumors 603

    redwarrior

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  5. Sun Baked macrumors G5

    Sun Baked

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    #5
    Of course we do, since it was posted in the political section.

    So bringing politics into it won't get the thread booted to another forum.

    Of course I can see Redneck as being a social issue also, like VD.
     
  6. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #6
    I just retired from being a landscape gardener for 20 years...therefore I am a democrat. I am not the ruling elite.

    The republicans are the people I often worked for...highest tax bracket and a lot to lose even on a modest tax hike. They vote their wallet.

    There has been a short lived trend from 1986 to perhaps about 2004, when a lot of blue collar working people like me got duped into voting GOP, but I personally didn't take that bait and I always knew the GOP was the money party. But look at Florida and Ohio, working class people in the upper midwest, and you will see that a lot of talk about being for the common man, but never fiscally delivering, ends the GOPs strength with blue collar workers.

    The GOP has, and always will be, a symbol of the very highest tax bracket.

    But if I were raised very wealthy and belonged to a country club and had a yacht, and knew nothing better, I too may also send my kid to Andover/Exeter, and then go the Yale route, and be a Bush insider. So I don't condemn republicans and their "Big Money". People usually vote for the side that helps them most.
     
  7. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

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    #7
    The term 'redneck' has been greatly stereotyped, and stigmatized over the years. I had two friends in Vietnam. One was from the hill country in West Virginia, and the other was from the hillbilly region of Kentucky. On night we were 'socializing', and they told me about the term 'redneck', and what it meant. Prior to that, I had never heard the term.

    They said, back home, the term 'redneck', pertained to the fact, individuals who worked the land, would wear tee shirts, but their necks and arms would be exposed. They would develop bright red, or tan (depending on skin type) necks and arms, but the rest of them would be white as a ghost. The people being referenced would most often live in the most isolated, rural areas. Most were illiterate. Their personal hygiene left much to be desired. When they came into town, often as a group, they could clear out a small store in a heart beat.

    Today, we often call anyone, living in a rural farming/ranching area by that name, 'redneck'. I think it is rather unfair, since it carries a negative stigma with it. The three groups of people I respect most are; people who give of themselves to make the world a better place, the people who feed the rest of us (family ran businesses), and those who make the things we all need. While growing up, I used to spend a week each summer, staying with my cousins. They raised a small number of goats, sheep (no jokes please), dairy and beef cattle, chickens and pigs. They also had a few acres of food crops, and alfalfa. Every time I went there, it was like stepping into another world, quite a change for a city boy. And that is just it, they lived a completely different lifestyle. I loved it, although it took me a couple years to get things figured out. Yet, the people were warm, friendly, non-judgmental, and gladly welcomed me to their world. One summer, I spent two months there. I was terribly disappointed when I had to come home.

    To the OP, you seemed to have some mixed feelings about your heritage, or perhaps I misunderstood you. I would feel very proud to have been raised in that environment.
     
  8. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #8
    that's ok, i see myself as more of an agent of change and want to work with others to be in a society that accepts everybody

    nobody should look down on others

    the other term redneck came from blair mountain when a group of pro labor protestors/supporters went against the power structure who owned the businesses at the time...the pro labor people wore red scarves

    that was the basis for pro labor all the way from cesar chavez to the civil rights act to the americans with disabilities act and was the key reason i got my ba in hr/personnel mgt - to be an advocate for the worker

    within my microcosm of mostly rural, or farming japanese american "cowboys/farmers", we got flak from people from japan who were richer and stayed there, and many non farming white people of the upper class in the usa, who basically thought since most of us were in ag, automatically were second class citizens...that plus the color of our skin, but the same tag was tossed upon hispanics, african americans, and poor white people - all who built the working core of the early ag in california, or at least were a large part before heavy mechanization

    one of the first things my father taught me was that the most honorable job in america was that of a farmer, even though he was the first one to go to retail in our family as a career from almost the start

    not only japanese american farmers, but other asian immigrant farmers were not permitted to join white churches, but the main denomination that took us in were the presbyterians, the american version that has its origins in america's first, white rural farming community of scotch and irish descent...to this day, the most common church for virtually any asian american born here who is a christian will be the presbyterian church, the same one started by "hillbillies" and not the church of england (anglicans/espicopalians) that catered to a richer crowd

    when somebody characterizes a "redneck" as someone who only and always lives in a trailer park, they don't know that many other people live in trailer parks, too

    when a redneck is referred to as a cowboy/farmer, i point out that first there are very few working cowboys today, with a smalling percentage of farmers, and that a third of cowboys in america's early years were minorities

    i admit, unlike the rich high school mates i went to school with, i had no idea what a country club was other than i didn't belong...my family's idea of a spring term vacation was to get in our car and go a couple of hours to sf where some of my classmates went to switzerland or london...i got, yes, a rusty car when i got my license, while many kids got brand new european and exotic cars...i went to largely a farming college where many of my classmates went to tawny campuses in large cities...i took to the landscaping industry while many of my mates became white collar professionals

    though i received my higher education, and eventually more than most after that, i never felt comfotable being around the silver spoon yuppie crowd who would roll their eyes because i never regularly attended golf/polo/fancy italian car shows
     
  9. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #9
    I'm not a redneck, but I do think Foxworthy is funny for some reason.
     
  10. bamaworks macrumors 6502

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    #10
    Wow, I 100% relate to the OP. I'm from the hills of Eastern KY and I've lived my share of the redneck life and am now a graduate student in Biochemistry. Most people like to negatively stereotype country individuals but I can assure you that the most trustworthy and reliable people exist in these simple conditions. Great people, my fiancee's father is a farmer and I think he's one of the greatest people I know.


    No matter what I do with my life, from writing books to scientific achievements, I can assure you I'll be fueled on bourbon, local cigars, horse racing, and Kentucky basketball. Guess I can never escape my roots, hah!
     
  11. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #11
    right on brother, or sister (i don't know your gender)

    but i love it when i go to the local law school hangout and drink budweiser and smoke a cigar while the rest are drinking merlot or some super expensive beer i cannot pronounce

    when the law students get drunk, they talk about getting a porsche, but i would love nothing better than a horse

    and like the dixie chick's song, i do live in the same zip code as my parents and i don't find anything wrong with that...well, outside of the fact that the big city lawyers make 10 times more than us ;)
     
  12. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #12
    Looking only at monetary and tax policies:

    With respect to politics and party labels, my view of the period from around 1940 to around the middle 1990s is that the conservatives wanted policies that allowed one to keep what one had earned. The liberals wanted policies for distribution of wealth. So, conservatives went Republican; the liberals went Democrat by party label. The last dozen years have seen Republican party power move away from the old-style conservatism.

    So I don't judge party worth by yuppiness or possession of wealth. After all, most of those rich Hollywood folks are Democratic supporters, aren't they? I've seen as many liberal yuppies as I have conservative yuppies.

    I grew up in a mx of town and farming/ranching. Plowed behind a horse. Doctored screwworms in calves. Cowboyed cows out of mesquite thickets--but went on to get an engineering degree.

    Seen a bit of the world. Mabuhay/konbanwa/anyehashimika to guten tag/bon nour and buenas dias.

    The funny thing to me about today's city folks and their attitudes about farmers and ranchers is how little fact is actually known. Hard to make it in today's world as a farmer or rancher without computers and the Internet. I know one ranch where they keep track of their 800 Herefords at roundup time via laptop while on horseback. Age, number of calves, apparent health, all that data which helps determine whether to keep or sell.

    The term Redneck originated in the south, among poor farm workers. Poor folks in the 19th century were rarely educated beyond some minimum level, and with the poor communications and roadways of that era, had little knowledge of the outside world. The greatest amount of change for the bwetter came in the period from the beginning of WW I to the end of WW II. Men and women both in vast numbers met new people and new ideas in the--to them--outside world.

    We've gone from 50% of the workforce on-farm prior to WW II to hardly 3% today--yet the "redneck" appellation is still held to apply to computer-literate farm/ranch people. Go figure.

    Stereotypical redneck behavior nowadays is far more of an urban thing.

    'Rat
     
  13. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #13
    hey desertrat,

    great to see you here (my old handle was jefhatfield when i started the political talk here in 2000) and i fondly remember our debates

    so for every rich hollywood democrat, how many nearby rich orange county people are there to cancel out their vote? add in rich san diego residents and you have almost the population of an entire mid sized state of very wealthy republicans

    and as for rich hollywood types, i can think of a couple of gop california governors who came from those big studio lots who were named ronnnie and arnold (that example only half works because ronnie was an outspoken democrat in his hollywood days)
     
  14. yellow Moderator emeritus

    yellow

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    #14
    Yet despite living here in the south for 18 years I am still a "Yankee", a moniker not given out of love, I assure you.
     
  15. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #15
    my brother moved to virginia, just outside of d.c. and luckily, a small percentage of the people born in northern virginia there have a southern accent so he fits in with his rather bland california accent

    again, the accent in northern virginia is probably light years away from alabama and mississippi
     
  16. iJohnHenry macrumors P6

    iJohnHenry

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    #16
    I am so far from a red-neck it's not even funny, but I do like Jeff, and friends, in this skit. :D
     
  17. CorvusCamenarum macrumors 65816

    CorvusCamenarum

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    #17
    Could be worse...could be carpetbagger. ;)
     
  18. ErikCLDR macrumors 68000

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    #18
    Trust me when I say this. There are rednecks in Connecticut. :D

    I am not one of them, but they are out and about up here in the north. There is a town next to my town that has about 2,000 people so their is no high school for their 20 high school students so they come to my town's high school (culture shock). I can say that 90% of them are rednecks.

    More like redneck wannabees I guess. A few of them have confederate flag decals on their 1980's 4" lifted pickup trucks with 33" mud tires. I hope they do realize 1) confederate flags can be seen to represent racist thoughts and 2) They are in Union territory
     
  19. SMM macrumors 65816

    SMM

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    #19
    If you do not want to read an old time yarn, move on: SMM

    Funny you should mention that. When I was at training, in Memphis, I ran into a boot camp buddy. He wa the kind of guy who could make friends with a Bengal Tiger. He was from Sheridan, AR. It was a couple hour drive from Memphis (as I recall).

    Anyway, the first time we went to visit there, Sandy dropped me off at the only public concern in town. During the day, it was a combination of a store, gas station, Post Office, Town Hall, Police Station/Jail, Doctor/Dentist Office and BBQ takeout (they are everywhere in the South). In the evening, the store, PO, and Town Hall, and clinic close, and it turns into Bar/Pool Hall. Sandy dropped me at the bar and said he would be back in half-hour with his girlfriend and her sister. I went in and had a seat at the bar. The silence was deafening. As I recall there were about 20-30 'good ole' boys' in the place. Within a very short period of time, everyone of them (seemingly) managed to 'accidentally' bump into me.

    I kept wishing Sandy would show up. The minutes seemed to take an hour each. Finally, Sandy did show up, and made a group introduction. He then took me to personally around and introduced me to his relatives (half the dudes there. The atmosphere changed immediately. I told them I was from WA State, which drew many glazed stares. They all called me Yankee, but in a non-confrontational way. I made several trips there with Sandy, eventually meeting folk from the farms, and other small towns. His girlfriend kept trying to 'hit on me', which was a very uncomfortable situation. I was worried he would notice it, and leave me to deal with the 'good ole boys'. Fortunately, one day in Memphis, he told me, "Jean Sue" has taken a fancy to you, and I appreciate you trying to ignore her, in a nice way. Don't worry about it", he said with a wink. You are the first new shiny thing she has seen in a long time. Hell, the furthest she has ever been from home is Little Rock. Just don't worry about it.

    Every time I went 'home' with Sandy, I was always called "Yankee'. That never changed.
     
  20. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #20
    63Dot, what difference does it make about who lives where with how much folding stuff in their billfold?

    I dunno. I've never paid much attention to what other folks have. If they're rich, hey, great! That's what this country is all about. You work smart as well as hard and you get ahead. Good for them. Me, I mind my own business and do my thing. Money just never was all that important, compared to my freedom to come and go when and where it suits me.

    Bill Gates and Warren Buffet don't have a danged thing I want.

    But what I do want to do is keep as much of the money I earn as I can. I worked for it; it's mine. In general, the Republicans haven't tried to take it away from me as much as have the Democrats. In general, past Republican monetary policies haven't negatively impacted the buying power of the dollar as much as have the Democrats. ("In general" does not equate to "always".)

    From the FWIW department: Data from the campaign contribution records in the last two presidential elections showed that more people made small contributions to the Republican Party than to the Democrat party. More large individual contributions ($100,000 and up) were made to the Democrats than to the Republicans. (From the website of the federal campaign fund deal; I disremember the exact name.) That says to me that this "big guy/little guy" stuff is BS.

    Simple enough: Trying to get into my billfold makes my old red neck light up and glow.
     
  21. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #21
    you are in texas, listen to john hightower

    ...that's all that i can say
     
  22. solvs macrumors 603

    solvs

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    #22
    I realize you put that qualifier in there, but at least with the last couple of Presidencies, despite the Dems "taking more away from you" at least they aren't spending on credit, which does make the buying power of the dollar less (see the current dollar's value).
     
  23. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #23
    desertrat is taking the dollar at face value, mathematically, and not seeing the rise in inflation and the lessening world value of the product of 100 cents (aka: the us dollar)

    the GOP is definitely the party that favors the rich, and unless desertrat, in terms of real dollars, year after year, is at the very top few percent, then he is taking it without vaseline and not knowing it
     
  24. GfPQqmcRKUvP macrumors 68040

    GfPQqmcRKUvP

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    #24

    I suspect desertrat is in the same economic camp as I am: We want taxes lower in general. You don't have to make a million a year to want that.
     
  25. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #25
    let's say you are working class or middle class or even upper middle class

    do you think those groups did better in the clinton years or the george w bush years?

    how many us jobs got outsourced in the last 8 years? (yes, other presidents supported outsourcing, to a point)

    how much of our taxpayer money has gone to iraq?

    and why is a larger percentage of us tax monies coming from those who make less money?
     

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