I have a PB, 1ghz, G4 I'd like to buy new or would upgrading work?.

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by connor02, Jul 7, 2010.

  1. connor02 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2010
    #1
    I now have a 6 year old PowerBook with 1 ghz, G4, 512MB, 15", running OS 10.3.9. I use it to run my small (me) business (Quickbooks). Read & send email. Make bid proposals with Appleworks and fax them to General Contractors. I use Excel for my spreadsheets. And read blue prints for bidding job. Personally I like using it itunes, iphoto & reading.

    My problems are: I can't always open email, some email graphics don't open up, I can't download songs from itunes, some web pages don't want to load (ESPN) I get the beach ball and other minor stuff. Yes the main reason (business) for using my PB still works, but for how much longer?

    Would I be better off buying a new macbook pro or trying to upgrade my old one? Thanks for any thoughts.




    I'd like to buy new or would upgrading work?
     
  2. miles01110 macrumors Core

    miles01110

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    The Ivory Tower (I'm not coming down)
    #2
    I don't think upgrading is going to solve your problems in a satisfactory way. I'd just buy new after 6 years.
     
  3. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #3
    x2, not worth sinking money into it.
     
  4. connor02 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2010
    #4
    OK, I'm leaning toward new. Would a 17" MBP vs. a 15" MBP make a big enough difference for the money when it come to veiwing blue prints online? And does buying refurbished make any sense? Thanks
     
  5. aeboi macrumors 65816

    aeboi

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2009
    Location:
    Bay Area
    #5
    buying refurbished is fine, it's cheaper and comes with the same warranty

    some just like theirs to be brand spanking new
     
  6. chris2k5 macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2010
    #6
    I say go for refurb unless you are a college student who gets the discount and free iPod.

    Also, go with the 15" unless you MUST MUST MUST have the 17".
     
  7. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #7
    You may want the 17" for the blueprints, or at least the hi-res 15".

    You really can't go wrong with refurb, but personally I always buy brand new. Sure refurbs are cheaper, but the resale is proportionally less so you may as well have a brand-spanking new machine and more or less lose roughly the same amount of cash at resale as you would on buying a cheaper refurb and getting less on the resale of that.
     
  8. EHVio macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    May 13, 2010
    #8
    Honestly, for your uses, you very well might be satisfied with the MacBook. It doesn't sound like you need gobs and gobs of processing power... The screen size would be the only issue there, but you could get an external display to hook it up to at home (even a nice big 1080p LCD HDTV ;) ), upgrade to 4GB RAM, and still come in under the price of a 15" MBP... Food for thought :D
     
  9. pjcforpres2020 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    #9
    Why would you get less on the resale?
     
  10. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #10
    because it costs less to begin with and its refurbished?
     
  11. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #11
    I'm sorry but this is just wrong. It's the same machine as a new one, so when selling it the value is going to be the same. Your argument is like saying that if someone used an education discount they should see a similar decrease in value when they sell it because they paid less to begin with.
     
  12. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #12
    Ok dude.

    Your example is flawed, and it's pretty obvious. I shouldn't have to point out that a new machine with an education discount is the same as a new machine without an education discount, whereas a refurbished machine that's been returned, torn apart, inspected, parts replaced, and repackaged in generic plain packaging is not the same as a new machine sealed off the factory line.

    Why would a machine that costs less to begin with net the same in resale?

    Or here's the million dollar question--if it's the exact same, why does Apple sell it for less themselves? Because Apple understands it's not as valuable to the market as a new machine.
     
  13. iBookG4user macrumors 604

    iBookG4user

    Joined:
    Jun 27, 2006
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    #13
    Ok, tell me, if I set a refurbished MacBook Pro and a new MacBook Pro side by side, without seeing the box, would you be able to tell the difference? I didn't think so. And my example is not flawed, I simply used your logic,
    When using the education discount, the Mac costs less to begin with ;)

    Back OT; OP I would also suggest that you buy refurbished if you cannot use the student discount. The PowerBook is so old nowadays that it is simply not worth sinking money into it to prolong its life.
     
  14. pjcforpres2020 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    #14
    I think a used car is a better analogy for why it wouldn't resell for less. Apple sells it for less because it isn't 100% new, but when reselling down the road that will not matter, since at that point both units are used. Just like buying a used car, then reselling it later on, it will sell the same as any other in the same condition, whether bought new or used.
     
  15. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #15
    Keep telling yourself that.

    At the end of the day the non-refurbed machine will still go for more, unless we are talking about 3-4 years later when the machine has long past reached the bottom of its depreciation curve, when neither machine is worth anything.

    Personally I'd consider myself a sucker if I choosed a used refurb for the same price as a used non-refurb side by side, but that's just me.

    I buy new, I sell for a high price later. I don't like anyone's used/reconditioned anything, just personal preference, refurbs are great machines.

    EDIT: The car example is no good either, that's no different than if I buy a computer new, sell it to someone, and they sell it later vs. someone who buys it new and sells it at the same time I sell mine later. Unless the used car was accepted by the factory as a lemon law return, reconditioned, and then resold, it's an irrelevant example.
     
  16. pjcforpres2020 macrumors regular

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2010
    #16
    Actually it is darn near perfect, except even better would be if it was a certified used car. You don't seem to be grasping the fact that doesn't matter if you buy it new or refurbished, the second you receive it, it is the exact same thing, a used Macbook Pro. And the market will not see it any other way, either. Heck, I have seen people advertise the fact that their used Macbook Pro they are selling was refurbished by Apple themselves, as a positive.

    Also, just like with a certified used car, the only reason Apple sells it for less is because it is a used machine. The refurbished machines go for more than a traditional used model, because Apple is backing it up with 1yr of Applecare, and putting their neck on the line that it is like new. Just as when, say, BMW sells you a certified used car, you are paying a premium for it because BMW is backing it up with a new warranty, and putting their neck on the line that it is like new.

    Adding to the car analogy, in both cases items have likely been fixed or replaced. And as already alluded to, in both cases certified/refurb carry a premium price over a traditional used item... and so forth.

    Not to be an ass, but you really don't seem to understand the idea of depreciation, and the fact that in both cases; bought new or refurbished, when you resell it down the road, either 1 day, 1year, or 5 years, you are selling the exact same thing, a used MBP, that will bring a price that the market place deems fit based on its specs and condition. Just because you bought it brand new doesn't mean you will get more for it than if you bought it refurbished, by Apple mind you, simply because you paid more in the first place... all it means is that you paid more for it in the first place.

    This is why I NEVER will buy a new car, unless I have money to burn. Second you drive a new car off the lot, it is worth the exact same as any other with the same miles and in the same condition, bought new or used, or certified used.
     
  17. OrganMusic macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago
    #17
    Actually if you upgraded that to Leopard, you'd at least be able to run a newer version of iTunes and be able to handle more attachments.

    I'm typing this on my old G4 Cube, 450 mHz, 576 Mb ram. It's a touch slow at times, but on a 1 ghz g4 I'd think it would be fairly capable at your tasks. See if you can find a used leopard DVD cheap somewhere.
     
  18. puma1552 macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Nov 20, 2008
    #18
    As a chemical engineer, I'm pretty sure I have a grasp on basic depreciation curves and other things far, far, far more complex than day 1 of Econ 101. Please don't insult my intelligence further. Thanks though.

    It won't sell for the same price. How do I know? Experience. I've had refurb Apple stuff in the past when I was younger and it was all that was available (the season had passed for what I wanted and it was the only option), now I won't buy them at all. Again nothing wrong with them, no problems, good warranty--but the fact remains that in my experience I never, ever got the same amount as a non-refurbed, no matter how perfect it is.

    This is a stupid argument and I'm not going to continue. My experience suggests otherwise, and that's really the end of the story as far as I'm concerned. Furthermore I am someone who would not pay the same for a used refurb as a used machine that's not refurb; thus, I am part of the market and I am representative of a fair number of people in the market. A refurb is also a harder sell, even if you get your money back simply because a lot of people will dismiss it because it was originally a refurb, regardless of whether or not Apple's refurbs are great, if for no other reason than there are a LOT of people out there new to Macs who don't know these things so will pass over it without a second thought. There's a reason why you hear people say "I kept all the boxes and cellophane wrappings and I always get top dollar by doing so and showing how good I take care of stuff." Nobody would bother buying new from Apple if refurbs truly sold for the same later. Personally at this point in life I can't imagine dropping over $2k on something refurbished, may as well just go new but again it's personal preference so it doesn't reall matter, eh?

    Anyway moving on, back OT.
     
  19. ic1 macrumors member

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2005
    #19
    Sadly, the consensus of opinion here is probably right and your G4 has probably reached the end of the trail (yes, you could upgrade to as recent a version as 10.5 but why bother?) BTW I'm posting from my 5-yr old PB which still serves me well but with my new MBP has become my "learn about the insides of laptops" machine.

    I noted one of the non-business things you use your current G4 for is reading (e-books and PDFs, I guess). This aside, is there any reason you are limiting yourself to replacing a laptop with a laptop? The US Apple refurb store for example, lists two iMacs at cheaper than the cheapest 15" MBP and either of them would do what you want plus the increased screen size would make reading blueprints a sight easier.
     
  20. connor02 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2010
    #20
    I agree, but there are times I travel out of city for work and I bring my PB w/ me. And I like the ability to move from my office in the house to other rooms in my house. Some one early in this thread posted you could hook up your MPB to a TV sceen. Is this true? And How? Thanks for all the help, I see other 15'' MBP in my future. It will be hard to say goodbye to this old boy.
     
  21. OrganMusic macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2008
    Location:
    Chicago
    #21
    Well any mac can be hooked up to a TV one way or another. You just need the right cables. It's much easier with current (HDTV) TVs since they usually have VGA inputs, though using a DVI to HDMI adapter or other such is even better.
     
  22. connor02 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2010
    #22
    I do have a 2 year old HDTV so what would I need & do.
     
  23. iTwitch macrumors 6502a

    iTwitch

    Joined:
    Mar 30, 2006
    Location:
    East of the Mississippi
    #23
    I use to hook my iBook G4 to my HDTV. Does your HDTV have a VGA port? If so you'll need a VGA cable, hook one end to the HDTV and the other end to the adapter that should have come with your PB . Finally, attach the other end of the adapter to the PB, turn on HDTV and change the input to PC and away you go.
     
  24. Batt macrumors 65816

    Batt

    Joined:
    Dec 17, 2007
    Location:
    Syracuse, NY
    #24
    Unless you point out the different serial number denoting a refurb, a prospective buyer can't tell the difference.
     

Share This Page