I want to Buy a new "USED" Apple Cpu. What do you recommend. Please Help

Discussion in 'Buying Tips and Advice' started by Quijano187, Jan 14, 2015.

  1. Quijano187 macrumors member

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    Jan 14, 2015
    #1
    Hi. I want to buy a New used Apple Cpu. I don't really care if its an iMac , mac mini or laptop. What i do want to make sure is that its the most upgradable. That catch is i don't want an old mac pro.. They are too big and a little too old. So What are your guys recommendations. I do have 2008 iMac 20 2.4ghz. I have upgraded the Hd to SSD already and added a second display already ..

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    ANY OPINONS or suggestion are GREATLY APPRECIATED
     
  2. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

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    #2
    And therein lies your problem. The older Mac Pros were, by a considerable margin, the most upgradeable Macs on the market. By comparison, all current Mac models are very "locked down".

    I'd go for a refurb higher-spec Mac Mini-- 2012 or earlier, one with the bottom plate that is easily removed. iMacs with the ultrathin edges are notoriously tedious/difficult to upgrade, from what I've read. Earlier iMacs may be too slow to be worth your upgrade time and/or parts cost, depending on what you ultimately plan to do with it.
     
  3. velocityg4 macrumors 68040

    velocityg4

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    #3
    All you can really add to any of them internally is RAM and storage space. I imagine it won't be long until the RAM and SSD are soldered onto all models. The rest is just adding peripherals. If you want something upgradeable build a hackintosh. If you build them right they can be very reliable.
     
  4. apphotography macrumors regular

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    #4
    You can upgrade the new Mac Pro but you have to take apart the whole machine to do that.
     
  5. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #5
    Early 2009 Mac Pro. Upgradable and not that old relative to the phrase "older Mac Pros", as I agree; Early 2008 and earlier had way too many issues to make them even remotely appealing options.
     
  6. Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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    #6
    Im leaning towards a 2009 imac to 2013 imac. I have recently found out that most of them the cpu is upgradable and also graphics cards as well. Now I'm just trying to find out which model for me is best to try to buy and upgrade for my money.
     
  7. Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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    #7
    Can you try to convince me why this is the better route?

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    So your saying i should really consider a mac mini 2012 and not waste my time?
     
  8. Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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    #8
    ANY MORE OPINIONS or suggestions are gladly appreciated!! :cool::cool:
     
  9. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

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    #9
    Why you want to do this? How much processing power you are looking for?

    you can buy a used 2009 Mac Pro with less than $1000 (dual processor model), and can be maxed out by two X5690 to 12 Cores (24 Threads) 3.46 GHz (Turbo 3.73), which cost you another $650. The CPU architecture is old, but the processing power is not, only the max out nMP can barely beat this cMP's multi processing power. Of course, if you only need the single core performance, go for the new iMac.

    Otherwise, I don't think that you can get any other Mac with this processing power but a lower price. (For info, a used single CPU 2009 Mac Pro cost <$700, and the W3690 <$300)

    On the other hand, the old Mac Pro actually can use some newest hardware which is not available on any other Mac yet. e.g. The GTX 980 graphic card.

    So far, the cMP (NOT the nMP) has the fastest storage option. A $10 PCIe adaptor can make the cMP use some SSD that has 1200MB/s read and 1400MB/s write speed. And most likely the cMP will be the very 1st Mac that can use the upcoming super high speed SSD.

    Thunderbolt is not available on the cMP, but just $20 and then the cMP will have USB3.0 capability (or 3.1 later). Moreover, Wi-Fi ac, BT4.0, SATA 3.0 ... are all available on the cMP.

    Yes, it's old, it's from 2009, but due to it's upgradability, it's hard to say a properly upgraded cMP is "too old".

    However, I can't persuade you that it's not too big :eek:

    Anyway, since I don't know the answer of my 1st two questions. So, that I can hardly give you any valuable suggestion. But I guess the 2009 Mac Pro can actually do much more than what you believe.
     
  10. BittenApple macrumors 6502a

    BittenApple

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    #10
    You really can't upgrade the GPU on the iMac. You must be thinking of the Mac Pro.
     
  11. h9826790 macrumors 604

    h9826790

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    #11
  12. gooser macrumors 6502

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    #12
    consider a mid 2009 macbook. 2.13ghz model. easy to take apart and time proven to be a reliable model.
     
  13. redheeler macrumors 603

    redheeler

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    #13
    I don't understand why you're so intent on upgrades. A 27" late 2013 iMac, even with a non-upgradable GPU, should handle almost anything.
     
  14. dXTC macrumors 68020

    dXTC

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    #14
    Some of the upgrading you've mentioned, such as the graphics card, would require removal of the front glass on newer-model iMacs. From what I've read on iFixit and other sites, this is not a task to be taken lightly. Putting the glass back on without getting dust between it and the LCD screen surface... hoo boy.

    The iMac isn't a run-of-the-mill AIO computer; most iMacs' internals are configured very tightly like laptops. You might not be able to get a newer GPU that will fit in the space given.

    Since iMacs of a certain model year are likely to be more expensive than a Mac mini of the same year and comparable spec, purchasing the mini might allow you to afford better-spec'd upgrade parts.
     
  15. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #15
    That is just such a terrible idea. Take a look at the work involved and the limited options. it's not like any of them take any gpu or cpu. There are some that held up better than others. Note the imac graveyard threads and a couple years that carried repair programs. As for cpu upgrades, have you even compared options on a given generation? As for cpu, you know that your options are limited to those that fit the socket that was used in that model, right? The options for that 2009 are totally different from those in a 2013 model. The same is basically true with gpus. There have been a couple where people made successful upgrades, but you would have to look at those that will actually work and see whether they're cost effective. Once again you're still pretty limited. It's not like you can take any gpu and plug it into any imac. This entire thing just sounds like a terrible idea unless you can obtain all required components for little money.

    You can't upgrade the mini's cpu. Notebook chips have been soldered for a while by specification. They aren't in the mac pro, because they aren't available that way. The only sensible thing to tinker with really is a mac pro, specifically a 2009 or later for maximum compatibility. This is assuming the OP wishes to stick with a Mac. I have to wonder if he just wants to take something apart, because no upgrade will bring a 2009 imac to the performance of a 2013. The gpu options would still be slower. The fastest core 2 duo cpu that can be fit into that model will be slower than the slowest 2013 i5. I can't figure this one out.
     
  16. Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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    #16
    You have pointed out some valid points to me and its something i can't ignore now on my next purchase. The reason i want to do this is for a new hobby. I want a new project. Processing power is yet to be determine but the more always seems to be better. I would love to read links on what you exactly brought up before. Thanks for taking the time to show me your view.

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    This is exactly what i was talking about when i mentioned being able to upgrade the 2009 iMac and on . From what i understand the 27 inch models have the cpu in a Socket type not Soldered type and also able to buy the new graphics if i ever wanted to upgrade it. What I don't really know is Which model i should be looking for to get the fastest cpu I can buy in the future since i won't be able to afford something that fast now.

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    i just like knowing there is a possibility.

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    My first 2008 iMac which I'm using now i had to replace the hard drive since i received the iMac with a failed HD. Its really not that bad to take a part as people make it to seem. Just gotta take your time and cross your fingers lol.
     
  17. Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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    #17
    Maybe you right that this might be bad idea but you even said it yourself unless I can get it cheap and I would have to do my research. You guys have made greats points on if I do even wanna be tinkering I should just get a 2009 Mac pro and I'm now putting serious consideration to it but also i just Love the 27 iMac. I cannot afford a new 2015 model or even a 2014, I seen some good deals for 2013 models but that got me thinking of what other options are out there so I figured i would ask your guys first and see what kind of respond i get.
     
  18. Quijano187, Jan 18, 2015
    Last edited: Jan 18, 2015

    Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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  19. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #19
    I would certainly keep an eye out and not jump at the first thing. Some of the 2009 mac pros go fairly cheap, and they can be firmware flashed and upgraded. It is more difficult to upgrade the dual models compared to the singles ones (see some of the guides on this site), but a cheap quad 2009 --> 6 core + decent gpu upgrade is probably decent. Remember that if you're buying a machine that is several years old, logic board failure is always a possibility. Even with mac pros, people have experienced dead gpus and logic boards. The upside with the mac pro is that while gpus are a common point of failure, they're easily replaceable on a mac pro.
     
  20. Flynnstone macrumors 65816

    Flynnstone

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    #20
    Since you want a project ... why not go the mackintosh route?

    I have a 2009 iMac. I upgraded the HD. Bit of pain in the butt.
    Also a 2010 MacBook. Upgraded the HD to SSD. Awesome! "Upgraded" the keyboard to a new one (daughter spilt something on it). Surprising the performance of this laptop still. Definitely faster than the iMac, but not that much slower than my 2014 HP Z15 work computer.
     
  21. Yebubbleman macrumors 68030

    Yebubbleman

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    #21
    I don't know, I think what I put there ought to be convincing enough. You can't upgrade anything other than the RAM in an iMac unless you REALLY know what you're doing and even then, it's more of a pain in the ass than it's really worth and the performance gains are minimal anyway.

    The Early 2009 Mac Pro is modern enough and certainly capable enough to hold its own. It's super simple to upgrade everything (storage, graphics cards, RAM, CPU, etc.), plus you have the flexibility of finding a 4 or 8 core machine. It's honestly tons better than anything you could do in an iMac.
     
  22. Quijano187 thread starter macrumors member

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  23. Macsonic macrumors 65816

    Macsonic

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    #23
    I've used to own 2 iMacs and have used other iMacs in other offices. One of my problems is the recurring dirt or smudging on the screen monitors. It was distracting specially with image editing and video playbacks. https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2300580?start=675&tstart=0 There was time after my screen was newly replaced by Apple, after 6 months there were smudges again. LIke others suggested, a 2009 or 2010 classic Mac Pro would be a good option and you can select your own monitor. I also prefer matte screen than the glossy screen of the iMac. I know you mentioned the classic Mac Pro is old hardware. New iMacs and new Mac Pros have their own problems and glitches that something to take note of. LIke "line artifacts" in video render in the New Mac Pro or Illustrator being sluggish in the 5K iMac.

    https://forums.adobe.com/thread/1626784
    https://forums.creativecow.net/thread/3/960693

    Also to keep in mind is software limitations and not taking advantage of newer hardware. And at the end of the day, how much to spend on the machine and which is the most upgradeable.
     
  24. Blackstick macrumors 6502

    Blackstick

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    #24
    Retinas and Airs only can be upgraded with larger hard drives, and not officially from Apple- places like OWC/Macsales.com do sell larger hard drives. The RAM is soldered to the main logic board, so buy one with 8gb if you can.

    iMacs aren't the toughest thing to upgrade, but I would never say it's "fun" to suction cup off the glass front panel and remove the display, getting it back together without dust settling in is more art than science, and impossible to get perfect.

    The only real model that allows for true upgrades on some parts (besides hackintosh), are mac pros and where I'd focus my efforts. Try to get a good price on a 2010 or 2012, those will last a good long time.

    It's a fool's errand to think a portable mac, mini or iMac is a good machine to buy if you're a tinkerer... They're more like appliances, I expect my 2013 iMac to get me to 2020, but come that time I won't be looking to upgrade anything inside, just cut losses and sell it.
     
  25. kelon111 macrumors 6502

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    #25
    Apple doesn't make CPUs.
    They get their CPUs from a company called Intel.

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    The newer Retina and Air machines can only take SSDs that Apple customized for them.
     

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