If I am in a LTE area per coverage map...

unlimitedx

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 15, 2010
635
0
Should I always be in LTE? I'm on AT&T and I am fully blanketed by LTE in all directions. Why does the cellular keep switching back between 4g and lte?
 

ROLLTIDE1

macrumors 68000
Sep 12, 2012
1,789
546
Cause the Coverage maps are not accurate ! Why not get a cellular amp and external antenna and fix your problems ?
 

jbromer

macrumors 6502a
Jul 13, 2008
612
7
MD, USA
I think the coverage maps are a bit ambitious on the websites. I "should" have LTE all over where I live and during my commute. In reality, it comes in goes. Tower range varies etc.
 

BlueKhufu

macrumors regular
Nov 27, 2010
182
23
Should I always be in LTE? I'm on AT&T and I am fully blanketed by LTE in all directions. Why does the cellular keep switching back between 4g and lte?
Here is the AT&T disclaimer for their coverage map.. (And I'm sure it's standard fare for all carriers)

"The AT&T's coverage viewer depicts a high-level approximation of wireless coverage. There are gaps in coverage that are not shown by this high-level approximation. Actual coverage may differ from map graphics and may be affected by terrain, weather, foliage, buildings and other construction, signal strength, high-usage periods, customer equipment and other factors. AT&T does not guarantee coverage and our coverage maps are not intended to show actual customer performance on the network, nor are they intended to show future network needs or build requirements inside or outside of AT&T's existing coverage areas. Coverage maps also may include areas served by unaffiliated carriers, and may depict licensed areas rather than an approximation of their coverage."
 

SandboxGeneral

Moderator emeritus
Sep 8, 2010
26,256
9,553
Detroit
Coverage area varies a lot due to terrain and foliage in certain areas, even though the map shows coverage. Their online maps are more of a broad generalization of covered areas. More refined maps are capable of being run, but its not prudent for them to publish those.

A cellular amp, sometimes referred to as a BDA (bi-directional amplifier) is a device installed in buildings, usually, with an external antenna outside and another broadcast antenna indoors, which boosts the signal of a selected frequency band.
I used one successfully for a Sprint air card for a while, and also have one at my office to boost a certain non-cellular signal in the basement.
 

twowinns

macrumors member
Jun 10, 2010
92
8
McKinney, Texas
A cellular amp, sometimes referred to as a BDA (bi-directional amplifier) is a device installed in buildings, usually, with an external antenna outside and another broadcast antenna indoors, which boosts the signal of a selected frequency band.
I used one successfully for a Sprint air card for a while, and also have one at my office to boost a certain non-cellular signal in the basement.
Thanks.

Doesn't sound like I could set this up without my employer's permission or assistance. They have something like this for Verizon, since that's the carrier the Company uses for business phones. Unfortunately, for this situation, I'm with AT&T.
 

SandboxGeneral

Moderator emeritus
Sep 8, 2010
26,256
9,553
Detroit
Thanks.

Doesn't sound like I could set this up without my employer's permission or assistance. They have something like this for Verizon, since that's the carrier the Company uses for business phones. Unfortunately, for this situation, I'm with AT&T.
It shouldn't hurt to ask though. Maybe they'd consider the AT&T Microcell for the office. Are there many other AT&T users in your office?
 
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