I'm not crazy. The rMBP keyboard reaches 48 celsius / 118 fahrenheit


sinc26

macrumors newbie
Nov 25, 2013
16
0
It appears the aluminum surrounding the keyboard reaches 48C. The keys themselves are ~39C. If anything, this looks like normal quad-core laptop load temperatures to me. Even the 1.4" thick Thinkpad W530 will reach 50C surface temperatures (although the W530 is better off since its plastic case does not spread heat around as much).

There are only a few large workstation and gaming laptops that can stay cool with a 45W processor under load.

has anyone considered the effects of dissipating near air near 50C straight to your 2k display?
Yes, people have. LCD panels have very high operating temperatures. With some quick googling, standard TFT LCD panels have a max operating temperature of 70C.

The MBP 15 does become obviously hot under load, and this is something people should consider when buying. It is, however, not some kind of burn hazard or major design flaw.
 

sixrom

macrumors 6502a
Nov 13, 2013
707
1
Apples famous for sacrificing cooling in favor of their obsession for stylishly thin products.

So if yours runs hot you can be assured it's genuine Apple. :)
 

ElderBrE

macrumors regular
Apr 14, 2004
242
11
I can heat up a room in winter with only a Mac Pro under no load, with the rMBP I might be able to go shirtless this season.
 

Wuiffi

macrumors 6502a
Oct 6, 2011
685
78
the one my girlfriend gets 50 degrees hot. on the cpu
and now I am off to the sauna. 95 degrees celsius :)
 

leman

macrumors G3
Oct 14, 2008
9,972
4,553
I can heat up a room in winter with only a Mac Pro under no load, with the rMBP I might be able to go shirtless this season.
Alone the CPU if your Mac Pro generates more heat than the whole laptop. I suggest you stick to the former if you want a fancy heater #
 

GoCubsGo

macrumors Nehalem
Feb 19, 2005
35,743
141
Oh I don't know, telling people who likely never called you crazy that you're not may indicate otherwise. ;)

The laptops I've owned from Apple have all gotten quite warm just surfing and playing music. My PowerBook couldn't rest directly on my lap without a pillow because of it. I've considered this normal for Apple.
 

willph

macrumors newbie
Nov 4, 2013
7
0
My new rMBP 15" does get hot under gaming sessions or some HD video playback. (i wonder if i can scramble an egg)
However under normal browsing and every day kind of stuff, it only gets slightly warm, or stays cool
 

sabbyp

macrumors regular
Oct 26, 2013
139
1
It's completely fine, what do you expect for what's in it/the size it is?

if it's uncomfortable on your lap, put some pants on :rolleyes:

Macsumo, what's the deal with these threads you keep making? Why are you so intent on bashing this machine?
 

marivaux

macrumors member
Nov 3, 2013
94
1
Quote from OP's link:

"Nevertheless, using it for normal purposes, the Retina MacBook Pro is indeed very cool and silent."

Also, the headline of the article is "Retina MacBook Pro Runs Cool And Silent."

So, I'm no Apple Fanboy (I use them, but plenty of things about Apple computers bother me), but if you're going to provide "evidence" and insist something is true, do it in context. The article says that the computer it will be uncomfortable on your lap during those times you put the computer _under extreme pressure_ and that you will "feel the heat" (not burn yourself). Not a surprise.

Most of the links offering "proof" from the OP's other "professionals computer" thread are also links to someone making a point, followed by long discussions about the validity of that point. It's not crazy to look at a data point, but it's hardly scientific to take an out-of-context data point and use it as evidence of a problem without looking at the overall picture (Like: Does it reach that temperature once in a blue moon under a stress test? Do other comparable computers under the same stress test reach comparable temperatures? Etc.)
 
Last edited:

Wishbrah

macrumors regular
Oct 20, 2013
234
8
Uh oh, MacSumo is at it again! Time for a MacSumo-esque response!

In order for the display to melt, that little quad core would have to generate more than 593C to melt the glass of the display. To melt the aluminum, 660C would be needed. That's hot! To melt the liquid crystals in the IPS...oh wait, they're already melted. Shame! Imagining my melting skin mixing with this melt down of industrial design-inspired technology is bringing whiffs of chicken noodle soup from a steel can into my mind, and warmth into my heart. All this talk of heat is getting me flustered, better take off my lead gloves I'm using to type on this MacBook.

Now, obviously the electronics sandwiched within are more sensitive. BUT if the screen is as delicate as your obsession with melting and fire is, it should show signs of trouble within 1 year (disclaimer: arson is bad). That's why you have the 1 year warranty. 3 years if you're really uneasy about it.

P.S. People have reapplied thermal paste and have seen thermal gains. Food for thought (will void warranty, though).
 

leman

macrumors G3
Oct 14, 2008
9,972
4,553
So, I'm no Apple Fanboy (I use them, but plenty of things about Apple computers bother me), but if you're going to provide "evidence" and insist something is true, do it in context. The article says that the computer it will be uncomfortable on your lap during those times you put the computer _under extreme pressure_ and that you will "feel the heat" (not burn yourself). Not a surprise.
Oh, he has been doing this for a while now, quoting articles out of context as 'proof'. You can look into his other thread, where he quotes an article (about a scrolling bug in Mavericks, observed on an iMac) as proof for 'horrible scrolling performance on a rMBP'. Of course, the article didn't even mention the rMBP ;)

@Wishbrah: you made my day, thats really funny :D
 

AirThis

macrumors 6502a
Mar 6, 2012
505
0
It's a great investment. I can use it as a computer and make omelettes on it as well. :cool:
 

john123

macrumors 68020
Jul 20, 2001
2,475
1,223
Some people sure love to whine. I've used my Retina while taxing my GPU and my CPU heavily, at the same time, and never once have I found it "uncomfortable." Previous generations, sure. This one? No way.

Whine. Whine. Whine. Whine. Moan. Moan. Moan. Moan.

There's a pattern.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,244
1,312
While first degree burns happen around 60C/140F, the rMBP reaches 48C/118F. Not only is it quite uncomfortable to use (typing while on lap), has anyone considered the effects of dissipating near air near 50C straight to your 2k display?
IMO, MacBook Pros (under load) have a long history of generating similar temperatures. Below are MacWorld's findings from a 2006 "temperature test", which includes the last generation PowerBook.

I don't see a big difference from the temperature being measured on the rMBPs today. That being the case, you've got a little over seven years of history of people owning "hot" MacBook Pros, so it should be easy for you to do some research and correlate "hot" in terms of effects on on displays, burnt fingers, and drop in sperm count (for men who use these on their laps).

External Temperature Above Keyboard

110.3° - 15-inch MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo/2.16GHz
117.9° - 15-inch MacBook Pro Core 2 Duo/2.33GHz
117.4° - 15-inch MacBook Pro Core Duo/2.16GHz
105.1° - MacBook Core Duo/2GHz
112.5° - 15-inch PowerBook G4/1.67GHz
http://www.macworld.com/article/1053795/mbptemps.html
 

Quu

macrumors 68030
Apr 2, 2007
2,659
4,186
It is interesting how the red heat marks on the display are the same areas worst affected by yellowing on the new rMBP's (I've had four, all with yellowing). I wonder if the heat output directly on that area of the display is what causes the yellowing..
 

thundersteele

macrumors 68030
Oct 19, 2011
2,984
7
Switzerland
I wonder how how the Iris Pro machine gets... it should stay cooler...

Notebookcheck found a maximal surface temperature of 43C on the 13'' rMBP with Iris graphics. Maybe the 15'' can do even better...
 

MacSumo

macrumors regular
Original poster
Nov 26, 2013
129
0
It is interesting how the red heat marks on the display are the same areas worst affected by yellowing on the new rMBP's (I've had four, all with yellowing). I wonder if the heat output directly on that area of the display is what causes the yellowing..
It's quite possible it could be related.

---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Everyone here that says the heat is normal should, perhaps, reconsider their view. How many years does Apple need to "innovate" ? Couldn't they "innovate" by creating a laptop that doesn't overheat, and also has a good display? Everyone here who is disagreeing with me are ingnoring 2 key points: (1) rmbp has a bad cooling design, and (2) the displays are plagued with rampant issues.

Just because you're used to inferior quality (even though it's one of the best that's out there), doesn't make it right.
 

ryanscott6

macrumors newbie
Jan 6, 2004
12
6
Anyone know if the 13" rMBP gets as hot? I recently moved from a 13" 2013 Air to the 15" rMBP and I'm not a big fan of the amount of heat this thing puts off.
 

aristobrat

macrumors G5
Oct 14, 2005
12,244
1,312
Just because you're used to inferior quality (even though it's one of the best that's out there), doesn't make it right.
Doesn't make it right? So what are you suggesting, taking pitch forks and assaulting the Apple engineers out in Cupertino until they design an aluminum notebook that sounds like a F-14 fighter jet when under load so that the case is 10'F cooler?

I don't understand what you're after. Do you just want everyone to agree with you so that you feel better about your opinion? What is your end goal? What do you want? You've stated how you feel about Apple's rMBP line, but seriously, what do you want done about it?