Immortality

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by haxrnick, Feb 20, 2018.

  1. haxrnick macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #1
    As a change of pace here in PRSI I thought I'd bring this subject up. Was googling some stuff and this came up in a link somewhat relevant to what I was searching. I understand from many here that this site isn't to be taken seriously, and that's fine. I'm using more as a base to start the conversation. If what they're saying is remotely true, and I think some of it probably is, in this time of us vs. them mentality that both sides have going on, would you want to live forever?

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5408425/Human-beings-achieve-immortality-2050.html

    TLDR - Anyone born after 1970 could potentially have to option to live "forever".

    I know we have a lot of sci-fi guys/gals here so I'm curious what people think/know on this topic.
     
  2. samcraig macrumors P6

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    #2
    I think it would be disastrous for this planet if people lived forever in any large quantity.
     
  3. haxrnick thread starter macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #3
    I agree. But there will also be improvements in space travel/colonization one would assume.
     
  4. decafjava macrumors 68030

    decafjava

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    #4
    Born in 1966 darn it! :(

    Then again immortality does have many down sides, at least as we imagine it.
     
  5. Mac'nCheese Suspended

    Mac'nCheese

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    #5
    Sure just pop out your stack and put it in a new sleeve. Simply as that.

    But uploading your brain to a computer? That's more of a copy than anything. You will still die but your copy will live on.
     
  6. turbineseaplane macrumors 601

    turbineseaplane

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    #6
    The fact that life is finite is a key ingredient in adding purpose and meaning to so many aspects along the way..

    Plus, at some point, we all are just "out of touch" and it's time for the other generations to have a turn at things.
     
  7. alex2792 macrumors 6502a

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  8. haxrnick thread starter macrumors 6502a

    haxrnick

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    #8
    One super fascinating thing I never thought about really is the ability to basically chip my brain, back it up at all times, then when my body dies "I" could still go on.
     
  9. mudslag macrumors regular

    mudslag

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    #9


    So altered carbon
     
  10. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #10
    If you have a chance on Netflix to check out Mr. Nobody it covers this topic a little



    basically everyone in the future lives forever and he's the last mortal person living, and its a interview with him.
     
  11. mac_in_tosh macrumors 6502

    mac_in_tosh

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    #11
    I don't think it is.
     
  12. Ledgem macrumors 68000

    Ledgem

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    #13
    It's a really interesting concept. I recently read Scythe, which I discovered half-way through is more of a book geared toward teens... but the premise was also about achieving immortality, among other things. What I found really interesting was the book's partial focus on how society itself is completely changed in a generation or two once the concept of death is removed. How things like even artwork and other forms of entertainment from "the age of mortality" can seem strange compared to people who don't need to face death. I think we tend to just imagine what it would be like to live, and live, and live... but we don't consider things like how society would change.
     
  13. DearthnVader macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #14
    I've got a Facebook bot that is set to start posting for me after I'm gone.:p
     
  14. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #15
    I'm thinking of how many times I prayed for The Big One --earthquake, flood, missile strike-- to save me from having to take a pop quiz in history the next day. And how silly that was.

    Now I'm wondering how silly it could be to want to live forever. I suppose one would only do that if able to ensure that life went on with the self in some relatively comfortable physical state and with certain mental and emotional facilities, i.e. ready for challenges but not subjected to existential ones. It's hard to imagine wanting to live forever in the midst of say a civil war where even getting water or a bit of food is not in the cards today. And what about illnesses? We'd just jettison flawed parts and get new ones?

    To me it sounds like we'd be bionic with replaceable parts except for mind and spirit. I can see backups for brains I guess, but the spirit of a human being, what is that about anyway/? How do we back that up? And what do we do if and when we are finally tired of hanging out after a couple thousand recyclings?

    Would there, could there be such a feeling as "I've seen it all now..." even if no one ever died and innovation potential was endless? I have never really understood boredom because to me there's no way to lock up the human mind; my own will at least daydream its way out of a tedious stretch of any given day. Still, not everyone is perennially curious, so... I suspect some of us imagine that stretches of unbearable boredom would be included in an infinite life and we might not like the prospect.

    We need our friends who practice one of the Indian religions that assume reincarnation to chime in here. How much like reincarnation would be our bionic immortality?
     
  15. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    #16
    Don't worry - there are hard biological constraints on human life expectancy. You won't live forever, and neither will your descendants. Better make good use of the time that you do have.

    The real question regarding the future is what happens when robots begin to take over jobs so that there are not enough jobs to go around. That is coming. Rapidly.
     
  16. 0007776 Suspended

    0007776

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    #17
    Probably revolutions that redraw the world map and send our technology back a couple hundred years.
     
  17. TheHateMachine macrumors 6502a

    TheHateMachine

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    #18

    Humanity will be thrust forth into a golden age of technology where everyone's needs are met. However this will be brief as it will all be threatened by the overbearing superiority of the synthetic life we produced during that age. What follows will be a dark age of technology filled with strife and war, wherein AI will be eventually banned and technology will be shunned by most. This will regress us as a society and push us into an even darker age of isolation, feudal states and backwards thinking.

    Eventually, this will lead to a being of great importance that will come forth and usher mankind into a new age of reclamation and unification and as they seek to bring together the fractured remnants of mankind. We will then push out into the stars with the single focus of propagating our species throughout the galaxy, subjugating everything we come across in the stars and fulfilling our destiny to rule everything.
     
  18. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #19
    The thing about that is we're not really sure we're not just an artifact from some previous shot at that made by a different crew, right?
     
  19. TheHateMachine macrumors 6502a

    TheHateMachine

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    #20
    Do you think Elon Musk is the 'being'?
     
  20. decafjava macrumors 68030

    decafjava

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    #21
    You are either a Dune or Warhammer fan or at least familiar with both.

    Would rather Dune myself, Warhammer is just too depressing.

    All this has happened before and will happen again. ;) (BSG quote)

    Sorry I'm a nerd and proud of it.
     
  21. Lioness~ macrumors 65816

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    #22
    I already am immortal, just shifts body once in a while.
    But time before growing up into awareness in each body is kind of boring.

    So I focus on jumping over that part next incarnation :D
     
  22. Herdfan macrumors 6502

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    #23
    I think we are living too long as it is. Medical technology is keeping us alive past the point we are "living" to where many of our older citizens are just existing.
     
  23. LizKat macrumors 601

    LizKat

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    #24
    Ya but the details are probably different in another iteration, i.e. not like a loop through the exact same code. That's what innovation appears to offer, no matter what form or manner it takes up.

    Often true but certainly an individual experience for everyone, and no reason someone who's still enjoying the challenge should feel badly about still taking up space on the planet, at least now when we're not extending life far past the century mark.

    I don't really think it's very practical to try to extend an individual human life indefinitely, with all manner of bionic organ and skeletal replacements whenever needed. Call it rationing or call it whatever else it could be, it doesn't seem appropriate to give a 125-year old human being a third heart transplant or a fourth cornea when there are younger candidates in need of such repair.

    If the parts are bionic, what we are rationing then is space on the planet. Shall I enjoy "my" space at age 140 and on and on, while someone age 3 lives somewhere the way we cage calves for the veal market? Will I have to struggle to defend "my" space at that age? Am I still having fun?

    If we are arrogant enough to think we are indispensable, then we must be humble enough to say perhaps Earth has already missed some great chance whenever one of its billions of citizens had life snuffed out prematurely in war or by natural disaster. Yet here we are, still stumbling along and no one seems to have disproved the merits of those world-wise (as distinct from strictly religious) observations in Ecclesiastes about "a time to be born and a time to die..."
     

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23 February 20, 2018