In the UK, Siri's voice is male. Does anyone else dislike that? A male voice I mean.

I

iFanboy

Guest
Original poster
I really can't work out what the problem is, but the female voice sounds more comfortable to listen to.

Does anyone else not like a male voice for Siri?
 

kre62

macrumors 68020
Jul 12, 2010
2,083
729
Go into siri settings and change it to english US. Problem solved.
 

Lukkee24

macrumors 6502a
Sep 20, 2011
518
123
London
I did find the UK one a little strange at first as well, but after a day or so I got used to it, and now I much prefer the UK one :p.
 
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MacBookPro13"

macrumors 6502a
Jan 25, 2011
590
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Ireland
I am from Ireland and prefer the US voice but she finds me hard to understand at times, considering trying the UK one (default) to improve reliability.
 

Certinfy

macrumors 6502a
Jan 29, 2011
933
0
London
What I hate is the voice, not the fact that it's a male. Always use the Australian or American Siri. :)
 

Stella

macrumors G3
Apr 21, 2003
8,322
4,778
Canada
United States English is miles ahead and better than British English.

Switch to US Eng and you will be fine.
I've tried. It sucked! British english is far more reliable for me.

Different pronunciations between the two... i.e., mom vs mum, data ( dada vs dayta ) etc etc.
 

salacious

macrumors 6502a
May 15, 2011
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BlizzardBolt said:
I really can't work out what the problem is, but the female voice sounds more comfortable to listen to.

Does anyone else not like a male voice for Siri?
And have less reliability. Fantastic!
United States English is miles ahead and better than British English.

Switch to US Eng and you will be fine.
I think youl find uk (original) English, is miles ahead .. Not the us version
 

BlizzardBolt

macrumors 6502
Sep 15, 2011
456
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Mariana Trench
I've tried. It sucked! British english is far more reliable for me.

Different pronunciations between the two... i.e., mom vs mum, data ( dada vs dayta ) etc etc.
300 million people would beg to differ. It will be inevitable that British English would eventually be assimilate with US English sometime in the future.
The meanings are downright bizarre.
Fag = cigarette..
Calling Mum for a parent sounds like a mumble, I am somewhat biased because I am from the US but I'm sure that most people would prefer the US english way of interaction.
 

Zcott

macrumors 68020
Oct 18, 2009
2,302
45
Belfast, Ireland
300 million people would beg to differ. It will be inevitable that British English would eventually be assimilate with US English sometime in the future.
The meanings are downright bizarre.
Fag = cigarette..
Calling Mum for a parent sounds like a mumble, I am somewhat biased because I am from the US but I'm sure that most people would prefer the US english way of interaction.
LOL! Such an American way of looking at the world...
 

Stella

macrumors G3
Apr 21, 2003
8,322
4,778
Canada
300 million people would beg to differ. It will be inevitable that British English would eventually be assimilate with US English sometime in the future.
The meanings are downright bizarre.
Fag = cigarette..
Calling Mum for a parent sounds like a mumble, I am somewhat biased because I am from the US but I'm sure that most people would prefer the US english way of interaction.
Disagree with what? We are talking about SIRI aren't we?

I'm not getting into the differences between UK and American English - they are differences between each other - so what? People coming from British English will equally find phrases strange in US english.
 

wordoflife

macrumors 604
Jul 6, 2009
7,563
32
300 million people would beg to differ. It will be inevitable that British English would eventually be assimilate with US English sometime in the future.
The meanings are downright bizarre.
Fag = cigarette..
Calling Mum for a parent sounds like a mumble, I am somewhat biased because I am from the US but I'm sure that most people would prefer the US english way of interaction.
That is an understatement.
 

kdarling

macrumors P6
300 million people would beg to differ.
A fair number of those 300 million people are Anglophiles and like British accents.

--

As for the male voice, CNN recently had an article that said while most people prefer a female voice, the men in some countries do not.

"One notable exception has been Germany, where BMW was forced to recall a female-voiced navigation system on its 5 Series cars in the late 1990s after being flooded with calls from German men saying they refused to take directions from a woman." - CNN
 

Furifo

macrumors 6502
Jun 1, 2010
276
5
There are people who can distinguish between a British and an Australian voice. By default US English is the standard that is ahead of the other 2.
I'm referring to the fact that if you don't want Siri to have a male voice then you could try using the Australian voice. The British accent is closer to the Australian accent than it is to the American accent and hence Siri (AU) may be able to pick up things better than Siri (US) when speaking to her with a British accent.
 

munch2112

macrumors member
Oct 13, 2011
57
0
Devon, UK
300 million people would beg to differ. It will be inevitable that British English would eventually be assimilate with US English sometime in the future.
The meanings are downright bizarre.
Fag = cigarette..
Calling Mum for a parent sounds like a mumble, I am somewhat biased because I am from the US but I'm sure that most people would prefer the US english way of interaction.
Ummmmm......

It's US ENGLISH, it came from England, first spoken in England, not America. You over the pond are just weird, who puts an 'O' in mum?!
 

Stella

macrumors G3
Apr 21, 2003
8,322
4,778
Canada
Ummmmm......

It's US ENGLISH, it came from England, first spoken in England, not America. You over the pond are just weird, who puts an 'O' in mum?!
I want to make it clear that I'm not having a go at you munch2112.... I'm replying to your post because its the last in this thread.


Talk of what version of English is 'better' or why the other sucks is pretty lame.. and belongs in the school yard. If you have learnt one variant of english and now encounter another variant of the english language there will of course be differences, strange differences. As long as you can commicate ( which you can do quite effectively ) its no big deal.

The English language, whatever variant is constantly evolving.

As soon as the hint of "US english is better" came up, I knew exactly where the conversation was ahead.... down hill. fast.
 
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openendstraight

macrumors regular
May 5, 2010
132
0
La Vegas
LOL! Such an American way of looking at the world...
Please don't lump us all together. I'm from the US, but have traveled the globe, for the most part. I can't stand most Americans because of the attitude they have about being better than everyone else. It gets annoying when we travel and we speak, then people look at us with disgust because we are American. Lately the wife and I have been speaking Cantonese. My wife's family is from Hong Kong, so in the past 6 years I have picked up enough Cantonese to carry on a conversation.

Now we still get looks, but because of me speaking Chinese instead of me being American.

As for the the topic, I don't think I would like the male voice either.