Industrial society destroys Mind and Environment?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by elfin buddy, Jul 30, 2007.

  1. elfin buddy macrumors 6502a

    elfin buddy

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2001
    Location:
    Tuttlingen, Germany
    #1
    I'm not even sure how I stumbled across this, but it definitely caught my attention. I had never even heard of corrupt.org until I saw this, so I'm not quite sure what to think of the place just yet. A lot of the threads in the forums there are pretty philosophically slanted and very abstract.

    In this thread on the corrupt.org forums, the OP (sushil_yadav) goes off on the idea that an industrial society of any sort will be detrimental to both the human Mind and the Earth's Environment. I use capitals for both 'Mind' and 'Environment' because the OP's post on corrupt.org does the same, which I think may be a hint as to the OP's deification of the two.

    The article presents some extremely radical thinking, yet IMO, it doesn't provide a great deal of discussion to back it up: it's written more like a prophecy of doom in flowery prose than a well-researched paper (not that it claims to be a well-researched paper). Nonetheless, a few of its points do make sense to me, so I'm curious what others think of it. I bring it to MacRumors because I have a great respect for the rationality of the community here. I'll reserve posting my opinions on it until a little later, just so that everyone can read through it without being tainted by my own bias. :p
     
  2. Blue Velvet Moderator emeritus

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2004
    #2
    I gave that post you linked to all of 20 seconds... and while it's inarguable that humanity is doing a great job of polluting our planet, I sincerely believe that evolution has equipped us for and will continue to modify our psychology for industrial and post-industrial societies.

    Who knows how humans will further evolve? Mutant variations and incidences of geniuses and savants may give an indication of what things are possible in evolutionary terms.
     
  3. Desertrat macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Location:
    Terlingua, Texas
    #3
    Seems to me that pre-industrial, a relatively small percentage of all people had the free time to sit around and philosophise. Agrarian societies are too tired at the end of the day, and don't really have the free time to "just sit and think". (That many people today don't sit around and think is beside the point. The leisure time, the opportunity is there.)

    Given the vast numbers of folks who actively work at intellectuality, I rather doubt that industrialization has been detrimental to what people CAN do in the way of rational and advanced thinking. It's not dumbos who write software or work with DNA.

    Pollution? The most advanced industrialized countries are the most active at cleaning up behind decades of ignorance. "Best available technology" keeps getting better. Emotions get in the way, of course; we could have avoided a lot of coal-smoke problems since some 55 years ago when the Shippingport power plant went on line.

    A lot of folks' ideas seem to stem from knowing all the history of the last six months...

    'Rat
     
  4. Don't panic macrumors 603

    Don't panic

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Location:
    having a drink at Milliways
    #4
    i would define it more as deranged rather than radical.
    no wonder the guy has issues with logic and science.

    as far as the core of the message, i don't think going back to the stone-age would work for me, so i'll pass.
     
  5. megfilmworks macrumors 68020

    megfilmworks

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2007
    Location:
    Sherman Oaks
    #5
    Great point!! Evolution can be a pain. :)
     
  6. Desertrat macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Location:
    Terlingua, Texas
    #6
    "Evolution can be a pain."

    The US is said to be entering a post-industrial society, becoming an information-age society. This is said to require a better-educated populace. Given the state of education--on average--here, one might wonder if devolution of a society might also be painful.

    'Rat
     

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