iomega External Drive Failure

ekka

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 17, 2012
2
0
Hi there,

I have an iomega external hard drive that I've used on various Macs over the years. A few weeks ago, I plugged it into my iMac and got an error (I don't recall, I was in a hurry, didn't think anything of it, and got what I needed without using it -- I want to say though it bumped it off without me disconnecting it and gave that error about possibly losing files because it wasn't disconnected properly). Anyway, now that I plug it in and try to access the files, nothing registers. It makes a lot of funny noises, flashes the light forever, but eventually quiets down and just sits there with the light on.

Any thoughts? I swear I've had the worst luck ever with external drives. I lose information every few years!

:( :( :( :( :( :( :( :(

:confused:
 

ekka

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jan 17, 2012
2
0
In layman's terms? Sorry...

Someone at work told me maybe I used the wrong version of USB cord. I couldn't find the one that came with it and borrowed a different one from something else.
 

blueroom

macrumors 603
Feb 15, 2009
6,381
25
Toronto, Canada
Unplugging and plugging in storage isn't a good long term solution, so much can go wrong.

A NAS is a Network storage device, Apple Time Machine, Synology & QNAP are excellent.
RAID is a redundant drive array, often two or more drives in an enclosure designed if one drive fails you can pull it out and drop in a new drive and the array will rebuild itself with no data loss.
I use a Synology http://www.synology.com
 

firestarter

macrumors 603
Dec 31, 2002
5,501
119
Green and pleasant land
Five years is about the lifespan of consumer grade HDDs.
Yes

Hard drives are mechanical devices and they wear out. It's not about if but when.

You might want to consider a NAS with RAID.
No

What's needed is a BACKUP.

RAID isn't a backup. Yes, a RAID setup may survive a disk failure, but it won't survive an accidental deletion, OS glitch, power glitch, flood, theft, fire or any number of other problems.

Everyone needs a backup... or preferably two - one in a different location.
 

blueroom

macrumors 603
Feb 15, 2009
6,381
25
Toronto, Canada
Yes

Hard drives are mechanical devices and they wear out. It's not about if but when.


No

What's needed is a BACKUP.

RAID isn't a backup. Yes, a RAID setup may survive a disk failure, but it won't survive an accidental deletion, OS glitch, power glitch, flood, theft, fire or any number of other problems.

Everyone needs a backup... or preferably two - one in a different location.
Agreed RAID isn't a backup. I use DropBox and iCloud for that sort of thing.
 

firestarter

macrumors 603
Dec 31, 2002
5,501
119
Green and pleasant land
Agreed RAID isn't a backup. I use DropBox and iCloud for that sort of thing.
That can't account for much of your data though...

I strongly believe that RAID is a waste of money for most home users. It seems like a nifty technical solution to disk failure - but it brings it's own problems (especially RAID 5 and Drobo), it costs more, and it fails to address a heap of other risks. Most dangerously, it lures people into a false sense of security as they think they no longer need to backup.

Much better to spend that extra money on a couple of drives to do a real backup.
 

blueroom

macrumors 603
Feb 15, 2009
6,381
25
Toronto, Canada
I've got a pair of Synology 110j NAS's, one's here and the other at a friends house. They sync over the internet (feature built into DS 3.x). The 110j also acts as a Time Machine for automatically backup up our Macs.
I did the initial sync locally so it wouldn't take forever and chew through our already limited bandwidth.
I've also got a USB drive locally on my 110j doing Sunday backups.
Another neat trick is Synology has a Time Machine type backup of it's own so it can do Time Machine like backups of its own data.
My browsing, email, notes, calendars and contacts are backed up in iCloud. Handy stuff.
 

harddrivefailur

macrumors newbie
May 24, 2012
13
0
Irvine, CA
That can't account for much of your data though...

I strongly believe that RAID is a waste of money for most home users. It seems like a nifty technical solution to disk failure - but it brings it's own problems (especially RAID 5 and Drobo), it costs more, and it fails to address a heap of other risks. Most dangerously, it lures people into a false sense of security as they think they no longer need to backup.

Much better to spend that extra money on a couple of drives to do a real backup.
I have to agree with this. Unfortunately, a lot of consumer users look at raid solutions as something that will be completely unbreakable. This, as a lot of network administrators can tell you, is a big falsehood.

Probably the safest way for consumers to cost-effectively backup their hard drive is just to buy couple of drives and switch where you are backing up your data on a weekly basis. That way, you always have at least one copy of a backup that is less than one week old.

You can typically scheduling backups to take place at night as well so that you don't even notice them.
 
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