iPhones selling very cheap because they're stuck in recovery mode...

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by 0dev, May 12, 2015.

  1. 0dev macrumors 68040

    0dev

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #1
    I'm seeing a lot of iPhones going for half their real value on eBay just because they're stuck in recovery mode. Is there a likely hardware problem causing this that makes them only good for parts or is it likely to just be a case of putting it in DFU and doing a restore or using Tiny Umbrella to kick it out of being stuck in recovery, etc?

    According to Google it seems this is almost always just a software problem that can be sorted with a simple DFU restore. Would I be correct in this assumption?

    Inquiring profiteers want to know...
     
  2. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #2
    Maybe they are Activation Locked and the sellers are trying to "mask" that by getting them into recovery/DFU mode and selling them that way (less money, but still more than nothing perhaps)?
     
  3. 0dev thread starter macrumors 68040

    0dev

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #3
    This is my concern, they could very well just be iCloud locked and probably stolen.
     
  4. ardchoille50 macrumors 68020

    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2014
    #4
  5. nordique macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2014
    #5
    This is usually the case. Unfortunately, many sellers know this especially on eBay

    OP,
    Not a bad way to get a cheap iPhone however if its not iCloud locked, but its hard to tell sometimes. I know it goes without saying, but always be weary of sellers who are unable to give the IMEI or Serial no. of the iPhones. Sometimes the temptation is there to simply "purchase" the phone before its gone but patience is best.
     
  6. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #6
    Assuming the information is provided, or even if it is provided assuming it's for the phone/device in question and not some other one.
     
  7. 0dev thread starter macrumors 68040

    0dev

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #7
    Thanks for that link. I will request the IMEI before buying anything.

    Digging around eBay you find many ways to buy cheap iPhones for at least £50 less than they're worth, will have to see if this can make me some pocket money :D

    ----------

    If it's fake info then you can easily open a dispute and get a refund anyway.
     
  8. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #8
    Right. But if they are already selling shady phones, seems like they don't much care about it anyway.
     
  9. 0dev thread starter macrumors 68040

    0dev

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #9
    Doesn't really matter, PayPal will grab the money back.
     
  10. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #10
    In that sense it almost doesn't matter then and you can just buy these phones and see what the deal is since the money would be returned anyway if there's anything shady about them.
     
  11. 0dev thread starter macrumors 68040

    0dev

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Location:
    127.0.0.1
    #11
    If I'm given incorrect information then yes.

    However the phones are listed as faulty, so in any other circumstance I can't go "well I can't fix this, give me my money back." That wouldn't work.

    So there is still a risk, I'm only protected if a seller lies about IMEI and it turns out to be iCloud locked. If the phone turns out to have an actual hardware fault which is why it doesn't restore then I have to deal with it.

    It just seems unlikely to me. For example this listing here says it fails when restoring on the computer. This may very well just be a problem with the seller's iTunes installation or something. Or the iPhone could have a mobo fault. No way of knowing until I pay for it. That's why there's potential for profit, because there's also potential for loss (even if I sell the phone on for the same price I paid I would make a loss due to eBay and PP fees).
     
  12. C DM macrumors Westmere

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2011
    #12
    There's that, yes. From what I recall reading in various eBay threads it seems like the buyer can almost always request a refund citing something along the lines of "item not as described" just basically pointing out some small thing here or there (even an inconsequential one) that's different or not mentioned in the description. Haven't really dealt with eBay to that degree, but something I've seen mentioned in one way or another in various threads relating to eBay.
     
  13. Newtons Apple macrumors G5

    Newtons Apple

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2014
    Location:
    Jacksonville, Florida
    #13
    All the eBay seller has to say is that the phone is non-functioning or for parts and he is off the hook.
     

Share This Page