iPod Nano 3G 8Gb Vs. Classic 80gb for use in vehicle?

Discussion in 'iPod' started by tommyhonda92, Feb 2, 2008.

  1. tommyhonda92 macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Edmonton, Ab
    #1
    I just sold my 4gb G1 Nano and am looking at replacing it with either the G3 8gb Nano or the new 80gb Classic....something that can do video. But I am wondering about something. I will be using it almost exclusively in the vehicle, and want an iPod that can do video, but mostly only music videos(that are only 5 minutes max in length) in addition to my relatively small music collection. So if I'm using the iPod almost exclusively in my vehicle, and therefore in all kinds of extreme temperatures and humidities and vibrations, do I have to worry about the hard drive based 80gb Classic being a problem, or is it pretty robust? I have used my 4gb Nano for more than a year now exclusively in my vehicle with zero problems whatsoever in all extreme conditions. I leave my iPod connected to my stereo(Alpine IVA-W200 with Full-Speed iPod cable connection) and stored in the glovebox all the time and never touch at at all unless I update it, so it sits in -35 and +38 temperatures all the time including overnight in the cold when moisture accumulates, but it performs flawlessly every time all the time when I fire my vehicle up. So is the Classic going to be just as reliable in this situation or should I stear very clear of the hard drive based iPod and just go with the new Nano? Or is the Classic maybe going to give me problems, but for the most part should be fine? The whole reason I am looking for a new iPod is I want to be able to use the iPod to play video in my vehicle instead of having a bunch of music video DVD's stored in my vehicle, and would really like the space of the 80gb Classic. If anybody can give me insight as to what others are doing with there iPods that stay in their vehicle exclusively, that would be great. Thanks.
     
  2. NickD macrumors 6502a

    NickD

    Joined:
    Mar 25, 2007
    Location:
    Colorado
    #2
    If you are using it in the car almost 24/7, I would go for the classic. That way you can have a larger selection of music and videos to choose from on the go, and don't have to worry about resyncing select playlists and artists.

    I don't think you should have trouble with a HD based iPod. I know people who have successfully used hard drive iPods in their cars for years and never had problems.
     
  3. tommyhonda92 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Edmonton, Ab
    #3
    Thanks NickD, I figured that it would be alright to use the HD based iPod in my vehicle but I've heard different things from different people. I may just have to play it safe and take the iPod in for night when the temperetures are at there greatest. I'm just wondering if anybody has some first-hand experience with a HD iPod being left in the vehicle 24/7 in all temperature extremes?
     
  4. ataboc macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Nov 27, 2007
    Location:
    Ca
    #4
    It will kill your battery really fast. i wouldn't recommend leaving it in your car at all. It's hot in the summer time.
     
  5. Rapmastac1 macrumors 65816

    Rapmastac1

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2006
    Location:
    In the Depths of the SLC!
    #5
    I've used my 5th gen video in my car all the time. The only problems I ever had was that when it was too cold to use the ipod, like the screen would have a lot of shadowing (refresh rate low when cold) and it wouldn't even work. The best thing you can do about that is just to keep the ipod with you outside of the car on really cold or really hot days and take it out with you, that way it stays at a nice temp.

    If it's on and running when it gets into different temps, it should not turn off... but your battery will definitely take a hit and I would suggest something that either is always connected to your car, or getting an mp3/video player which has a user replaceable battery..
     
  6. tommyhonda92 thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Aug 23, 2005
    Location:
    Edmonton, Ab
    #6
    Well, when I have my iPod connected to my Alpine IVA-W200 with the Full Speed iPod cable, the iPod is charged by the Alpine unit, and the iPod turns on and off with the stereo/ignition. Is way there is no need to take the iPod inside to charge it. Is this what you are worried about with the battery? Or is the temperature extremes what kills the battery in a hurry....and by meaning "kill" are you referring to shortening the long-term life of the battery? Or the short term power to actually power the iPod for hours/minutes at a time?

    I think I've made a decision on the iPod I will be getting. I'm going to go with the 80gb Classic. I just need the room to store video. I'll just have to take it inside for night when the temperatures are at their extremes and be mindfull of this, to preserve the reliability and functionality of the iPod in the vehicle. I know the Nano would be a better choice as far as reliability goes in my situation, but I don't think I can live with only the 8gb of storage. Thanks all for your replies.
     
  7. rockthecasbah macrumors 68020

    rockthecasbah

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2005
    Location:
    Moorestown, NJ
    #7
    Ataboc was most likely referring to the physical weather conditions. Extreme conditions, very hot and very cold, have been known to reduce the life of batteries. Since it will be plugged in that shouldn't matter, but it is at least something to consider. That being said, those weather conditions won't have any less of an effect on a flash based player than a hard drive based one. They both use the same battery types so those conditions will be about the same impact. Flash is considered more durable, but that is for physical movement purposes, not things like weather.

    I think you're making a wise decision regarding the Classic. The Nano's reliability in your case will not really have as big of an impact as it would for say an athlete. In your case, capacity will be the main concern, and the Classic gives you the benefit of far more storage than a Nano. Also, I believe battery life for video playback is better on the Classic than the Nano, but i guess if it's plugged in it won't matter for that either... Still a good decision for the Classic :)
     

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