Is bigger really better for the US?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Cursor, Jun 17, 2009.

  1. Cursor macrumors 6502

    Cursor

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    #1
    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204482304574219813708759806.html

    This is a well-written, provocative article. Personally, I think there are a lot of merits to breaking up the huge bureaucracy we now have. It seems like our modern system of a powerful federal government is unsustainable and totally unconstitutional. We have layers upon layers of laws and regulations that creep in on our personal liberties, drive jobs overseas and choke our capitalistic, free economy.

    Back when this country was envisioned, it was thought that a small, limited government providing mostly for national defense and international trade would be best; with the majority of laws passed at the state and local levels. What has happened? We have drifted a long way from that time.

    The majority of politicians, by nature, are power hungry, and Washington D.C., in-turn, has become a huge, overblown, corrupt dinosaur.
     
  2. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

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    #2
    The WSJ has become rupie's bottom feeder, so I won't read the article.

    It's a shame though that they're focusing on government and not the rise of mega corporations. Are we really best served by hydra like corporations?

    The best governed countries in the world are those with a homogenous society and they're relatively small. Most european countries come to mind. I can't imagine the US splitting apart. It wouldn't be a Velvet Divorce by any stretch of the imagination.

    The rise of the EU is probably the future, not the breakup of the US, Russia or China.

    Anyone who seriously believes that breaking up the US is a viable alternative is simply anti American.
     
  3. Cursor thread starter macrumors 6502

    Cursor

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    #3
    I agree breaking up the US would not be in our best interests, although I don't think it's entirely anti-american.

    The American government has become the largest corporation in the world, and it is failing. Indeed, I think it's too big to save!
     
  4. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    #4
    The majority of humans are power hungry. We have a huge, overblown corrupt dinosaur of a nation. Don't you think our representative democracy should allow us a proportionately-sized influence over our destiny?
     
  5. Cursor thread starter macrumors 6502

    Cursor

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    #5
    Well, stripping the federal governement of some power, and giving those powers to state and county governments would accomplish that.
     
  6. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #6
    What powers do you wish to strip from the federal government? And to what level would you assign them?
     
  7. pseudobrit macrumors 68040

    pseudobrit

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    I suspect it's a simple tautological ideology at work. I'd love to be surprised with a well constructed and concise rebuttal.
     
  8. Shivetya macrumors 65816

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    #8
    Big government, like ours, is more of a threat to personal freedom than big corporations. Why? Because corporations are always under the watching eye of the government but no one can watch the government and act on it.
     
  9. miloblithe macrumors 68020

    miloblithe

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    #9
    You know, except for watchdog groups, the media, other branches of government, voters, international organizations, other country governments...

    But excepting all those who do watch the government and act on it, you're completely right.
     
  10. .Andy macrumors 68030

    .Andy

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    #10
    You don't think you're underestimating the influence that big business has on government?
     
  11. opinioncircle macrumors 6502a

    opinioncircle

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    #11
    I don't think so. To me it's just equal. I think it's all about the system. If government and corporations were founded on healthy bases, it would not be as much as threat as it looks like IMHO.
     
  12. takao macrumors 68040

    takao

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    #12
    obviously because companies never have influences on politics ... especially if they are big ...

    except the VOC ... and the Hanse .. and Krupp ... and IG Farben ... etc.
     
  13. opinioncircle macrumors 6502a

    opinioncircle

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    #13
    I thought Krupp only made coffee ?!!! :D
     
  14. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #14
    I know of no government which, over time, did not increase its power over the citizenry. Back around thirty or forty years, some 4,500 bills were introduced into the Texas legislature for its consideration. Commonly, some 450 to 500 were passed into law. When queried about the rather large numbers, one legislator responded with some to the effect that, "But, but, that's what we're supposed to do! That's why we're here!" I note that a few years back, the number of introduced bills had reached to somewhere around 6,500.

    Every law passed reduces some liberty for somebody. The human race had survived for millenia prior to the passage...

    As to corporations and government, I note that as there have been more and more government regulations on business, the amount of lobbying has increased. First the regulatory effort, then comes the lobbying. Nobody seeks to affect the behavior or actions of government except as there is some perceived need--and it's more commonly in reaction, not in being proactive.

    Small item: Why should it be a federal offense to murder a federal employee? Murder was already against state law, even before JFK was assassinated. The last forty years have seen federalization of many crimes which were already against state laws. That merely duplicates bureaucracies and adds to tax burdens--but it increases federal power.
     
  15. LethalWolfe macrumors G3

    LethalWolfe

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    #15
    I'm hopping this is sarcasm...


    Lethal
     

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