Is it safe to put things on the internet?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by DearthnVader, Dec 5, 2018.

  1. DearthnVader macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #1
    https://talkingpointsmemo.com/dc/report-house-gop-campaign-committees-emails-were-hacked

    So we now know that both the DNC and NRCC have been hacked, trying to put this into the perspective of history vs. Watergate. Now Watergate was unique in that one political party leader pretty much ordered criminal actions, then tried to cover them up.

    These hacks differ some from Watergate, as they are likely the result of foreign powers, trying to see if they can manipulate and/or undermine our Democracy.

    That leaves the question, is it safe to keep this type of data on networked computers?

    Email is very convenient, as is the internet, and computers in general. However these type of cyber intrusions don't require physical access to data, and can be committed by people who never need to enter the country they are hacking.

    Whereas before, if a foreign intelligence service wanted access to this type of campaign data, they world need intel officers to penetrate, work, or coerce, and it still required a human interaction by people within the US.

    One of the very real dangers here is this type of espionage doesn't require them to ever be within the jurisdiction of the nation the laws are being broken in.

    I mean, if we assume Russia or China, they'll just deny ant "official" involvement, and we will likely never be able to bring anyone to justice. Without the threat of law enforcement, how can we hope to deter anyone, or group from interfering in our most important matters.

    It seems to be a quagmire, fought with all sorts of issues I can't even begin to see all the pitfalls of. Are we entering an age that secrecy and privacy will no longer exist as we know them?

    Is that really a bad thing, in the context of democracy, political parties, and committees?

    If you are not doing anything illegal, or unethical, then should you be afraid of the truth?

    The truth can be a fickle, I mean it's easy to paint truthful things into the light you want to paint them in, that's what propaganda is, it's just facts, presented in a way to make you draw the conclusion the person presenting them to you wants you to draw.

    Surely political parties and committees can engage in strategies that are not illegal or unethical, but by their nature wouldn't be effective if not for secrecy?
     
  2. Huntn macrumors demi-god

    Huntn

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    #2
    There is always some level of risk. I keep some important documents online, encrypted with 30 characters, making it relatively secure. It reaches a point where brute force attacks become highly unlikely. The real danger are sites/merchants you have accounts with who get hacked.
     
  3. DearthnVader thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #3
    True, but it's not really a danger to our Democracy.

    Pretty much, if someone has direct access to your computer data, they are going to get in, if they put enough time and money into it, and no data is safe if the computer is connected to a network.

    That leaves us in a sorry state of affairs, because computers that are networked are so useful.
     
  4. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #4
    heard there is a guy named Ralph wrecking things out there on the internet.......anything online is at risk of being hacked.
     
  5. DearthnVader thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #5
    So is it wise to put secrets online, personal, business, or State?

    I mean it depends on the level of security, and the level of the motivation of the hacker. When there is billions or trillions of dollars at stake, or the geo-political and/or military security of the world at stake, I think we can see, there is no level of security that can't be hacked.

    Tho, things really haven't changed all that much, spies have always been able to turn people, or use them to get access to paper data locked in a government office building. It's just with networked computers, we've made that game a lot easier, and they never have to enter or leave the country, so it's unlikely anyone will ever be held to account.
     
  6. jkcerda macrumors 6502a

    jkcerda

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    #6
    HOW are you going to move things and access it? send USB drives via mail?
     
  7. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #7
    If we follow Betteridge's Law of Headlines, the answer is no. And, I tend to think that the flippant, easy answer is no. There are too many flaws in servers and too much to gain by hacking them to leave this data available.

    That said, unless places like the NRCC are willing to "air gap" their private and public systems, and operate an internal and external network, they're probably going to get hacked.

    And, not many organizations can build out a SCIF.

    For journalists, this remains a major worry. We deal with special data all the time, and no one is quite sure how to make sure that our communications and work product remains safe against hackers working for private entities or governments. Even using encrypted communications comes with its own risks, and there are big questions about how the security of iMessage, Signal, etc.
    --- Post Merged, Dec 5, 2018 ---
    Right. If you have someone willing to schlep on secrets on music CDs, you're in trouble, but remote attacks are less risky and more rewarding.
     
  8. DearthnVader thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #8
    We have systems of protection for our personal economic data, but they are only as good as our insurance and law enforcement.

    That's the point I'm driving at here, State data and political secretes need to be handled in a better way, because it's hard to insure the peace and security of the free world, and these bad actors are beyond the scope of our current law enforcement.
     
  9. Huntn macrumors demi-god

    Huntn

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    #9
    I’m using 15-30 character passwords. I highly recommend 1Password for managing these long password without losing your mind. :)

     
  10. zin macrumors 6502

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    #10
    Weird how the Republicans notify and cooperate with the FBI immediately, yet the DNC brought in a private security contractor and rebuffed the FBI multiple times.
     
  11. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #11
    That's a handy link! I use 1Password too... the weakest thing about it is that it uses face id to open it! .... Yeah I know turning it off is possible... but my 1Password password is loooonnnnggggg.

    For my regular passwords I think I'll do ok... from the linked site :
    7897: MILLENNIA
    2: DECADES
    4: YEARS
    9: MONTHS
    3: WEEKS
    3: DAYS
    21: HOURS
    52: MINUTES
    32: SECONDS
    11: JIFFIES
    3: MILLISECONDS
     
  12. DearthnVader thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #12
    What will those times be for a given password in ten years?

    Will we update our passwords and security as we go, or will older, more forgotten systems fall though the cracks?
     
  13. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #13
    The FBI is like any law enforcement operation. Without an invitation they would need a warrant, and to get a warrant they would need probable cause. Also perhaps the absolute damage the DNC email debacle caused may have given taught the GOP to react quickly.
    --- Post Merged, Dec 5, 2018 ---
    If this estimate is correct each year in advancement shaves off 460 years or so.... but good point they should factor that into their calculation (if they don't).
     
  14. Huntn macrumors demi-god

    Huntn

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    #14
    Although worried at times about Face ID, I use it, it’s just too convienent. :)
     
  15. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #15
    Which is another important note in password security. Your password is only as strong as the weakest link.
     
  16. DearthnVader thread starter macrumors 6502a

    DearthnVader

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    #16
    I think that's true in any secrete, if two people know about it, that's one too many. Tho it's hard to run a government that way.
     
  17. rdrr macrumors 6502a

    rdrr

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    #17
    It depends on who you are and what you are putting on the internet. For most users like you or I, maintaining a general knowledge of phishing and social hacking techniques, using password managers with complex passwords, and 2 factor authentication are enough. For corporations and government, it depends on the data you are storing and moving around on the internet.
     

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16 December 5, 2018