Is it safe to use a higher watt charger on the new iPad?


Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
Yes, but the iPad may not use the extra power and limit its intake to 2A which is 10 watts at 5V.
 

w00t951

macrumors 68000
Jan 6, 2009
1,831
4
Pittsburgh, PA
The charging is regulated from the device. Apple could make it charge faster, but that would produce exponentially more heat. I bet this is the perfect balance Apple could find.
 

Yr Blues

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Jan 14, 2008
2,176
188
The charging is regulated from the device. Apple could make it charge faster, but that would produce exponentially more heat. I bet this is the perfect balance Apple could find.
If that's the case, I can deal with it. As long as they try their best. They have to play by the laws of economics and physics.
 

gr8tfly

macrumors 603
Oct 29, 2006
5,298
48
~119W 34N
Just a note about LiPo batteries in general:

Even if the device would allow charging at higher rates, it could be at best, damaging to the cells; at worse, result in swelling, bursting, or possible fire. It would depend on how much over the amount and rate allowed for the cell being charged.

I would highly recommend leaving it to Apple's engineers to have worked out the best charge curves balanced with internal heat dissipation - all while keeping the rate well below the maximum set for each cell.
 

Yr Blues

macrumors 68020
Original poster
Jan 14, 2008
2,176
188
Just a note about LiPo batteries in general:

Even if the device would allow charging at higher rates, it could be at best, damaging to the cells; at worse, result in swelling, bursting, or possible fire. It would depend on how much over the amount and rate allowed for the cell being charged.

I would highly recommend leaving it to Apple's engineers to have worked out the best charge curves balanced with internal heat dissipation - all while keeping the rate well below the maximum set for each cell.
Makes sense. I won't risk it.
 

Archer1440

Suspended
Mar 10, 2012
731
289
USA
The RC crowd knows how this is done, but the fact is Apple has to balance battery longevity with charge rate and thermal management in a sealed case. RC LiPo powered models and Mac Airs don't have this issue.

Faster charges = more heat = shorter lifespan.

/Scotty voice ON: "Ye canna change the laws of PHYSICS capt'n" /Scotty voice OFF
 

UrsaMajor

macrumors regular
Jan 4, 2007
130
0
Oem charger is best. The device has a voltage regulator to cut off any amount of draw above the "safe" amount.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
Makes sense. I won't risk it.
You can use a 10 amp charger, pending you don't short out the iPad's circuitry, it'll still only charge at 2 amps. There is nothing wrong with using higher amp chargers with iPads, iPhones, or iPods.

The RC crowd knows how this is done, but the fact is Apple has to balance battery longevity with charge rate and thermal management in a sealed case. RC LiPo powered models and Mac Airs don't have this issue.

Faster charges = more heat = shorter lifespan.

/Scotty voice ON: "Ye canna change the laws of PHYSICS capt'n" /Scotty voice OFF
iOS devices only fast charge to 80%, they then slow charge to 95% and trickle charge to 100%.

Oem charger is best. The device has a voltage regulator to cut off any amount of draw above the "safe" amount.
The OEM charger doesn't have such circuity. The regulator is within the iPad.
 

gr8tfly

macrumors 603
Oct 29, 2006
5,298
48
~119W 34N
The RC crowd knows how this is done, but the fact is Apple has to balance battery longevity with charge rate and thermal management in a sealed case.

Faster charges = more heat = shorter lifespan.

/Scotty voice ON: "Ye canna change the laws of PHYSICS capt'n" /Scotty voice OFF
Aside from my engineering experience, I also learned a lot when building model aircraft - using LiPo for engine power being the most challenging. You're always tempted to push it a bit to get that one last flight in (most resisted the temptation - especially after seeing the remnants of someone's failed charge attempt, at the next club meeting ;) )
 

TB07-NJ

macrumors 68020
Jul 7, 2008
2,306
130
FORMERLY NJ now FL
Oem charger is best. The device has a voltage regulator to cut off any amount of draw above the "safe" amount.
Wrong. It's a standard USB charger. Internal circuitry in the iPad controls the charging rate. Sure, it may have a fuse but that's no different from any other USB charger.

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using LiPo for engine power being the most challenging. You're always tempted to push it a bit to get that one last flight in (most resisted the temptation - especially after seeing the remnants of someone's failed charge attempt, at the next club meeting ;) )
Except in Heli's & park flyers the battery usually has room to eeexxxpppaannddd.
 

Intell

macrumors P6
Jan 24, 2010
18,872
368
Inside
OK, you win. IT'S NOT A STANDARD USB CHARGER. Does that make you feel better? :rolleyes:
Not really. Internet arguments are such fruitless trivial things. But what will make me feel better is a plate of cookies magically appearing on the table next to me.
 

master-ceo

macrumors 65816
Sep 7, 2007
1,494
3
The SUN
Just a note about LiPo batteries in general:

Even if the device would allow charging at higher rates, it could be at best, damaging to the cells; at worse, result in swelling, bursting, or possible fire.
Yep, A rapid charge generates major heat. Those batteries won't last too long.
 

BHP41

macrumors 6502a
Jul 21, 2010
831
1
United States of America
I really can't see why this is a issue. If you use your iPad all day, the you either don't work or are out of school and have nothing better to do. Either way you have access to a charger.

If you use your iPad all day for work then it will last....all day. At night while you sleep plug it in and start the process over again. Can't fathom why anyone would need this thing to charge faster than it does. I put mine on charge at 30% at 1700, came back to it at 2000 and it was at 80%.
 

gnasher729

macrumors P6
Nov 25, 2005
16,527
3,122
Just curious. A third party solution might be in order.
An iPad takes up to 2 Ampere / 10 Watt from the charger. If you have a 20 Ampere / 100 Watt charger, the iPad will still only take 2 Ampere / 10 Watt. So the iPad won't get damaged, and it won't charge any faster.