Is it true OS X El Capitan (10.11) and Sierra the system is locked down?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by Bubble99, Nov 3, 2016.

  1. Bubble99 macrumors 6502

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2015
    #1
    Is it true OS X El Capitan (10.11) and Sierra the system is locked down?

    With OS X Yosemite (10.10) and OS before Yosemite like Mavericks, Mountain Lion so on allowed you to makes systems tweaks or install themes so on.

    Is it true starting with OS X El Capitan and now Sierra the system is locked down and those old days are over?
     
  2. KALLT macrumors 601

    Joined:
    Sep 23, 2008
    #2
    No, the days are not over. The OS X kernel protects system directories and Apple applications at runtime. You can disable this protection in Recovery with a simple command.
     
  3. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

    Staff Member

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    Location:
    California
    #3
    A little, but you can work around it.

    Starting with El Capitan, some system files and apps are protected with what is called "System Integrity Protection" (SIP). This link explains it.

    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204899

    You can follow this to disable SIP and have the same access you did pre-El Capitan.

    Screen Shot 2016-11-04 at 11.23.55 AM.png
     
  4. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #4
    How do you get into recovery mode when the new computers don't have CD/DVD drive and don't come with recovery disk?
    --- Post Merged, Nov 5, 2016 ---
    You still need a recovery disk to get into recovery mode. And the new computers don't have CD/DVD drive.
     
  5. MacUser2525 macrumors 68000

    MacUser2525

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    Mar 17, 2007
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    Canada
    #5
    Command + R held down at boot the OS put hidden recovery partition on the disk at install time, disk dies and you replace it the Option + Command + R for the internet recovery if the machine is new enough to support it. Otherwise you make install USB/DVD and hope the signing keys on it have not expired by the time you need it.
     
  6. Weaselboy Moderator

    Weaselboy

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    #6
    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201314

    From the hidden recovery partition like MacUser2525 mentioned. More info at this link.
     
  7. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    Mar 15, 2015
    #7
    Sounds kinda of silly putting a recovery mode on the disk than firmware chip. If the hard-drive or SSD dies there is no way to boot to recovery mode to find out what is wrong. You would not know the hard-drive or SSD died and needs to be replaced.

    Also putting OS on the hard-drive or SSD means when the hard-drive or SSD dies you need new OS.

    No way to bring OS disk and load it on new hard-drive or SSD.
     
  8. CoastalOR macrumors 68000

    CoastalOR

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    Jan 19, 2015
    Location:
    Oregon, USA
    #8
    I like having a bootable USB flash drive installer in the drawer, just in case there is a failure like you described.
    https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201372
    http://arstechnica.com/apple/2015/0...able-os-x-10-11-el-capitan-usb-install-drive/
     
  9. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

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    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #9
    Macs have not shipped with separate installer disks since late 2011. Since that time, it has all been through software downloads.
    And yes, your Mac can connect to Apple's servers, and do a system install, even if your hard drive or SSD is completely blank.
    So all recovery can be done from the hidden partition in the hard drive, or if that is erased/replaced, you can boot to Internet Recovery.
    You can try that out by restarting, while holding Option-Command-R. You will see a different boot icon (a spinning globe) indicating that you using a network boot, using your internet connection.
    The main disadvantage to internet recovery is that you will only have the choice to reinstall with the OS X system that your Mac shipped with originally, and not the one that you might have updated to. But, you can at least set up a booting system, or you can check for the serviceability of the hard drive, and do a few other things as well.
     
  10. Bubble99 thread starter macrumors 6502

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    #10
  11. DeltaMac macrumors 604

    DeltaMac

    Joined:
    Jul 30, 2003
    Location:
    Delaware
    #11
    Ah, that's an inaccurate statement.
    The USB ports are not "killed". The USB ports are physically different USB-C ports.
    You do need USB-C to USB-A adapters, or devices that connect natively to that USB-C port.
    Flash drives that are native USB-C are fairly easy to find, for example at Amazon.com.
    Hard drives, and other devices with that connection are getting more common, too.
     
  12. pastrychef, Nov 7, 2016
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2016

    pastrychef macrumors 601

    pastrychef

    Joined:
    Sep 15, 2006
    Location:
    New York City, NY
    #12
    Wherever you are getting this information that (1) El Capitan and Sierra are locked down and that (2) Apple killed the USB port... Stop reading or listening their nonsense. It just sounds like lots of fear mongering from haters (or at least extremely misinformed) with one sensationalized story after another.
     

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