Is made in America important to you?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by 63dot, Dec 7, 2008.

  1. 63dot macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #1
    Does it have to be made in the USA, or NAFTA partners Canada and Mexico? And can buying from here, or nearby help in the long run vs. having it made overseas? Will making it here pollute less and be able to control environmentally under NAFTA regulations? I put this post in this section and not the political forums because I don't want to make it a way to bash political leaders from any countries. I hope the mods agree. :)

    I know it's no magic bullet, but from now on, if possible and affordable within reason on my budget, I am going to try and buy here, and Canadian and Mexican products.

    There are certain things that I can't find from here like many computer high tech products, sneakers, and underwear among other items. But my Levi's are from Mexico and Fender guitars I have owned were built mostly there and in the USA. I am glad that Apple Inc. decided to put one of their customer service centers in Canada, when they could have gone overseas and saved much more money.

    One day I may upgrade my computer speakers and my guitar amplifier, and there are Canadian, Mexican, and American alternatives to buying from overseas. There is no doubt that an overseas product may offer more value for the dollar and have more features for the dollar, but this is a sacrifice I am willing to make.
     
  2. dukebound85 macrumors P6

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  3. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #3
    I did too, at one time thus the reason I bought a Chinese made guitar for $370 instead of similar quality guitar from Mexico for $600 dollars or a Canadian one for $700 dollars. The US counterpart was $1200 so it was not in the loop.

    But I wasn't thinking about how this could impact the recession economy we are in. I should have bought USA or from NAFTA partners Canada and Mexico.
     
  4. yg17 macrumors G5

    yg17

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    #4
    Not at all. I care about quality. If it comes from America, Canada, Japan, Germany, China, Timbuktu or the Moon, I really don't care.
     
  5. erickkoch macrumors 6502a

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    #5
    If quality and price are comparable I'll veer towards the MADE IN AMERICA product, otherwise, no.
     
  6. neiltc13 macrumors 68040

    neiltc13

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    #6
    I steer well clear of products with "made in the USA" on them because they are likely extremely expensive (paying for brand names) or won't work properly.

    This is especially the case with cars. That said, there aren't too many products on sale here which are actually made in the USA and the imports we do get tend to be of extremely poor quality (Subway, McDonalds and Burger King, I'm looking at you).

    If I was buying to "support" an economy, then buying an American product would probably be near the very bottom of my list which is headed by Germany and the United Kingdom.
     
  7. drichards macrumors 6502a

    drichards

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    #7
    As long as the bottom says DESIGNED BY APPLE IN CALIFORNIA you're good to go.
     
  8. synth3tik macrumors 68040

    synth3tik

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    #8
    As long as it is not an automobile I won't stray away from it.
     
  9. GoCubsGo macrumors Nehalem

    GoCubsGo

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    #9
    Designed and made are two different things.

    I say generally speaking I would prefer it, but not at the risk of sacrificing quality. Generally speaking, especially today, I think it is important to support local establishments as well as American-Made merchandise (if you're in the US). Honestly, our economy could certainly use a boost, but if they output trash then there's not much any of us can do. I men, wasting your hard earned dollars on trash just to support the country's economy doesn't sound very economical. I'm sure some will disagree, but that is my opinion.
     
  10. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #10
    I think it's almost impossible to really "buy American" at this point, so it's hardly worth worrying about. I try to buy things from local businesses and local producers, but obviously, even if I buy camping gear from the local outdoors outfitters, the actual gear comes from points all over the world. Even a local beer brewery, which seems like a simple thing, has equipment from France and buys their hops from Germany. And, right now, I'm drinking coffee made by a machine from Italy, the cup is from China (or California, I can't read the tiny label), and the printed label is from Vermont.
     
  11. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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  12. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #12
    Actually, I thought about putting this in the post, too. Buying locally, especially for recession ridden rural areas, is key to keeping such areas from becoming ghost towns. I live in one of the oldest cities in my state which was once a booming city. However, much of the commerce either moved to the north or south, or even out of state and those other areas got heavily developed.

    I don't care if I spend a few dollars more for local store products vs. just getting something over the internet drop shipped from China or India. Even buying a product from China or India, but from a local store in your area does help that store, the employer and employees who are working because the store is there, and the town that the store is in since the business pays taxes to the city and that state.

    I used to think that buying locally was a tactic that the small local businesses did to stay in business for only their purposes. But helping a local store helps you, too and the local community it serves.
     
  13. iVeBeenDrinkin' macrumors 65816

    iVeBeenDrinkin'

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    #13
    Yes, I stopped drinking Bud Lite and only drink Miller Lite now for that very reason.
     
  14. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

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    #14
    Agree.

    Most products have subcomponents made around the world, so it is really hard to purchase something completely made in the USA.

    In my case, I prefer to purchase quality goods and then use them for years. You may pay more in initial costs, but overall cost is less.
     
  15. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #15
    Saw this come up on Neatorama back on the 1st.

    Link


     
  16. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

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    #16
    It's definitely worth buying the better product.

    I've bought cheap clothing in market-stalls and those items barely lasted a month much less a year, while other items that seemed pricey are nearly indestructible.

    That's been true with coats, boots, backpacks, and other items.

    What's really fun is to find the weird exceptions, where the el-cheap-o item outlasts and outperforms the pricey items, but these are rare.

    I think a mixture of near and far is a good way to operate. I buy local beer, local food, and local clothing, art, and other things, but I also buy camera gear from Japan and computers from Apple, which means California designs made in Chinese factories. If I can, I avoid chains. If not, I go to chains that seem to have the motto "don't be evil."


    EDIT: It just occurred to me, the only industry that one might be able to actually buy American might be books. While there are imprints from England and other countries, many books are published in the United States. So, if you want to buy American, heading towards your local bookstore might not be so bad.
     
  17. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #17
    I know in a complex item, such as my beloved Fender Stratocaster, which was the topic of a major grad school paper I did, and floated around as my master's thesis possibility, is made from wood from Canada, the Philippines, and India.

    Sometimes part of the wood supply is grown in the US from certain years but that is increasingly rare. That wood is shaped into a body in Ensenada, Mexico from a state of the art shaper/router that uses computers and robotics (from Japan, China, and Taiwan) and shipped to the US in California or further built in Mexico at their own factory. Some bodies are shaped in the US but anymore, increasingly, the US is more of the final setup and quality control center, or using American experts at Fender's foreign factories to keep things remarkably consistent, like Starbucks or McDonalds.

    The components for the elctrical and electronic parts are often from Taiwan, and this goes for much of Fender's electronics that go into their world famous amps.

    A long used bridge on the Stratocaster's double locking models came from Germany, but from an American design. Many non locking trem Strats used ESP parts from Japan over the years. The tuners come from Schaller in Germany, Grover in the USA, and Gotoh in Japan and South Korea.

    Strap buttons for many years came from Schaller in Germany.

    The paint was once from the big auto makers on opaque colors but that could be different today. Certain high end finishes come from banned toxic finishes used and made in a country well known for still using, well, toxic paints. :)

    The Fender Stratocaster, the American icon, is made in the USA, Mexico, or China, among others, and is not purely a product of any one country from that list. It's a team project from the screws, to the copper windings for the pickups, to the finishes, to the routers that shape their bodies. My own skateboard and skate clothing business had automated tools I plan to purchase, and they are all from China from what I have seen.

    Twenty or thirty years ago, I don't think this was the case with those skate clothing silk screen presses I am eyeing over with great lust. :)
     
  18. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #18
    For those of you old enough to remember,

    what about the American garment industry?

    Much of the work done in New York in the garment district were from Chinese workers. The main difference today is that the Chinese workers are from China doing work over there.

    There is still that issue of having clothes made so far away and shipped here. How much of a carbon footprint is made from all the stuff made in Europe and Asia and shipped here?

    I think one way, though a small way perhaps, to reduce carbon emissions is to keep as much as possible ultra local in small economies. Gaps in goods can be filled by internet shopping. Maybe we can combine the old with the new since the global warming thing will be the fight for our lives.

    The other day, I got the rest of my "smart" lightbulbs that have been sitting around and put them in the lamps that I don't even use that much. Even so, what little I do use them for, it's nice to know that they have a smaller carbon footprint.
     
  19. cycocelica macrumors 68000

    cycocelica

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    #19
    What he said. Although I do get a warm feeling when I do buy something that's made in America.
     
  20. it5five macrumors 65816

    it5five

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    #20
    I don't necessarily buy only American/North American, but I do my best to buy non-sweatshop.

    Almost all of my clothes are American Apparel (entirely made in LA), I'm pretty sure New Balance shoes are made in the US or UK (for the European market). I don't buy any processed foods, so I don't have to worry that much about my food being from outside of NA.
     
  21. Desertrat macrumors newbie

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    #21
    I shop by comparison of quality and price, and even there the actual need comes into the equation. For instance, many of my hand tools are Snap-On; they're the absolute best--with some wrenches in the $15 to $25 range. Lesser use, I have some of those el-cheapo wrenches which come in sets from SAM's, for $20 for a set.

    I've no complaints with the US-made vehicles I've owned, particularly my full-sized 2000 GMC pickup. I've added 110,000 miles to the original user's 50,000, with only some brake work. But, for rough roads in the back country, nothing beats the small Toyota 4WD pickup.

    Still, "Buy American" won't do much for the overall economy. The only way any nation can be healthy is to produce items for export at a competitive price, and keep the balance of payments even or positive. We quit trying to do that some thirty or forty years ago.

    'Rat
     
  22. BigHungry04 macrumors 6502

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    #22
    SABMiller, the company that owns the MillerCoors brand is based in South Africa. So um... yeah, you're supporting an American company.

    Wait for it.....


    Not!
     
  23. JW8725 macrumors 6502a

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  24. abijnk macrumors 68040

    abijnk

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    #24
    Bud might be owned by a company outside of America, but it is very much Made in America...
     
  25. 63dot thread starter macrumors 603

    63dot

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    #25
    If Anchor or Sierra Nevada sells out, then I am moving! :)
     

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