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hajime

macrumors 604
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
7,856
1,290
Does the slow speed also affect other devices such as USB-C to Ethernet adapter?
 

hajime

macrumors 604
Original poster
Jul 23, 2007
7,856
1,290
Your numbers are about the range I have been seeing. An enclosure manufacturer just told me that such lower than expected speed is due to a "bug" in the M1 chip. I think I read something about such limitation on the M1 Mac and M1 iPad in other threads.

For ethernet connection, is 10Gbps achievable?
 

cupcakes2000

macrumors 68040
Apr 13, 2010
3,904
5,354
the question makes no sense. We would have to purchase the mac, find out it was a bit slower than we thought (even though it isn’t) wait until we wanted to upgrade, and then buy a larger ssd in the hope to shave a few seconds? Talk about the long game.
Apple would need to be totally dedicated in their attempt to really swindle their customers. I know that’s a popular thought around here but I highly doubt this is what’s happening here.
 
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Adult80HD

macrumors 6502a
Nov 19, 2019
692
822
Your numbers are about the range I have been seeing. An enclosure manufacturer just told me that such lower than expected speed is due to a "bug" in the M1 chip. I think I read something about such limitation on the M1 Mac and M1 iPad in other threads.

For ethernet connection, is 10Gbps achievable?
These are close to the theoretical maximum one can get with a TB3/4 connection. It's not going to get better than that. Why do you think this is "much lower than expected?"

If you get a junk enclosure with a cheap controller chip, expect junk speed. In addition, some of the enclosure manufacturers and NVMe manufacturers have issues with their firmware and that's not an Apple problem. Finally, you can't get the USB 3.2 2x2 20GB/s devices--Apple has never supported those. If you want fast, get Thunderbolt certified.
 
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lcubed

macrumors 6502a
Nov 19, 2020
540
325
Does the slow speed also affect other devices such as USB-C to Ethernet adapter?
the ethernet speed issue appears to be related to which RealTek chip is used in the adapter.
the older version of the chip is slower when used with the M1 macs.
this was brought up in another thread you were involved in.
 
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Gnattu

macrumors 65816
Sep 18, 2020
1,027
1,402
Your numbers are about the range I have been seeing. An enclosure manufacturer just told me that such lower than expected speed is due to a "bug" in the M1 chip. I think I read something about such limitation on the M1 Mac and M1 iPad in other threads.

For ethernet connection, is 10Gbps achievable?
Everything suffers are usb based devices, not Thunderbolt based devices.

10Gbps is solid and stable on my M1 and M1 Max.
 

bobcomer

macrumors 601
May 18, 2015
4,949
3,695
No because they are not slow. Get a proper TB or USB4 enclosure and they are extremely fast. I get 3100MB/s Read and 2900MB/s write on my Mac Studios and MacBook Pro w/ with the M1 Max.
I get about twice that speed with the internal drive... (1TB drive)
 

Lihp8270

macrumors 65816
Dec 31, 2016
1,126
1,593
I get about twice that speed with the internal drive... (1TB drive)
It’s an internal drive……. They’re always faster.

And you’re comparing it to apples internal drive which is one of the fastest available, even compared to what is on PC
 
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leman

macrumors Core
Oct 14, 2008
19,360
19,432
Another thing to consider is that Apple’s IO implementation is security-first, with much stricter device isolation than many others, and it might have an impact on performance. And of course, it’s their first-gen implementation, it still might lack maturity. But no, they are not throttling the performance on purpose. That would be stupid.

P.S. I am not trying to defend Apple or justify their IO performance deficits, just wanted to point out some things that might be relevant.
 
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brosenz

macrumors 6502
Apr 26, 2011
342
90
I have 2 MacBook Pro's, Intel and M1, I have a TB3 SSD (Samsung X5), I get the same speed on both laptops, the SSD runs as fast as the TB3 connection allows it to run.
 

joevt

Contributor
Jun 21, 2012
6,837
4,133
The maximal theoretical bandwidth of TB4 is around 4000MB/s, probably lower in practice.
Right.
40 Gbps * 1 Byte / 8 bits = 5GB/s. But a single Thunderbolt device is limited to PCIe 3.0 x4 = 4 * 8 GT/s * 128 bits / 130 Transfers = 31.5 Gbps. * 1 Byte / 8 bits = 3938 MB/s
An NVMe connected to a real PCIe 3.0 x4 slot can do around 3500 MB/s.
An NVMe in a Thunderbolt enclosure is limited to ≈ 3000 MB/s.
 
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Ethosik

Contributor
Oct 21, 2009
7,907
6,846
I heard some rumors that Apple has been working on this M1 design for the last 5 years (which lines up when Apple got frustrated with Intel). I wouldn't be surprised if there is a bottleneck/old design somewhere. But I think people need to cool it down a bit thinking every little thing is malicious by Apple to get more money. There could be a fixable bug, it could be M1 architectural flaw, or its just the limits of the ports as others have stated.

Also, external while about 90% efficient will not 100% match an internal connection.
 
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