Johann Cruyff, Dutch Football Legend, dies of cancer, aged 68

Discussion in 'Current Events' started by Scepticalscribe, Mar 24, 2016.

  1. Scepticalscribe, Mar 24, 2016
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2016

    Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #1
    Just spotted this on the BBC.

    There are not many in the football world whose name automatically conjures up the word 'legend', but Johan Cruyff, whose death from cancer (the guy was a chain smoker in his younger days) at the age of 68 has just been reported, can rightly be said to have been one of the few, genuinely footballing greats.

    Those who remember how he graced the football field will recall him as an outstanding player with Ajax, - he led them to three consecutive European Cups between 1971 and 1973 - and later with the legendary (that word again) Dutch football team which reached the final of the World Cup in 1974, playing 'total football' but losing (some thought unfairly) 2-1 to what was then West Germany.

    But there are many very good, even exceptionally good, players. Johan Cruyff went much further than that, for, both as a footballer - and later, as a superb player and later still outstanding coach with Barcelona, (he led them to a European Cup win, too, in 1992) he embodied and practiced the philosophy of his mentor, Rinus Michals, - a philosophy that became known as 'Total Football', a philosophy that encouraged the emergence of a thinking player, equally comfortable with all positions and all roles on the pitch.

    This was a philosophy that Cryuff embodied on the pitch, and later, as a coach, with great success in the dressing room. He also believed in stuff such as youth academies, allowing players to take responsibility on the pitch, one to one individually tailored training, and intelligence and idealism on the field and off.

    Cryuff was a thoughtful, intelligent and idealistic man, articulate in interviews, inspirational as a coach, unforgettable as a player. Ethics informed his philosophy, too, and he believed - passionately - in giving something back.

    And he was subtle, and respectful of other cultures, and well knew the power of knowing the right thing to do in a given place and time: For example, while managing Barcelona, he gave his new born son the name of Jordi, the patron saint of Catalonia, a gesture received with passionate fervour and boundless gratitude by the citizens of Barcelona and Catalonia.

    A class act as a human being, citizen, coach and a true legend in football. RIP Mr Cruyff.
     
  2. m4v3r1ck macrumors 68020

    m4v3r1ck

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  3. JGRE macrumors 6502a

    JGRE

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  4. JamesMike macrumors demi-god

    JamesMike

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    #4
    I always like Cryuff's statement: “I don’t go through life cursing the fact that I didn’t win a World Cup. I played in a fantastic team that gave millions of people watching a great time. That’s what football is all about."
     
  5. Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #5
    Not only that: That team he played in redefined the ideal of how football - at its best - can be judged and played.

    They set the standard for what is viewed as 'perfect football' in the modern era, and they were seen as an embodiment of a kind of philosophical interpretation of footballing brilliance that few other teams in history (perhaps, Brazil in 1970, perhaps, Hungary in 1954….) ever came close to matching.

    A World Cup medal virtually pales in comparison to being the yardstick, or measure, of perfection in what your field of endeavour is all about.
    --- Post Merged, Mar 24, 2016 ---
    As a wonderful quote I came across earlier today so eloquently expressed it: He (Johan Cruyff) was "Pythagoras in boots".
     
  6. Limey77 macrumors regular

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    #6
    He was a true legend and will be missed.

    I had no idea he was sick and my first thought was "wow, how terrible". But it did cause me to think, why should I or anyone else have known??

    I know now that it was announced and I just missed it. But I found it somewhat strange that my first thought was why I didn't know he was sick.
     
  7. Scepticalscribe, Apr 4, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2016

    Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #7
    Some people are private, and value privacy and personal space, even in the age of FB and Twitter and constant updates announcing personal status.

    Re Johan Cruyff, he had smoked with an addict's lascivious craving and greedy need for decades.

    Indeed, he had also smoked with that wonderfully unconcerned, almost dissolute disdain for the kind of concerns of the health police that became the norm in professional sports in the years and decades since he shone with such flawless grace on the football field…

    For that matter, he might have legitimately asked, flicking his cigarette ash at them with supercilious contempt, why people took such umbrage at nicotine when (these days, as many are sadly aware) far worse was swimming around in the arteries and veins of top footballers.

    Thus, his cancer was no real surprise, and neither was his desire to keep such matters away from the full glare of publicity.
     
  8. Limey77 macrumors regular

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    #8
    Yeah I know, and he even announced how I'll be was a year ago, I just missed it.

    But I did find it interesting on a personal level that my first thought was that I should know.

    Why should I know? what right do I have to know about his medical condition? The answer is, I have no right. Yet I still felt I should.

    I just thought it was a fascinating insight into the modern world. That I, someone who didn't know him, felt I had the right to know he was dying.

    It was the first time since had had that feeling, and with hindsight, made me feel like a dick.
     
  9. Scepticalscribe thread starter Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #9
    No, you had no right to know. People have the right to set their own boundaries, even those who have lived some of their lives in the public space.

    To my mind, an individual's private space is only of interest (publicly) if what goes on there is at striking variance with, or in stark contradiction to, what is said by that same individual in the public space, and the individual in question is in a position to influence the formation of public policy in such matters.

    Otherwise, to my way of thinking, the private space - and sphere - (yes, notwithstanding FB and Twitter) is just that, - in other words, it is private.
     
  10. Limey77 macrumors regular

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    #10
    Oh I completely agree.

    That's why I felt so ****** about it.

    I mean Gazza or Maradonna dying would NOT be a surprise. But with Cruyff, I was surprised and disappointed in my own internal response.
     

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