John Hinkley to be released from prison today

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by thermodynamic, Sep 10, 2016.

  1. thermodynamic Suspended

    thermodynamic

    Joined:
    May 3, 2009
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    USA
    #1
    http://www.latimes.com/nation/nationnow/la-na-john-hinckley-jr-release-20160910-snap-htmlstory.html
    --- Post Merged, Sep 10, 2016 ---
    More here:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/loca...ad0e9e-75ca-11e6-be4f-3f42f2e5a49e_story.html
    --- Post Merged, Sep 10, 2016 ---
    It's sad, we have millions of people who want to contribute positively to society and will never live in a posh gated community, much less get offered a job regardless of experience or handicap. That thug commits a truly heinous act and is getting quite a bit in return, jail time notwithstanding.
     
  2. appleisking macrumors 6502a

    Joined:
    May 24, 2013
    #2
    He's not a thug, he's mentally ill and was locked up in a psychiatric hospital for 35 years after being found not guilty by way of insanity. He is literally being offered nothing, merely given his freedom after being deemed not dangerous to the public. Or is it his fault, his mother lives in a nice neighborhood?
     
  3. LumbermanSVO macrumors 65816

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    Mar 15, 2007
    Location:
    Denton, TX
    #3
    I've been to his mother's neighborhood three years in a row when the LPGA shows up there. Most of the homeowners I've talked to aren't bothered by the idea of John living there, though I've heard he isn't allowed to stay there for the tournament. It is nice place to live though, it's a wooded area with a beautiful golf course. A homeowner told em that the annual HOA fee is $35k and adding a golf club membership adds another $35k to that.
     
  4. A.Goldberg macrumors 68020

    A.Goldberg

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    #4
    I agree with the others, it's not his problem that his mother is apparently well to do. His father was very successful, but mental defects don't descriminate.

    He was found to be mentally ill and has unlikely had a cushy life locked under psychiatric care. Better than prison yes, but he has been deemed by medical professionals as well as the legal system to have been not in control of his action by reason of mental illness.

    I'm happy the guy has been able to get the psychiatric care he needs, and has been set up to recieve futher care as he transitions back to the real word.

    He's not a thug, he was a psychotic young man that made a very big mistake. Being psychotic he wasn't living in the same reality you and I live in.

    As long as he continues with his therapy and demonstrates good behavior I don't see why he can't live in society now that he's been medically cleared. I'm sure he's on probation and intense monitoring. If he shows he cannot safely live in the real world, I'm sure they'll have no problem sending him back to the institutional setting.

    I work with similar people every day. Most haven't attempted murder but many have had legal issues due to their condition. Most of these people are good people with serious issues, no fault of their own.
     
  5. Savor Suspended

    Savor

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    Jun 18, 2010
    #5
    Makes me wonder how Jodie Foster feels about it?
     
  6. VulchR macrumors 68020

    VulchR

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    Scotland
  7. vrDrew macrumors 65816

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    Midlife, Midwest
    #7
    I'll be honest and say that I find a certain amount of comfort in the fact that we live in a society with a legal and mental health infrastructure that can see fit to release John Hinckley.

    Hinckley was found not guilty by reason of insanity for his actions in attempting to assassinate President Reagan. It was entirely appropriate that he should have been confined until such point that both mental health professionals and an impartial court, should determine that he no longer posed a danger to himself or others. The fact that our system of Justice is such that we can eventually release a person who shot our President speaks volumes about the essential humanity of our society.
     
  8. nbs2 macrumors 68030

    nbs2

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    A geographical oddity
    #8
    Legally, no. He was, at some point in his life, involuntarily committed. Question 11A, I think, but would need to look to confirm the question and specific phrasing.

    Illegally, just remember that many drugs are illegal for anybody to possess.
     

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