Le Pen refuses headscarf, nixes talks with Lebanon cleric

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by jkcerda, Feb 21, 2017.

  1. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #1
    https://www.yahoo.com/news/frances-le-pen-refuses-headscarf-meet-lebanons-mufti-084645765.html
    good for her. and kudos to the former first lady as well
     
  2. NT1440 macrumors G4

    NT1440

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    #2
    Cool....

    What's the point of this thread?
     
  3. jkcerda thread starter macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #3
    increase my post count for one :mad:
     
  4. ActionableMango macrumors 604

    ActionableMango

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    #5
  5. Solomani macrumors 68030

    Solomani

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    #6
    Well, you know President George Dubya and Obama would have gladly worn the headscarf, just to be diplomatic you know. Well maybe not Obama, because Michelle would threaten to beat him up if he did.
     
  6. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #7
    Things are bound to be change I think, as chess is having a comeback. Unfortunately the women divisions will be neglected for quite a while.
     
  7. Solomani macrumors 68030

    Solomani

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    #8
    I don't ever recall knowing a female (girl or grown woman) ever play chess…. like ever. I have known females that have done many other macho "guy things" ….. like lining up to see Star Wars premiers, or play Call of Duty with the guys on PS4, or even play Dungeons and Dragons with all the guys, or go snowboarding. I even know female co-workers who invite me to shoot with them on the gun range.

    But chess?! I've never seen one play that. From what I've seen…. only guys play chess.
     
  8. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #9
    Yeah posts don't count in the PRSI otherwise I'd be G4 by now.
     
  9. Septembersrain Contributor

    Septembersrain

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    #10
    I used to play chess. It's been a little while. It's not as fun as working on my car or putting a ROM on my Android though. So it's definitely not a daily hobby but something I'd do with another if they really wanted to.
     
  10. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #11
    There are more than you would think, and if only schools and people put a little bit more effort in it we would see many girls thrive in this incredible sport.

    Mariya Muzyychuk:

    [​IMG]

    Alexandra Kosteniuk:

    [​IMG]

    The Polgar Sisters:

    [​IMG]
     
  11. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #12
    What world do you live in?

    I used to play chess at school, and at home as a child and teenager: Actually, I played at school - both in the latter years of primary school and also in post primary school. Later still, I played as an undergrad at university.
     
  12. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #13
    Unfortunately in the US there is some stigma for girl playing chess, they are seen as an abnormality. I am sure that - and actually heard - some parents believe that if an opponent is a girl, that girl is just a reject that can't aim at the incredible cheer-leading team and is destined to a life of nerdy solitude.
     
  13. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #14
    I've never heard of a "stigma for a girl playing chess"

    I taught my daughters to play chess. The hardest part was teaching them the pawn attacks diagonally.
     
  14. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #15
    By playing of course I don't mean learning the moves, or beating some kids at school. I am talking about tournament players, USCF rated and so on. Girls that want to take it up a little bit more seriously.
    There is stigma for boys ("nerds", "geeks" etc.), and for girls it's much worse.
     
  15. Septembersrain Contributor

    Septembersrain

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    #16
    Yeah. When I played chess in high school and took shop class, I was looked at like I'd end up a cat lady.

    I went to a really weird school nicknamed "Cornfield high" because it was surrounded by... You get it. So out there you were a cheerleader, a home ec queen, good at sports or you slept around to get your popularity.

    There were different levels but a girl who could weld, solder, and knew about cars... Add in playing chess? Yeah, I stuck out like a sore thumb.
     
  16. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

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    #17
    nice deflections, but still kudos to le pen for telling the religious of peace and inclusion and whatever to shove it.
     
  17. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #18
    Well, I am a nerd, though that word didn't exist when I was a kid.

    And, thankfully, I am a European, and not subject to that nonsense.

    And, as you are from Italy, I assume that you have met highly educated Italian women - the kind who play chess - i certainly have and have woken with more than a few.

    Anyway, in primary school, my parents (at my request) bought me books on the American Civil war, medieval castles, the solar system, dinosaurs, Michael Faraday, chess sets, science sets, - my twelfth birthday present (my request) was William Shirer's "The Rise And Fall Of The Third Reich" (which I read, in a matter of days), - meanwhile, my mother's heroes were Gregor Mendel and Charles Darwin.

    In other words, wanting to learn, ask questions, read books, and exercise your mind were all encouraged when I grew up.

    My parents would have despised the world of cheer-leading: Both excelled at games (something which I did not inherit); if you wished to enter the playing field, they would have wanted you to do so as an active competitor, not as mere decoration.
    --- Post Merged, Feb 21, 2017 ---
    Oh, and check out the many, many photographs of the former German Chancellor, Helmut Schmidt, who played chess endlessly with Loki, his wife and life partner of more than 50 years, both of them concentrating on the board, cigarettes in hand, glass of wine, or beer, nearby, or cup of coffee to the side.
     
  18. yaxomoxay, Feb 21, 2017
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2017

    yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #19
    Well, I would not go as far as to say that Europeans don't have that nonsense. I remember that in the schools I attended anyone that was not born in Italy was secluded, especially Asians. Teachers were treating them like idiots, and students were just making fun of them. The only black student in my school during my 13 years in the school systems was born and raised in Italy, spoke perfect Italian, had the nationality, and was quite intelligent. Most of other students demeaned him for his colors, and went as far as telling him that he was not Italian because he was black. And teachers were not much different in their approach to their only black student.
    The only foreign (or "foreign looking) student I saw treated decently was a Peruvian kid... he was the go-to guy for a few drugs, so he was in the "cool" group.

    I think that Americans tend to have more "compartments" and tend to divide themselves because there is an increased need to find a group for some reason. That's probably why there is a group, an association, a foundation, or an academy on virtually anything... and they rarely talk to each other.

    As for me, I have always been the 'geek'; computer literate even before the advent of the Internet (and I have been insulted by a teacher, who yelled at me that I should give up stupid things like computer programming or learning about the internet because it will never succeed within our society. Also she told me that I was unable to learn English. Little did she know that computing brought me to the US where I speak English every single day... albeit imperfectly), and I always loved books and board games, especially chess (although I never really studied it consistently). My house has always been filled with books, several inherited by my ancestors... I think the oldest book we have is from 1550/1600 or so, a mathematical treatise.
     
  19. Scepticalscribe Contributor

    Scepticalscribe

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    #20
    No, but - in general, at least in the middle class - they are less intolerant of an intellectual - or cosmopolitan - existence.

    In the US, I get a strong sense of a society that distrusts an intellectual approach to matters, dislikes intellectuals, or the intelligentsia, and, above all, considers female intellectuals an aberration.
     
  20. yaxomoxay macrumors 68000

    yaxomoxay

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    #21
    I don't know, I truly don't. I don't think there is a dislike-o-meter that could gauge the situation in a more "scientific" approach. I heard praises and insults in both continents to similar situations. I think that the US has a much more variegated population than Europe, therefore it is easy for groups to get together and insult/attack what is at hand.

    Intellectualism in the US is much more activist than in Europe, in my opinion. Many intellectuals here end up being official advisers to the US government, the various state governments, or in many cases even companies. Some run for office. This is going to lead to some distrust. In Europe they tend to have more the role of 'observers' and 'commentators' than here.
     
  21. Zombie Acorn macrumors 65816

    Zombie Acorn

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    #22
    Tell these cavemen to shove the scarf up their ass.

    Also didn't realize Michelle Obama refused one in SA, good for her.
     
  22. obeygiant macrumors 68040

    obeygiant

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    #23
    Without her scarf, the lebonese cleric would have been overcome with lust and would have no choice but to have sex with her!
     
  23. b0fh666 macrumors 6502a

    b0fh666

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    #24
    with le pen? now thats extreme :)
     
  24. thekev macrumors 604

    thekev

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    #25
    Saudi Arabia imposes significantly more restrictive rules than Iran. I suspect part of that is that Iran's population isn't very religious, in spite of of the weird government. SA only gets a pass due to their official status as a US ally.
     

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