Lest We Forget

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Desertrat, Jun 6, 2007.

  1. Desertrat macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Location:
    Terlingua, Texas
    #1
    Sixty-three years ago, today. Over 10,000 casualties.

    A sad part, among other sad parts, is that had folks in the 1930s showed some guts and gumption, it wouldn't have been necessary.

    Ah, well. At least my father made it through...

    'Rat
     
  2. adroit macrumors 6502

    adroit

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2005
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
  3. Desertrat thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2003
    Location:
    Terlingua, Texas
    #3
    A History Channel program* said over 10,000 casualties. 2,400 at Omaha Beach, alone. "Casualties" is the combination of both dead and wounded.

    'Rat

    * "D-Day: The Lost Evidence".
     
  4. hulugu macrumors 68000

    hulugu

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2003
    Location:
    the faraway towns
    #4
    It goes back further than that.

    By 1910, World War I and World War II had become essentially destined by the rising conflicts in Europe.

    My grandfather managed to make it through as well.

    A drink to your and yours, and to all those who served and to those who do now.

    Cheers.
     
  5. sushi Moderator emeritus

    sushi

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2002
    Location:
    キャンプスワ&#
    #5
    Agree.

    'Rat thanks for remembering! :)

    Father served in WWII, Korea and Vietnam. Many uncles in WWII -- in every theater of the war.

    To add to 'Rat's comments:

    From: http://www.ddaymuseum.co.uk/faq.htm

    "Over 425,000 Allied and German troops were killed, wounded or went missing during the Battle of Normandy. This figure includes over 209,000 Allied casualties, with nearly 37,000 dead amongst the ground forces and a further 16,714 deaths amongst the Allied air forces. Of the Allied casualties, 83,045 were from 21st Army Group (British, Canadian and Polish ground forces), 125,847 from the US ground forces. The losses of the German forces during the Battle of Normandy can only be estimated. Roughly 200,000 German troops were killed or wounded. The Allies also captured 200,000 prisoners of war (not included in the 425,000 total, above). During the fighting around the Falaise Pocket (August 1944) alone, the Germans suffered losses of around 90,000, including prisoners."
     

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