Let's not put 100% of the blame for the antenna issues on Apple.

Discussion in 'iPhone' started by JoJoCal19, Jul 1, 2010.

  1. JoJoCal19 macrumors 65816

    JoJoCal19

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    #1
    I don't know why I just thought of this but I have not seen in mentioned in any of the other huge threads about the antenna/signal issue.

    What happened to carrier testing? Im sure AT&T does their own testing or they are atleast a part of testing the iPhone on their network in conjunction with Apple.

    I feel that if they knew of the issue through testing that they should take part in the blame.
     
  2. spartanrob macrumors 6502

    spartanrob

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    #2
    When ATT 're-provisionied' my phone last night, my 3g issues went away. Let's see what happens today, i may be on board with you.
     
  3. maflynn Moderator

    maflynn

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    #4
    We're blaming apple because they designed it, and the contracted the company to manufacture it and they presumably did the testing for it. Why should we blame the carrier. Plus we all know that AT&T is apple's lapdog Apple is the driving force in that relationship.

    This is all on apple.
     
  4. JoJoCal19 thread starter macrumors 65816

    JoJoCal19

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    #5
    Yes Apple deserves most of the blame but before any carrier releases a cell phone they put it through thorough testing. AT&T probably would have experienced this issue at some point in their testing, assuming they do test, and should have voiced their concerns.

    I agree AT&T does whatever Apple pretty much wants with regards to the iPhone however if they know about the issue and still agree to release it then they also deserve to have some blame thrown their way.
     
  5. Gagoots macrumors regular

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    #6
    My neighbor Fred down the street might be to blame too.

    Great post.
     
  6. samcraig macrumors P6

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    #7
    Yes - let's just start blaming ATT

    Oh wait - the SAME issue is happening all over the world - areas NOT covered by ATT

    Have a nice day.
     
  7. br0adband macrumors 6502a

    br0adband

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    #8
    DAMN!!! How could I have missed that? ;)
     
  8. carrotcloud macrumors member

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    #9
    people like you should be blamed for trying to blame others. Apple would have control every inch of the way leading upto release of iphone 4 and well pretty much everything. Seems like they even control your judgement.. FFS.
     
  9. icecavern macrumors regular

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    #10
    Yes don't blame Apple for field testing the new iPhone in a case to make it look like the old iPhone, which in effect would stop you touching the very thing causing the issue :confused:
     
  10. brightlights macrumors regular

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  11. JoJoCal19 thread starter macrumors 65816

    JoJoCal19

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    #12
    I never said not to blame Apple. I put most all of the blame on Apple.

    BUT, it is also the carriers (AT&T in this case because Im in the US) responsiblity to test products they are marketing and releasing on their network.

    I'm merely wondering why the hell AT&T didn't catch this issue in their testing. Or maybe they did and ignored it? Who knows.

    Fact is Verizon for example, is extremely stringent in their testing of phones and there have been delays in phones before because they've found issues, whether software or hardware.
     
  12. kdarling macrumors demi-god

    kdarling

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    #13
    Hands-off tests. When ATT tested the radio on the first iPhone, they were taken into Apple and only allowed access to test units without the real UI. It's quite likely that all technical testing is done with hands-off test rigs... the usual device and dummy setup.

    Cases. For a month or two before sales, a couple of hundred field testers use the device. Unfortunately it looks like everyone was required to use a case to hide the new look. (The original iPhone was also hidden within socks to make it look like a non-phone iPod.)

    Even if testers did notice, two more factors worked against piecing it together:

    Call drops are not uncommon on ATT and thus would not seem unusual as they would on say, Verizon.

    Apple's culture of secrecy means people aren't allowed to just chat about new devices in the hallways, where enough experience sharing could've brought the problem to light.
     
  13. asleep macrumors 68040

    asleep

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    #14
    Darn that Fred!!! :mad:
     
  14. carrotcloud macrumors member

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    #15
    and do you think apple would have let them? it's apples way or they go with another carrier. Don't be so naive. AT & T would have had no say in this matter.
     
  15. Daveoc64 macrumors 601

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    #16
    Exactly.

    By the time AT&T and the other carriers around the world got their hands on the device, it would have been too late.
     
  16. JoJoCal19 thread starter macrumors 65816

    JoJoCal19

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    #17
    Makes complete sense. Like someone else said, AT&T does what Apple says. Part of the problem is Apple's secrecy. They are so intent on 100% secrecy, this time it came back to bite them in the rear.
     
  17. bbplayer5 macrumors 68030

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    #18
    Re-provisioned?

    How did you get them to do that?
     
  18. -aggie- macrumors P6

    -aggie-

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    #19
    So, this really is a stealth “AT&T sucks and Verizon should have the iPhone” thread?
     
  19. JoJoCal19 thread starter macrumors 65816

    JoJoCal19

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    #20
    No, I actually don't have any issues with AT&T :) Their service has been pretty good here in FL. Fact remains carrier testing should be thorough and if a carrier finds any issues with a phone they should delay it's production/release and have the phone manufacturer fix it.
     
  20. spartanrob macrumors 6502

    spartanrob

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    #21
    I just called them up, explained the problem. They told me to turn the phone off and they did it. I think all you have to do is ask to be re-provisioned. Takes about 30 seconds
     
  21. samcraig macrumors P6

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    Jun 22, 2009
    #22
    Having worked for a major phone manufacturer I can share two things.

    1) Some phones are created with heavy carrier feedback as to what features they want or don't want in the phone. And because of how their networks work - what the software needs as far as specs. Apple doesn't work that way. Apple drives the ship completely. Clearly they communicate with carriers to make sure software is compatible with networks and such (a lot less of a concern these days with smart phones and the ability to have carrier profiles that are customized vs the old days)

    2) By the time the carrier gets the phones to test - they are already deep into production at a point where stopping production would be incredibly costly. If there was an issue - the manufacturer (in this case Apple) would call in a "bean counter" to determine cost of change in manufacturing vs cost of returns/loss.


    In short - too little, too late when the carrier gets the phone.
     
  22. JoJoCal19 thread starter macrumors 65816

    JoJoCal19

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    #23

    Good insight.
     
  23. rburly macrumors 6502a

    rburly

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    #24
    A smart move on Steve's part, rather than his "it's a non issue" comment, would have been to say that "in field testing we noticed no issues or problems with the iPhone 4". But he didn't.

    The better Apple PR move would have been "Maybe it's the carrier because it's certainly not the design of the phone". He reminds me of Nixon: "I am not a crook". Yeah Steve, we know how that turned out. (not saying Steve is a crook...hmmm)
     

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