Live Demo Jaguar

need2know02

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Jun 13, 2002
1
0
I attended a live demonstration of Jaguar at the University of South Australia a couple of days ago. It was very impressive and also included a couple of slides of the operating system architecture. I am new to mac and want to know how to get hold of the software. Can anyone help?
 

AmbitiousLemon

Moderator emeritus
Nov 28, 2001
3,413
0
down in Fraggle Rock
could to hear they are spreading the word. what was the demonstration for? were they showing it to developers or just trying to pitch the new system to schools since most schools are still using os9.

my father who teaches at a high school told me they came by and showed osx running on "one of those silly lamp macs" (little did he know i own a lamp mac).

its rather amazing schools are being so sluggish about using the new os. maybe apple is trying to take care of this.
 

sparkleytone

macrumors 68020
Oct 28, 2001
2,307
0
Greensboro, NC
you cannot get ahold of the software officially until it is released in august (i think). if you want to get OS X 10.1.x then all you need to do, besides owning a compaible Mac, is go to a CompUSA or Apple dealer near you and buy OS X. Its usually $129.
 

rugby

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2002
222
0
chicago
Originally posted by AmbitiousLemon

its rather amazing schools are being so sluggish about using the new os. maybe apple is trying to take care of this.

Well, being that I work at a school I'll give some insight. We have all sorts of Macs ranging from LC520's to 120 eMacs we just ordered. THere are a couple of factors that delay our switching to OS X:

1) hardware, most of our stuff is G3 or newer, but the vast majority isn't and wont' run X. Shoot, we have some original iMac labs that I wouldn't want to put X on even though it's supported.

2) software availability. We have some 5200 labs running software that's just about as old as these computers are. Even with Classic starting at login I don't think this is an acceptable solution. THis leads to my next point

3) cost to upgrade software. We have nearly 1000 machines in our district. The cost to upgrade to OS X compliant versions of our software would be astronomical. Now, Apple bundles a bunch of software with their computers so we're hoping we get enough copies of the included software we don't have to purchase extra copies.

4) Management software. WE run mac manager at our middle school and there is no OS X version available yet. When this becomes available, we will consider it.

5) teaching something new to teachers. No offense to teachers, but a lot of them are horrible students when it comes to learning something new. I shudder to think how many teachers STILL put their passwords on a post it and stick it to their monitor. I upgraded all our copies of Eudora from 3.1 to 5.1 and people flipped out, even though I tried to make it look as similar as the old one.

6) AMount of tech staff. We have 4 people servicing 1000 computers. Me and another guy do all software/hardware and we have a filemaker guru and then our boss who manages all of us. Now, for me to roll out an install of this magnitude I need some expert tools from APple, ASR/ARD/ANA just don't cut the mustard on this level.

These are just a few examples off the top of my head.
 

AmbitiousLemon

Moderator emeritus
Nov 28, 2001
3,413
0
down in Fraggle Rock
thank you for the response. obviously there are issues as you described however it is my belief that when you do not need to switch every single computer old and new. simply use osx when it comes on the new machines. the tools that are available for osx are many times more powerful and would make managing those machines much easier. just think about what you could do with remote desktop (which you can install on all the machines as long as you have an osx box to run the admin tool with). but what i see is schools buying brand new g4 towers rows and rows of them and then wiping the drives and installing os9. thats a lot of work. also managing an os9 system is much more work than managing an osx system. seems like if you just use osx on the new machines and get rid of old machines as the break or become obsolete then you would be saving yourself a lot of effort.

most of what you listed i would describe as excuses not 'examples.' i dont mean to sound like im attacking you, but it just seems that if schools started using the osx machines they have then they would have a lot fewer problems and a lot more software to choose from.
 

rugby

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2002
222
0
chicago
AmbitiousLemon-

I agree, that a lot of the reasons I stated are due more to lack of management and mainly time constraints. I was all for leaving X on them (which we are, we'll just boot into 9) but we have so much new software to teach teachers how to use this year (Office 2001, Appleworks 6, Filemaker Pro 5.5, and some other assessment crap I don't know anything about) that one more thing at this point isn't feasible. THe nice thing is that the following year we WILL be going to X at least at the middle school and should have a lot fewer problems because we're not dumping a whole bunch of other stuff on them at the same time.

The other tech guy who helps me update stuff is out sick for a long time so it's my duty to update all 5 schools to current versions of all our software. Applescript has been a huge plus.

ARD is nice, however I've been on the ARD list-serv and there are a LOT of complaints out there, like the inability to clone hard drives across a network. THat alone makes me not want to use it.
 

Rower_CPU

Moderator emeritus
Oct 5, 2001
11,219
0
San Diego, CA
rugby-

I too work in education, in a lab setting at a 4 year university.

There are definitely training concerns with a new OS, or any other piece of software. Thankfully, Apple is working with educational institutions to help smooth out this process. Speak with your Apple rep regarding training for your users and your technical staff.

Security and lab management issues are one of the main things that prevent people from moving to OS X. I suggest you check out http://macosxlabs.org (if you haven't already) for info on what other people in our situation are doing.

ARD doesn't do everything that ANA did, but it's getting there and will most likely be there in a subsequent version. There are ways of cloning HDs...they're just not straightforward. We should be getting it in my lab soon, so I'll be able to tell you my experience if you want. I'm on that list too, and I hope we don't get bitten by any of those bugs others are seeing.
 

rugby

macrumors regular
Feb 21, 2002
222
0
chicago
Rower, thanks for the link. Our main problem is lack of a mac manager type solution. Sure I could use Netinfo and have all the workstations be children to the server's parent but with nearly 150 people logged on at the same time it would kill our network. We do have 10/100 switched networks at our middle school yet our elementary schools are still mostly 10bt (sad I know). Yet, cost is a huge factor. We could blow our whole budget just by purchasing switches for our 4 elementary schools, and nobody would get anything else that year.
 

MacUser1

macrumors 6502
Aug 23, 2001
334
0
CT
OS X in Education

I know someone who works in the local school district and they have informed me that they will be making the switch to OS X this summer. Training classes have already begun and all of the teachers are approving the switch.
 

Raiden

macrumors regular
Jun 14, 2002
147
0
Hello, I goto school (Junior in HS) in Henrico County, Virginia, the place where they gave everyone iBooks.

I personally think it would be a great if they switched to X over the summer, but I dont forsee that happening. As rugby pointed out, for any group of people, upgrading a couple thousand iBooks to X would take forever. Also, pointed out, the teachers are already pissed off because they were forced to learn mac 9, I shudder thinking what they would do if they had to re-learn a whole new OS (X) again. They would probly go on strike!

Also, even though I love X, many of my friends dont. Last year, before they put all these stupid blocks on the computers (and before they deleted X off the iBooks), everyone knew howto change the startup disk to X. It was very slow, because the iBooks we have dont have good system specs (600Mz/64Mb/10Gigs). Most of my friends had grew up on mac 9, and as typical teens, they are all too lazy to change.

The only great thing about X right now for the student education market is Apple Remote Desktop, cause the teachers could monitor what everyone is doing.

bye.
 
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