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bobright

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
4,816
34
So im looking to upgrade from my old iMac that lasted me id say a long while. It barely boots up and has a clicking hard drive sound. It’s time to upgrade. I want to stick with iMac as that machine has treated me well and I like an all in one machine.

I want to be sure I’m not missing or skimping out on something that I’ll later regret. As we know these are custom buil4 machines a return would prob be a hassle. Does this look good and like it’d be future proofed for the next handful of years at least?

IMG_8917.png
 

JustAnExpat

macrumors 65816
Nov 27, 2019
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Does this look good and like it’d be future proofed for the next handful of years at least?
I think it'll last you for at least 10 years, maybe longer. There's supposed to be "AI powered stuff" in the new M4 chips, but I'm not impressed at all by any "AI powered stuff" so far, so I don't think you'll be missing out on anything.
 

kagharaht

macrumors 68000
Oct 7, 2007
1,552
1,066
Hardware performance, fit and finish has been beyond expectation. The weakest link is Mac OS 14. At least a quick erase all settings fixed my issues. This experience has not given me confidence with Apple quality with the OS.
 

wilberforce

macrumors 68030
Aug 15, 2020
2,891
3,164
SF Bay Area
I want to be sure I’m not missing or skimping out on something that I’ll later regret. As we know these are custom buil4 machines a return would prob be a hassle. Does this look good and like it’d be future proofed for the next handful of years at least?
Returning a custom built machine is absolutely not a hassle (assuming you live in country where Apple offers the 14-day return period, and you order directly from Apple). They will send you a box to return it, free shipping, no questions asked (you don't need any reason to return it.)
It is Apple's marketing model, so returns are guilt-free also. (They will resell it as a refurb)
 
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smirking

macrumors 68040
Aug 31, 2003
3,776
3,759
Silicon Valley
Seconding everything everyone above said. What you ordered ought to do you well for a good long time. If you're getting by on a 2012 iMac in 2024, you've got average daily needs at best. Get anything you want. Even a base model is going to be perfectly fine.

I'm a developer and a photographer. I have a few heavy workflows. It's not anything nearly as intense as 3D rendering and animation, but I hit my machines pretty hard and I was able to move everything from a 32GB i7 2018 Vega20 to an 8GB 13" M1 MBP for a couple of weeks and not miss a beat.

That says something about how different the capabilities of the two platforms are.
 
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Fishrrman

macrumors Penryn
Feb 20, 2009
28,596
12,713
OP:
"Anything that I’m missing or will regret later down the line?"

My advice would be...
Get at least 16gb of RAM.
If you don't, you will REGRET it later on down the line.

Get at least a 512gb SSD, preferably a 1tb SSD.
If you don't, you will REGRET it later on down the line.

Ahem... I should have read further -- looks like you've already taken care of that, so I don't think you'll regret the purchase!
 

steve123

macrumors 65816
Aug 26, 2007
1,056
636
You may want to consider more RAM. The additional 8GB is probably worth it if you plan to keep the machine for as long as your last one. macOS will evolve and memory requirements will increase.

You may also want to wait a few days until WWDC and see if Apple announces new iMac's.
 
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Rainman1915

macrumors member
Sep 17, 2020
45
37
The only change I would recommend is the get the keyboard with the numeric keypad,I wish mine had that.
 

JustAnExpat

macrumors 65816
Nov 27, 2019
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You may want to consider more RAM. The additional 8GB is probably worth it if you plan to keep the machine for as long as your last one. macOS will evolve and memory requirements will increase.

You may also want to wait a few days until WWDC and see if Apple announces new iMac's.
When was the last time Apple increased RAM like that? And 8GB of RAM has been the standard for 80 months (4 GB was standard for 71 months, and 2GB was standard for 44 months). I can't see him outgrowing 16 GB of RAM for general use for over 20 years, and I can't see Apple requiring a minimum of 24GB of RAM for MacOS while still supporting the M3 processor.
 

JavaMania5

macrumors newbie
Aug 25, 2015
24
16
Rockford Illinois
I made the same purchase in December. Very nice upgrade and my transition from a 27" to a 24" went better than I expected. No complaints but 2 things I wish I would have investigated further. I do miss the full keyboard with numeric pad but that is something I can pick up later. The other thing I should have considered was my apps. I needed to do some upgrades to a couple of apps and I lost 1 app and it is not compatible with the M3 ( Apple changed a sharing capability) and now that app is useless. Still working one one other app but its probably something I did incorrectly. I see no reason to hold out to a M4. Enjoy your new iMac.
 
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bobright

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
4,816
34
You may want to consider more RAM. The additional 8GB is probably worth it if you plan to keep the machine for as long as your last one. macOS will evolve and memory requirements will increase.

You may also want to wait a few days until WWDC and see if Apple announces new iMac's.
When will that take place?
 

steve123

macrumors 65816
Aug 26, 2007
1,056
636
When was the last time Apple increased RAM like that? And 8GB of RAM has been the standard for 80 months (4 GB was standard for 71 months, and 2GB was standard for 44 months). I can't see him outgrowing 16 GB of RAM for general use for over 20 years, and I can't see Apple requiring a minimum of 24GB of RAM for MacOS while still supporting the M3 processor.
The OP never described the use case. For a long term use case as described there is a benefit to have more memory installed at purchase where the machine is not upgradable after purchase.

Another view point about memory:
Whatever Apple or YouTubers want you to believe, 32GB RAM is NOT enough for professional workflow unless you want to open and close apps constantly. I would say 64GB is the minimum, also don't be fooled by 36 or 48 with M3 Max chips. On M3's OS uses more RAM than on M1 or M2 so you're left with less.

With M3 Max you should only choose 64, 96, or 128 variants.
 

JustAnExpat

macrumors 65816
Nov 27, 2019
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The OP never described the use case. For a long term use case as described there is a benefit to have more memory installed at purchase where the machine is not upgradable after purchase.

Another view point about memory:
What type of "professional work" can be done with a 2012 Fusion iMac, and what type of work is he doing now? If his 2012 Fusion iMac is just barely good for his needs now, an M3 iMac would last him for at least 15 years.
 

bobright

macrumors 601
Original poster
Jun 29, 2010
4,816
34
What type of "professional work" can be done with a 2012 Fusion iMac, and what type of work is he doing now? If his 2012 Fusion iMac is just barely good for his needs now, an M3 iMac would last him for at least 15 years.
I’m definitely a casual user. I’ve had iPhones every year since they dropped so I’m kinda stuck in there ecosystem. I love the simplicity of Mac though and an all in one machine. I want that 1TB as I have a huge iTunes library. The most extensive stuff I do is sometimes record music in Logic but nothing heavy or beyond vocals.
 
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ignatius345

macrumors 604
Aug 20, 2015
7,083
11,658
So im looking to upgrade from my old iMac that lasted me id say a long while. It barely boots up and has a clicking hard drive sound. It’s time to upgrade. I want to stick with iMac as that machine has treated me well and I like an all in one machine.

I want to be sure I’m not missing or skimping out on something that I’ll later regret. As we know these are custom buil4 machines a return would prob be a hassle. Does this look good and like it’d be future proofed for the next handful of years at least?

View attachment 2382000
I have an M1 with those same specs and it's still doing just great with a boatload of multitasking and graphic design work -- even as I keep it logged into to multiple user accounts. Have to assume the M3 would be that much better.

Love absolutely everything about it, with the sole exception being a desire for a bit more display space at times. Still, the display is bright, accurate and great to look at all day.
 

ignatius345

macrumors 604
Aug 20, 2015
7,083
11,658
What type of "professional work" can be done with a 2012 Fusion iMac, and what type of work is he doing now? If his 2012 Fusion iMac is just barely good for his needs now, an M3 iMac would last him for at least 15 years.
Sound excruciating to me too, but with a little patience I bet you could still get stuff done... eventually :)
 
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JustAnExpat

macrumors 65816
Nov 27, 2019
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Sound excruciating to me too, but with a little patience I bet you could still get stuff done... eventually :)
Then again, what is "professional work"? For all what we know, he could be a writer using Scrivener all day. Scrivener should run acceptable on a 2012 iMac.
 
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ignatius345

macrumors 604
Aug 20, 2015
7,083
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Then again, what is "professional work"? For all what we know, he could be a writer using Scrivener all day. Scrivener should run acceptable on a 2012 iMac.
True. We're definitely at the point where pretty much any Mac capable of booting up should be able to handle basic productivity pretty well.
 
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