Mac hard drive test software - creating the definitive list

B-Eugen

macrumors member
Jul 26, 2014
66
16
If you have bad sectors on a hard drive the only way to correct them is to re-map them and that usually means zeroing the drive. An SSD shouldn't ever need to have that done manually because they're supposed to auto correct them once detected. Some of the applications on the market are pretty old (TechTool Pro and Drive Genius) and you used to be able to try sector repairs but nowadays I believe that's nearly impossible, or at least not recommended as you'll run the risk of zeroing out data right in the middle of a file.

With hard drives now costing so little, why even bother with a repair attempt anymore?
 

Partron22

macrumors 68030
Apr 13, 2011
2,535
735
Yes

B-Eugen

macrumors member
Jul 26, 2014
66
16
I suspect that what NASA uses and the rest of us get stuck with….errrrrr…I mean have available to us are two entirely different things. :)
 

OldGuyTom

macrumors regular
Sep 6, 2013
156
33
US
With hard drives now costing so little, why even bother with a repair attempt anymore?
Probably because in the case of laptops for a lot of people it's easier to try and fix what's in place, if it's fixable and not serious damage, than it is to replace the drive. Replacing the drive for some people is like asking them to perform open heart surgery.
 

B-Eugen

macrumors member
Jul 26, 2014
66
16
It depends on the laptop. If you've ever seen one of the original Intel MacBook's all you needed to do was open the battery case, take off the RAM protector, and slide the disk out and in. It's too bad Apple (and everyone else) doesn't make it that easy to change a drive.

That feature was awesome!
 

ZVH

macrumors 6502
Original poster
Apr 14, 2012
381
51
Most Apple computers aren't that difficult to work on except some of the earlier PPC units. Replacing an optical drive in of the 12" models was a complete nightmare. With the rest it's usually just take off the bottom and you're almost there. Some iMacs can be a PIA in my opinion.
 

TheBSDGuy

macrumors 6502
Jan 24, 2012
317
29
Getting the keyboard off a 15" aluminum Power Book was preposterous. Why all the screws? What was Apple thinking.
 

Gouvea

macrumors newbie
May 28, 2019
19
0
São Paulo, Brazil
I'm having a problem with my external HD's being ejected (see post here) and I suspect that one of these HD's might have some problem that is causing this unintended ejections.

Can anyone tell me if there's a reliable software to analyze and detect possible failures on these HD's? One of them is new (bought in oct/2019).
 

Gouvea

macrumors newbie
May 28, 2019
19
0
São Paulo, Brazil
I'm having a problem with my external HD's being ejected (see post here) and I suspect that one of these HD's might have some problem that is causing this unintended ejections.

Can anyone tell me if there's a reliable software to analyze and detect possible failures on these HD's? One of them is new (bought in oct/2019).
Anyone, please?