Mac OS X, malware, hackers, root and so on - can anyone make sense of this?

Discussion in 'macOS' started by simsaladimbamba, Aug 13, 2014.

  1. simsaladimbamba

    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2010
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    located
    #1
    Sorry to so blatantly ask you for your help, but my knowledge is limited when it comes to those shiny things with videos on it, and I cannot make sense of the following I read on a comment somewhere.

    As far as I understand that mangled piece of text, the person believes the entire internet is used to deliver viruses to Windows and Mac OS X networks. I can somehow understand that, as it has been proven, that the www and other internet services have been used to deliver malware to computers.
    What I do not understand is the "RANSOMWARE attacking networks" part.
    MacDefender was in a way ransomware, but it left the users still capable of using the computer.
    Then there was the FBI and other ransomware, which locked the browser of your choice and prevented you from using it, unless you would reset it.
    Has there been other ranswomware attacking networks?​


    I am a bit lost here, it sounds a lot like gibberish, but to be honest, I could just be too dumb to understand it.​


    As far as I understand, JDK8 is the "Java SE Development Kit 8", which according to Oracle, the official provider of the JDK8, is available for Mac OS X, and that JDK8 has nothing to do with a Mac being protected from malware.
    The second sentence again sounds like gibberish, especially since the port 25565 is an official Minecraft port supporting TCP but not UDP.​


    More gibberish I suppose (?), as it does not make any sense to me.
    I did not know, that there are more hackers than there are Windows admins or Mac OS X root users, but I guess since no official statistics exist, one can never tell?
    As for the "virus through one port" part, I am not that knowledgable to verify such statement, as I haven't found an article or FAQ to provide help with that. I only found a trojan that abused port 17300 and called itself "Kuang2 the virus".
    The last sentence really sounds like gibberish.

    If anyone can shed some light on this, I would be grateful and less arsy the next time around.
    I suppose the entire text is just someone knowing some bits about Minecraft and Java and combining all those shiny words into a wall of text to come off as knowledgable.

    Yeah, no mirror here. lalalalala
     
  2. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

    Joined:
    May 16, 2008
    #2
    I don't know where you found such comments, but it's very likely that the reason you can't make sense of it is whoever made the comments doesn't have a clue what they're talking about.
     
  3. simsaladimbamba thread starter Guest

    simsaladimbamba

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    #3
    That was my initial reaction too, but as you know, I am not that good with the inner workings of computers, especially when it comes to root (except when Amy Acker is involved) or ports (my days of port forwarding for emule are more than a decade ago, attacking networks (okay, I attacked some with my not so flush Firewire 800 cables and RJ45 ports, but hey, that is just like a marriage between PS/2 and USB - funky), malware (okay, I got that one battery virus some days ago) and Java (I guess porn was used to deliver Java at some time, or the other way around) and Minecraft (do not have the patience for building blocks, I am more of a destroyer of worlds).

    Hmm, we'll see.
     
  4. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #4
    The only way I can make any sense out of the JDK8 gibberish is if I interpret it as saying that because Mac OS doesn't have JDK8 it has an earlier Java version, and those earlier versions have unpatched vulnerabilities. Depending on when the gibberish was written, OS X may not have had a JDK8 at the time. With no sense of when it was written, it's impossible to guess what else it might mean.

    Port 25565 is commonly used for Minecraft servers. A Minecraft server is often written in Java (maybe always in Java; I'm not sure, I don't follow Minecraft).

    If there's a vulnerability in Java versions earlier than JDK8, and that vulnerability is exposed when running a Minecraft server, then running a Minecraft server on one of those vulnerable Java versions could expose your OS X box to remote exploits. Without further details, which I'd probably have to spend time looking up and tracking down, it's impossible to say if that's what the rant about port 25565 is all about.

    If a Minecraft server on port 25565 is what the entire thing is about, then the most obvious way to avoid the vulnerability is to not run a Minecraft server. Changing the port wouldn't hide or fix the vulnerability. Not running a Minecraft server will. Actually, if the vulnerability is exposed by running any Java server (I'm unaware of vulnerabilities specific to a port-number), then one would need to refrain from all Java servers, not just Minecraft.

    In any case, all the above is predicated on there not being a JDK8 on OS X.
    But now there is a JDK8, so it seems moot to me.

    If I had to dig into this further, I'd be looking for info on Java vulnerabilities that were exposed when running Minecraft servers, and any exploits resulting from that. Java and port 25565 are the only concrete clues. All the rest is just opinion or gibberish.
     
  5. simsaladimbamba thread starter Guest

    simsaladimbamba

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    #5
    Thanks, sadly it is from today, but I have found out, that the commentator is interested in Minecraft and just posted gibberish.
     
  6. chown33 macrumors 604

    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2009
    #6
    Maybe he's not a native speaker of English. It's still disjointed, and incorrect regarding JDK8.

    If his point is that:
    (OS X) + (Java < JDK8) + (Minecraft server) = vulnerable

    I'm certain he could have it expressed it more succinctly, in addition to correcting the obvious error about JDK8 existence.
     

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