Macbook 1,1 The final upgrade – Need some help

Discussion in 'MacBook' started by timberford, Feb 27, 2011.

  1. timberford macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    #1
    I'm about ready to embrace the smaller space of an SSD in exchange for the performance boost. So I thought i'd better check if there's anything I need to be aware of before I make the purchase.

    A bit of background on the upgrades/maintenance I've performed on my trusty old Macbook 1,1 over the years...

    - Maxed out the Ram to 2gb
    - Upgraded to Wireless N
    - Installed a 500gb Western Digital HDD (5400rpm)
    - 1 x new battery
    - Cleaned out the fan and replaced the thermal paste
    - Installed Snow Leopard

    I've done a lot of searching on this forum and reading around and it sounds like I'm not going to get the full benefit due to only having SATA. However, I figure this should mean that I can just get a cheaper SSD with slower transfer rates? Is that right?

    Also I have heard some people mentioning hibernation issues with ome manufacturers, is this a major problem?

    So far this Kingston drive looks like a decent bargain... http://www.ebuyer.com/product/247005

    I saw it mentions TRIM but I understand this isn't supported yet?

    Basically I'm after a drive circa 60gb, so any recommendations from first hand use would be greatly appreciated!
     
  2. AndyK macrumors 65816

    AndyK

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    #2
    Is it really worth going from 500gb storage too 64gb, for what will be quite a minor speed increase for what I expect you use the macbook for?

    Are you not then going too end up relying on back up / usb drives too get at your stuff? Especially since as you mention you're going too be using it at the slower rates anyway. If you really want (read: need) that kind of performance in a laptop, get a new MBP.

    Also, is your macbook a Core 2 Duo? Since if not you're not going too even be able too use Lion & its new features (trim etc) anyway.

    Edit: Realistically you're not going too see much of an increase in an older machine, especially when Lion comes. If you're not willing too shell out for a new laptop too benefit from all the techology increases, then keep the bigger HDD and make use of the space in one place.
     
  3. SkippyThorson macrumors 65816

    SkippyThorson

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Location:
    Utica, NY
    #3
    Macbook 1,1 is a Intel 'Core Solo'. Not a Core 2 Duo or even Core Duo - if I remember correctly.

    So you may see a very minimal gain using an SSD, but it's not worth +80% storage loss in my opinion. If I were you, I'd keep the 500gb HD 10 times out of 10 if given the option between that and a 64gb SSD.
     
  4. GfulDedFan macrumors 65816

    GfulDedFan

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2007
    Location:
    Indiana
    #4
    Have you considered a 7200rpm HDD? My 1,1 has 2GB of RAM and a 320GB WD Scorpio Black and it seems to run well.
     
  5. timberford thread starter macrumors newbie

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2006
    #5
    Thanks for the replies guys.

    It's interesting you say the performance boost would be minor. I have heard other accounts that say installing an SSD, in an old Macbook, made it feel like entirely new machine. That it was actually quite a significant speed increase.

    As I mentioned, I'm happy to lose the space. I think if I was to upgrade I would be looking at a Macbook Air, so i'd have to get used to reduced storage anyway. If anything this could work nicely as a cheap trial run to see if I can mange it.

    Plus even if I did upgrade now, it's not like i'd throw this laptop out, so I'm definitely looking to make it last as long as I can. Especially as a ~60gb SSD can be had pretty cheap, so if it adds another year or more onto the life of the machine then that's worth it in my eyes.

    Am I right in thinking that SSD's run at a much lower temperature? Cause it would be nice to have it run cooler.
     
  6. AndyK macrumors 65816

    AndyK

    Joined:
    Jan 10, 2008
    #6
    I think the bigger question, is why you want too sacrifice 90% of your hard drive space for a technology your laptop barely supports and when the operating system is updated too support its features, your laptop wont be able too run anyway.

    You're much better off upgrading to a 7200rpm drive. These are quite awesome, I'm getting one myself next month. Personally, as a user of the latest edition of macbook that will support the various features Lion will bring, I'm still not going for an SSD, simply because what's the point in spending that for so little space, when a 7200rmp drive will easily out perform any tasks you're likely too give it anyway.

    If you you need super high performance, you don't budget too buy a macbook, you buy a macbook pro.

    At the end of the day you do what you feel is best, but really, the SSD is a waste compared too the 7200rmp drives you can get for the same cost.
     
  7. SkippyThorson macrumors 65816

    SkippyThorson

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Location:
    Utica, NY
    #7
    Well, to be honest, you've just gotta think about what a hard drive does. Hard drives hold your files and all the little bits and pieces of your applications that allows them to exist and run. Once a program runs, or a file is open, it's up to the ram to determine how those open things are manipulated and used until they close.

    The only performance boost you'll see is launching applications and opening files. That's about the only time that the HD really has to "work hard", and the only reason you'll see a large jump when using a solid state drives that don't have to move parts to accomplish what HDs do.

    It won't add a year or more of life to your laptop, it'll add about 5. :p SSDs are great, and the fact of the matter is, 99% of the time, you can totally erase the fear of the dead drive from your mind. They're like Saturns - they just don't die.

    Yup, you would be right. Again, it's not a spectacular gain, but in this department, it'll be a noticeable one. Like I mentioned before. SSDs are exactly what their name states - solid. Standard hard drives and their moving parts can generate a decent amount of heat when working with a lot of files, and it gets spinning.

    The feature of the Macs that allow HDs to "sleep" when possible really helps standard HDs, and I suppose that you wouldn't necessarily have to use that feature with an SSD if you really didn't want to. You'd also see some performance gains in having an SSD in that scenario as well, because standard HDs have to "wake up" when they need to be used after "sleeping".

    SO! In conclusion, if you think it's worth it, and you don't mind losing the space, by all means, there's no reason not to go for it - especially if you get a great deal on one. Personally, I'd never do it, but if you want to, there's no reason not to do something you want. If you have the means and decide it's right, go for it! :)
     
  8. ayeying macrumors 601

    ayeying

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2007
    Location:
    Yay Area, CA
    #8
    It is a Core Duo. Only the beginnings of the Mac Mini had Core Solo.

    You'll see a bit of improvement, but only relating to basic tasks such as opening applications and boot times.
     
  9. SkippyThorson macrumors 65816

    SkippyThorson

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2007
    Location:
    Utica, NY
    #9
    2 things about this post I missed out on in my huge speech.

    A) Correct, I thought wrong. MacBooks began as Core Duos.
    B) The one thing I didn't mention was booting. You will see a pretty good drop in overall boot time.
     

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