Making/Creating a Distraction Free Laptop

niceties55

macrumors newbie
Original poster
Dec 18, 2017
9
0
I know that distraction-free laptop are popular these days and I can see how they can be helpful. The only problem is they are super expensive, especially for what they do!

My question is, how hard is it to make one using a Raspberry Pi, an older Chromebook using a Linux distro, or an older Mac/PC using Linux?

Thanks! :)
 

sracer

macrumors G3
Apr 9, 2010
8,501
9,009
Prescott Valley, AZ
I know that distraction-free laptop are popular these days and I can see how they can be helpful. The only problem is they are super expensive, especially for what they do!

My question is, how hard is it to make one using a Raspberry Pi, an older Chromebook using a Linux distro, or an older Mac/PC using Linux?

Thanks! :)
What is your definition of a "distraction-free" laptop? I've never heard of that. I HAVE heard of distraction-free writing devices... and I have one, an Alphasmart Neo 2. It's a great little device with a terrific keyboard. I've installed some additional fonts on it to allow for more lines on the screen. There are a ton of them for sale on eBay (I bought mine in mint condition for $25).


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macrumors regular
Nov 21, 2019
171
454
I uninstall all non-essential apps on all my Macs (Chess, Photobooth, Games, ect). Disable SIP and you can remove whatever you want, even Siri.
 

c0ppo

macrumors 65816
Feb 11, 2013
1,432
2,667
Tbh, I never even heard of such a thing, what are distraction free laptops?
Never heard of those either. On Mac/Windows, all I do is install freedom.to app, block some apps/websites, and voila, I have a distraction free laptop. Easy.
 

maflynn

Moderator
Staff member
May 3, 2009
65,650
31,867
Boston
Never heard of those either. On Mac/Windows, all I do is install freedom.to app, block some apps/websites, and voila, I have a distraction free laptop. Easy.
To be honest, my MBP when I owned one, and my Thinkpad are fairly well distraction free. That being the cause it does seem like I'm missing what the OP is trying to express.
 

sracer

macrumors G3
Apr 9, 2010
8,501
9,009
Prescott Valley, AZ
To be honest, my MBP when I owned one, and my Thinkpad are fairly well distraction free. That being the cause it does seem like I'm missing what the OP is trying to express.
At the root of it, the concept of "distraction-free" is to address a person's lack of self-control. The idea is to create hurdles that require effort to overcome if a person wants to do something other than the current task at hand.

What distraction-free looks like depends highly upon the individual and what their task is. For some, it can be as simple as disabling WiFi... that won't work if you need to work online. For others, it could mean disabling notifications.

And for still others, simply the existence of a web browser is considered a distraction. :)
 

c0ppo

macrumors 65816
Feb 11, 2013
1,432
2,667
To be honest, my MBP when I owned one, and my Thinkpad are fairly well distraction free. That being the cause it does seem like I'm missing what the OP is trying to express.
Some of us are procrastinators. I'm not shy to admit that I fall into that category. I can binge watch series or youtube videos all day and night. I used to game a lot, now I don't game at all.

When I decide to work, I block certain apps, websites and services using freedom app. And when I get tired, I take a walk or go out for a cup of coffee. No more youtube/netflix/games.

To be honest, without something like freedom, I probably would still procrastinate a lot. And I do mean a lot. It's a nasty habit that's really hard to get rid of.
 
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skaertus

macrumors 68040
Feb 23, 2009
3,350
460
Brazil
At the root of it, the concept of "distraction-free" is to address a person's lack of self-control. The idea is to create hurdles that require effort to overcome if a person wants to do something other than the current task at hand.

What distraction-free looks like depends highly upon the individual and what their task is. For some, it can be as simple as disabling WiFi... that won't work if you need to work online. For others, it could mean disabling notifications.

And for still others, simply the existence of a web browser is considered a distraction. :)
Agree.

I don't buy into this "distraction-free" stuff. First there were distraction-free word processors, which were simply stripped off features so people would not get distracted. Now there are distraction-free computers with close to zero features so people is not distracted by other software.

What people should get instead is discipline and self-control, instead of justifying a never-ending search for additional devices.

I use Microsoft Word on a powerful full-featured computer and it is very useful. Word provides all the help you need with all its features such as cross-references, styles and grammar correction. With just a little self-control, you can keep those helpful features and avoid being dragged by more attractive stuff such as a web browser.
 
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LeeW

macrumors 65816
Feb 5, 2017
1,053
1,481
Glasgow, Scotland
The only devices I have ever seen that are distraction-free, and it is a thing, are for writers. Focus on just one thing and don't get distracted by anything else.

I think the answer lies in the user learning to be focussed whatever device they use, not trying to build a device to counter your inability to focus.
 

PeterJP

macrumors 6502
Feb 2, 2012
495
289
Leuven, Belgium
I always disable all notifications, except for the calendar, which I manage tightly when things come in. Same on my phone and my Mac (phone does ring when somebody calls or texts me, though). Notifications and messages and pop-ups and the like are disastrous for any kind of workflow, no matter whether you're going "distraction free" or not.
 
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