Man sentenced to life in prison after fifth DWI arrest


TonyC28

macrumors 68000
Aug 15, 2009
1,563
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USA
It doesn't say in any of the articles whether or not he had a drivers license at the time of his latest arrest. I'm assuming with his history he didn't. I'd like to think there must be something other than prison for this guy, but unless there is some other way to prevent him from driving I don't know what else they could do.
 

Gutwrench

Contributor
Jan 2, 2011
3,921
9,048
Wow. He was on quite a cocktail in the last deuce. Life means what in this case in Texas?
 

Raid

macrumors 68020
Feb 18, 2003
2,144
3,927
Toronto
I can't view the video for some reason and the text is short... however with 5 DUI convictions I don't have a lot of sympathy. Maybe life is a little much, 25 years (judging by the guys mug shot) might be a life sentence anyway. I hope as part of his che'll serve on highway clean up crews and see first hand the results of such behaviour.
 
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Mousse

macrumors 68020
Apr 7, 2008
2,047
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Flea Bottom, King's Landing
He's been CAUGHT five times. No telling how many times he's actually driven drunk. Better to take him off the road before he kills someone or an entire family.

Life in prison for drunk driving? I would have to see his history to see if anyone has been injured during his drunken escapades. Locking him away for life if he's injured someone before I can get behind. If he hasn't harmed anyone, then it's a bit excessive.
 

jkcerda

macrumors 6502a
Original poster
Jun 10, 2013
682
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Criminal Mexi Midget
I can't view the video for some reason and the text is short... however with 5 DUI convictions I don't have a lot of sympathy. Maybe life is a little much, 25 years (judging by the guys mug shot) might be a life sentence anyway. I hope as part of his che'll serve on highway clean up crews and see first hand the results of such behaviour.
62 years old and has already served 12 years for past convictions, he was LOADED on this one with pot/xanax & booze .
 

BoxerGT2.5

macrumors 68000
Jun 4, 2008
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11,139
https://www.yahoo.com/news/man-sentenced-life-prison-fifth-015735359.html

moron already served about 12 years from past convictions but Life is a bit much, give him 25 years.
1. The fact that he hasn't killed anyone yet is a miracle. If someone was running around with a AR-15 shooting at random in public and missing everyone (doing it multiple times mind you) we'd have no issue with locking him up for good.

2. The guy is 62, 25yrs would put him at 87. My guess is his liver won't even make it that long, 25yrs is a life sentence all things considered.
 

ActionableMango

macrumors G3
Sep 21, 2010
9,267
6,253
My grandfather was killed by a drunk driver.

Despite that, I have a tiny little bit of mercy for a first time offender. But after that, they can go to hell.
 
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MarkusL

macrumors 6502
Jun 1, 2014
462
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1. The fact that he hasn't killed anyone yet is a miracle. If someone was running around with a AR-15 shooting at random in public and missing everyone (doing it multiple times mind you) we'd have no issue with locking him up for good.

2. The guy is 62, 25yrs would put him at 87. My guess is his liver won't even make it that long, 25yrs is a life sentence all things considered.
However, if he does get out at 87 he will drive worse than a drunk even if he stays sober. :eek:
 
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LizKat

macrumors 603
Aug 5, 2004
5,338
29,956
Catskill Mountains
House arrest, don't take someone's life away from them if you have other means to prevent them from being a direct danger to other's lives.
Yep. Although in this case maybe weld that bracelet onto his ankle.

This country has an incarceration fetish.
Yes it does. It doesn't make sense as long as privatization of prisons stays out of the picture. There are other idiocies in the system as well and some of them can distort due process. For instance country prosecutors working against a tight budget may bump the charge and hope the guy ends up in the state slam instead of county jail...

We have a dumbass epidemic.
Yes well, that too is a problem.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,670
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This is a waste of tax dollars. I suspect they could prevent him from driving for far less than the cost of keeping him in prison for 25 years.
 
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samcraig

macrumors P6
Jun 22, 2009
16,610
35,211
USA
From the DMV. As a repeat offender - the charges go from misdemeanor (if no one or property was unharmed) to felony. This guy - as a member of the 5 timer club gets the potential of all the following prizes...

Felony DUI Penalties
Typically, felony drunk driving convictions are similar to misdemeanors; however, they're much harsher versions.

Some common felony DUI penalties include:
  • Extremely high fines.
  • License suspension or revocation.
    • You'll also receive points on your driving record.
    • Your conviction could stay on your driving record for years or even forever, depending on state laws.
    • Depending on the number of DUI convictions you have, your driving privileges might never be restored.
  • Ignition interlock device.
  • Alcohol and/or drug counseling programs.
    • Some states also might require the driver to attend Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) or Narcotics Anonymous (NA) meetings, too.
  • Lengthy prison sentences.
 

ucfgrad93

macrumors P6
Aug 17, 2007
17,540
8,165
Colorado
This is a waste of tax dollars. I suspect they could prevent him from driving for far less than the cost of keeping him in prison for 25 years.
Just for kicks, how could they "prevent him from driving"? He has been convicted 5 times and spent 12 years in jail. Not to mention, I'm sure his license has been suspended/revoked several times as well. So what else could the government do?
 

VulchR

macrumors 68020
Jun 8, 2009
2,329
10,254
Scotland
The problem is not the driving. It's the drinking. We have licences to drive cars - we should have licence to drink (which could be revoked for anti-social behaviour, drunk driving, etc.). Life sounds kinda severe, but then we'd all scream bloody murder if this guy got drunk again and killed somebody.
 

thekev

macrumors 604
Aug 5, 2010
6,670
1,745
Just for kicks, how could they "prevent him from driving"? He has been convicted 5 times and spent 12 years in jail. Not to mention, I'm sure his license has been suspended/revoked several times as well. So what else could the government do?
Don't allow him to even own a car. Arrest anyone who allows them to borrow one and impound their vehicle. They could of course keep him on house arrest with an ankle monitor. The cost of jailing someone is quite high.
 
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BoxerGT2.5

macrumors 68000
Jun 4, 2008
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The problem is not the driving. It's the drinking. We have licences to drive cars - we should have licence to drink (which could be revoked for anti-social behaviour, drunk driving, etc.). Life sounds kinda severe, but then we'd all scream bloody murder if this guy got drunk again and killed somebody.
Is there anything else you'd like the government to regulate us doing?
 

0007776

Suspended
Jul 11, 2006
6,474
8,051
Somewhere
The problem is not the driving. It's the drinking. We have licences to drive cars - we should have licence to drink (which could be revoked for anti-social behaviour, drunk driving, etc.). Life sounds kinda severe, but then we'd all scream bloody murder if this guy got drunk again and killed somebody.
Sounds good to me. Around where I live it seems like almost all crime is alcohol related. Paying attention to it has made me start to think that prohibition wasn't such a bad thing.
 
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LIVEFRMNYC

macrumors 604
Oct 27, 2009
7,433
8,607
Anyone that already has excessive DWI convictions deserves life. He simply can not be trusted and is not safe around the public.

House arrest will do nothing, but get him arrested once more(possibly for murder) when he still gets inside of a car while intoxicated, despite wearing an ankle monitor.

You can't keep guys like this on a leash. You have to lock them up. If he stays sober in prison for at least a decade, then you can talk parole or changing the actual sentence time(which is done frequently).