MBP 16" Compatible Docks with 96W/100W Power

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matram

macrumors 6502
Sep 18, 2011
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Sweden
"Limited Time Deal" for anyone who's interested at $230.44
I get regular kernel panics with the TS3+ connected to my 16” or my 2016 15”. KP happens when MBP is sleeping even with nothing connected to the TS3+.

So the TS3+ sits on a shelf and is only connected when there is a new release to test if the problem is fixed. So far no luck. I would advice against buying the TS3+.
- - Post merged: - -

Yes. When playing Cities Skylines (a Sim City type game), with 2 monitors connected, youtube playing on 1, the game on no.2 and Safari on the 3rd, the battery goes down to about 85% after 3 hours
Seems you are drawing 5W more than your charger can provide. Have you tried iStat menus to check your power draw and the wattage of your charger?
 

tokanizar

macrumors newbie
Jul 21, 2011
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I get regular kernel panics with the TS3+ connected to my 16” or my 2016 15”. KP happens when MBP is sleeping even with nothing connected to the TS3+.

So the TS3+ sits on a shelf and is only connected when there is a new release to test if the problem is fixed. So far no luck. I would advice against buying the TS3+.
I have had 0 kernel panics with or without connecting to the TS3+. I probably got lucky 🤔

EDIT: LOL I just got one plugging in the TS3+ dock. I jinxed myself 😂
 
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bsbeamer

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Sep 19, 2012
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Same here with TS3 Plus - none of those reported kernel panics when using with the TS3 Plus or standalone (without the dock). Also installed the firmware update which upped to 87W PD and some other fixes for MBP16,1 apparently.
 

bsbeamer

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Original poster
Sep 19, 2012
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Only posting this because it claims 100W PD via USB-C, but it's through Kickstarter and basically a "preorder" situation. They've made reliable products in the past and have a track record, so maybe a little better than some startups, but it's still Kickstarter.


Seems like if you get the 18-port with optional power supply, it would be a single cable solution to MBP16,1 for 100W PD, but that is NOT 100% confirmed.

See FAQ:

Does the 6-port, 12-port and 18-port need to be connected to external power to work?
All 3 models (6-port, 12-port, and 18-port) can be bus-powered by the USB-C device (iPad Pro, MacBook, laptop etc.) and do not require external power to work.

They can also be powered by an external USB-C PD power supply. In the case of the 18-port, there is also an option to use an optional DC power supply. Once externally powered, the hubs will provide power delivery pass through charging to the USB-C device.

You advertise 100W charging but the demo only shows 85W. Why? Will that charge the 16” MacBook Pro?
The Hub takes 15W of power, so the rest goes to the MacBook. It will charge a 16” MacBook Pro.

According to comments:

The DC input port on the 18-port supports 20.5V~21V/5.85A~8.57A/120W~180W
We will have 2 optional PSU for the 18-port.
120W: 20.5V/5.85A
180W: 21V/8.57A
We are still waiting for the PSU supplier to come back from Chinese New Year vacation to confirm PSU costs.
 
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danwells

macrumors 6502a
Apr 4, 2015
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The HyperDrive is NOT TB3, but USB-C... That means that all the display ports are mirrored unless you use an unstable MST driver... It's only 10Gbps TOTAL, so one fast drive (NVMe) can eat all the bandwidth, and even without any ridiculously fast peripherals, a lot of combinations will run out of bandwidth.

Display + any ol' SSD + Ethernet will challenge the upstream bandwidth (using only 3 common ports).

You need the 18 port model to get the DC in, and among those 18 ports, you'll find:

2 things that generally don't get counted as ports (the DC power-in port and a phone charging port with NO DATA TRANSFER).

The input port

2 USB 2.0 ports uniquely suited to the computing needs of the past

No less than four video ports that all have to mirror each other

Two digital audio ports (presumably mirrored, but I'm not 100% sure), one of which is a very weird standard that mostly went out years ago (Coax is useful, Toslink is rare - I haven't seen anything in YEARS that has Toslink but not coax).

MicroSD and SD card readers counted separately (to be fair, this one is relatively common). Personally, I'd count card readers separately for sure if they are unrelated standards like SD/CF, SD/XQD or SD/CFast. On a product aimed at high-volume photographers (which this is not), one could argue that two independent SD readers count separately, but they'd both have to be capable of taking full-size camera SD cards. Micro SD doesn't count separately on anything that already has SD, because adapters are cheap and common, and Micro SD cards tend to get stuck in a device once and left there.


If I were really counting the ports fairly on the 18-port, I get 8 (discounting the input port, the power adapter, the phone charger and the USB 2.0 ports completely, and counting the four mirrored video ports as one, the two audio ports as one, and the two card readers as one). Another port is not quite fair - the headphone jack, because Macs all have one.

The 18-port model actually has:
Three USB 3.0 (two type A plus one type C)
One video port (with a nice choice of connectors)
Gigabit Ethernet
Digital Audio
Card reader
Headphone jack

Not bad for a USB-C hub, but nowhere near what a real TB3 dock can do...
 

VArase

macrumors newbie
Feb 1, 2008
7
0
Chicagoland
Has anyone found a reputable docking solution that can deliver 96 watts or 100 watts of power for use with the new 16" MBP?

AUKEY CB-C71 (AKA: Unity Link PD III 8-in-1 USB-C Hub with 100W PD)
Warning: Only provides 60W, despite advertising 100W passthrough
There is (as stated on the Amazon page) a firmware update available from Aukey to address the 60W problem, though I've lacked the courage (and gumption) to put it on.

1. All materials are in Chinese
2. It's a Windows updater

That said, even if it cures the 60w problem, since it's a pass-through solution I would expect it to provide (with the Apple supplied charger) a maximum of 96w - 13w or around 83w of power since the Aukey probably absorbs about 13w of power itself for its own functionality.

Even with their new Omnia Gallium nitride chargers (supplying up to 100w expected to be released in Q2 2020) I would therefore only expect 100w - 13w or 87w of pass-through charging.

... and even then, I don't know if you can really count on that Q2 2020 release; I think Aukey is in Shenzhen - at least their open positions advertise as such - and COVID-19 is burning through China with something like 760 million in quarantine lockdown, and though Shenzhen doesn't have it's own infection pool (according the John Hopkin's website) Guangdong does and I believe Shenzhen is on lockdown now and Lord knows when that whole mess will end.
 

VArase

macrumors newbie
Feb 1, 2008
7
0
Chicagoland
Has anyone found a reputable docking solution that can deliver 96 watts or 100 watts of power for use with the new 16" MBP?

Making this first post a Wiki so it can be updated with links in the future.

----

AUKEY CB-C71 (AKA: Unity Link PD III 8-in-1 USB-C Hub with 100W PD)
Warning: Only provides 60W, despite advertising 100W passthrough
I never put on the Aukey firmware due to lack of a Windows system - and the firmware updater was a windows updater - but requested a Mac version with english documentation (the docs in the zip file were a Chinese powerpoint document).

Aukey just sent me a replacement CB-C71 and it now claims (according to iStat Menus) to be a 94w charger.

Of course, you're not going to get 94w of pass-through charging because the CB-C71 will steal some juice for itself, but if you've got a CB-C71 and a 16 inch MacBook Pro, you may want to contact Aukey.

Keep in mind they appear to be in Shenzhen so things are a bit dicey there, so try to demonstrate some patience.
 

mdg1

macrumors newbie
Feb 21, 2020
1
0
The computer pulls a consistent 92-97 watts after it fully heats up. This seems to be a hard limit imposed by the OS - either heat related or power related. It is the same limit with the Dell dock or with the Apple supplied charger in my testing (I tested the power limits previously with the Apple charger, posted on some thread somewhere on this site).

When the GPU is active, at ~20w, the CPU is allocated 45w. It runs around 2.9ghz. When I turn off the external display the CPU is allocated an additional 18-22w and runs at 3.3-3.4ghz. This behavior is consistent using the Dell dock and the Apple supplied charger. It’s either a pre-determined cooling limit or a power limit, either way Apple is limiting the power draw to 92-97 watts, regardless of charger connected in my testing. Pushing the GPU to 30watts (all I could get it up to) pulled another 7-8w away from the CPU forcing it to run around 38 watts and 2.4-2.5ghz.

During the hour long handbrake transcode and playing around with the GPU the system never pulled below 88 watts and never above 97 watts after the initial spike and settle. The first 2 seconds used 140 watts, the following 5 used 120 watts, the following 3 minutes used about 105 watts and then it settled into 92-97 watts. The battery percent, as reported by the OS (so for whatever that’s worth) never dropped from 100% in my hour long test. People who run at full load 24/7, while I think they should have a desktop, may or may not run into problems.

All in all the behavior is consistent with my previous MBP (2016) and my previous Razer blade 15” (8750h, 2070mq). Though razer *never* lets their CPU pull more than 45 watts in high power mode, limited to 35 watts in normal mode.

I’m very pleased with the Dell dock at this point. DP 1.4, full speed downstream thunderbolt port, and 90 watts of power which is sufficient for my needs. If you know you’re going to be running full load 24/7 I’d probably recommend waiting for the 100watt pluggable Titan Ridge dock that was just announced so you don’t have to worry about it.
thanks for the great report.
Tracking after this subject from the beginning - I got to the conclusion that the Dell WD19TB and the HP Thunderbolt Dock G2 are both suitable to charge the MBC 16". Still, the Dell WD19TB is the safer choice as it has been tested with more scenarios.
My only question is there only one model for WD19TB? I saw somewhere that Dell released this model with 2 power options: 180W and 240W
Will be great if you specify the link to the product you use.
 

rex450se

macrumors regular
Apr 9, 2011
245
60
Independence, MO
thanks for the great report.
Tracking after this subject from the beginning - I got to the conclusion that the Dell WD19TB and the HP Thunderbolt Dock G2 are both suitable to charge the MBC 16". Still, the Dell WD19TB is the safer choice as it has been tested with more scenarios.
My only question is there only one model for WD19TB? I saw somewhere that Dell released this model with 2 power options: 180W and 240W
Will be great if you specify the link to the product you use.
There's a few WD19's but only one WD19TB. And that's the one you want. If you're interested in one, I have an extra one for sale as I switched my home dock to the CalDigit one since I wanted the SDCard reader without another add on. Otherwise they are on sale right now from Dell for $260, about $70 off.
 
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