MBP Average Temp is about 57°-62°C or 136°-144°F?

Discussion in 'MacBook Pro' started by koesherbacon, Nov 22, 2013.

  1. koesherbacon macrumors member

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    Jun 5, 2009
    #1
    My Macbook Pro, 13", Mid 2009, is averaging between 57-62°C or 136-144°F. Is this acceptable, or should I take her to the doctor to see why she's running a fever? I recently updated to Mavericks and the computer seems to hotter after the update.

    I'm already running iStats Menus and have the fan turned all the way up to 44XXrpm, but it still feels a little warmer than usual to me.

    I'm a worrier, so if this is nothing to worry about, I'll appreciate hearing it from you all. If there is a problem, I'd like to know now so I can get it sorted out.

    Thanks a bunch!
     
  2. themumu macrumors 6502a

    themumu

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    #2
    I don't think it's particularly worrisome, at this point, but it could grow.

    Your computer is 4 years old, and while it's not a problem in itself, it may be that you have too much debris inside that are clogging up fans and reducing the cooling ability. Dust, pet hair can accumulate and do this. Might want to open it up and use one of those dust-off compressed air cans on any exposed parts.
     
  3. koesherbacon thread starter macrumors member

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    #3
    Oh that's a good idea. Is there a particular brand that you'd suggest? Particularly one that I could get on Amazon?
     
  4. themumu macrumors 6502a

    themumu

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    #4
    It doesn't matter, whichever is cheapest. I just get whatever a nearby shop carries, it's just compressed air. Not everyone is susceptible to this issue, but personally, I have 2 cats and the inside of my older equipment shows it ;)
     
  5. jondunford macrumors 6502

    jondunford

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    #5
    i sometimes make my macbook work hard so it gets hot and i can melt chocolate on it
     
  6. koesherbacon thread starter macrumors member

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    #6
    I have caught one of our cats sleeping on the keyboard when the screen is not closed... She's a long-haired persian, so there probably is quite a bit of scmutz inside. I'll try your solution and let you know how that worked.
     
  7. mac82 macrumors member

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    Jan 17, 2011
    #7
    Try doing an SMC reset. I had the same problem with a 2010 MacBook Air that had always been very cool on Snow Leopard, Lion and Mountain Lion. Installed Mavericks and it just ran hotter. Reset the SMC and its temps are back to normal. Give it a go.
     
  8. Doward macrumors 6502a

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    #8
    As long as under heavy load you don't exceed 95C, you are fine :)
     
  9. red321red321 macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #9
    I'm at 100 C + right now lol, Parallels really uses the CPU.
     

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  10. cbautis2 macrumors 6502a

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    #10
    I don't worry about CPU temps anymore unless you experience severe throttling or sudden thermal shutdown. Even at temps above 110 degrees, CPU is still fine and still way below the thermal cutoff temperature.
     
  11. Doward macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 21, 2013
    #11
    [Takei]Oh, my![/Takei]

    Yeah, no. 105C is the absolute maximum temperature Intel allows for their processors. 110C is is no way 'fine'.

    By Apple's fan profile, Apple is happy to let your CPU run up to 90-95C. This is only 10C below Intel's maximum spec.

    If your cpu exceeds 95C - your computer is an unhappy computer. You have blockage, dirty fans, incorrectly applied thermal paste, or got a particularly poorly machined heatsink.

    Please, take the time to do some research and learn:
    Yes, your Macbook Pro is running too hot @ 100C+!
     
  12. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    May 16, 2008
    #12
    Those temps are quite normal, and not a cause for any concern.

    The Intel processors used in Macs are designed to automatically shut down to prevent damage if they truly overheat. CPU Tjmax = 105C (221F), GPU Tjmax = 100C (212F) on i3, i5, i7 processors. (Source: Intel)
    Unless there is a rare defect in a Mac, most temps are well within the normal operating range, considering the workload being put on it. Websites with Flash content, games and other multimedia apps will put higher demand on the CPU/GPU, generating more heat. This is normal. If you're constantly putting high demands on your system, such as gaming or other multimedia tasks, expect temps to rise and fans to spin up accordingly. It's just your Mac doing its job to maintain temps within the normal range.
    It is also quite normal for your Mac to become extremely hot to the touch during intensive operations. The aluminum body transfers heat more effectively than other materials used in computer casings, so you will feel the heat more. This doesn't indicate that it's overheating and will not harm the computer to be hot to the touch.
    Your fans are always on when your Mac is on, spinning at a minimum of 2000 rpm (for MBPs) or 1800 rpm (for MBAs, MBs and minis), or 1200 for the newest MBAs. Older iMacs have 3 fans with minimum speeds in the 800-1200 range, while the newest iMacs have a single fan, spinning at a minimum of about 1400 rpm. They will spin faster as needed to keep temps at a safe level. If your fans are spinning up without increased heat, try resetting the SMC. (PRAM/NVRAM has nothing to do with these issues, so resetting it will not help.)
    The intake and exhaust vents are in the back of the computer near the hinge on all Mac notebooks (except the new MBP with retina display, which has intake vents along the sides at the bottom). The iMac vent is a slot on the back near the top of the computer. Make sure the vents remain unblocked to allow your computer to perform at its best. For Flash-related issues:
     
  13. red321red321 macrumors regular

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    Jun 3, 2013
    #13
    Thing is, my Mac is almost new. Apple replaced my early 2013 a few months ago with a totally new 2013. I complained that the new one I got runs hotter than the old one, but they wouldn't help me with it.
     
  14. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #14
    May I ask why you're still posting this inaccuracy about the vents in Mac laptops? The non-unibody Macbooks have a secondary nearly equal intake via the keyboard and the 12" Powerbook has an air intake along the side.
     
  15. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #15
    There has never been any air intake or exhaust vents through the keyboard on any Mac notebook. For all Mac notebooks except the MBP-Retina, both intake and exhaust has always been through the vents in the rear near the hinge. The new MBP-Retina has intake vents along the sides at the bottom and exhaust through the rear vents, near the hinge.

    This arrangement allows for venting with the lid open or closed (for operating in clamshell mode). There is a solid panel under the keyboard, preventing any meaningful airflow.
    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
  16. Doward macrumors 6502a

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    Feb 21, 2013
    #16
    Show them the system running 100C+ and they should handle it for you.
     
  17. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #17
    The poster with that issue has already resolved it in another thread. It was a software issue with Parallels, not hardware.
     
  18. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #18
    Then why does the Macbook1,1-4,1 have strategically placed holes within parts of its keyboard tray that have changed throughout the model's lifespan. Why is it able to create a strong enough vacuum to keep a standard piece of paper held to the keyboard when vertical and the fan at maximum. Why does coloured smoke when blown only across the keyboard come out the rear vent. Why does the idle temperature increase when a keyboard cover is used. Why does the GMA950/X3100 throttle down when in clamshell mode. Why is it that when the non-exhaust part of the rear vent is covered the temperatures stay the same. Why does Apple state to not put anything on a Macbook's keyboard for risk of overheating.

    Making such a sweeping statement about all Mac laptops is rather silly and incorrect. The aluminum G4 Powerbooks all have an intake vent along their side. On the 12" Powerbook, the side vent is its only intake vent. The first revision titanium Powerbook had a vent at the bottom and all titanium Powerbooks have a side vent and their primary intake. Some of the G3 Powerbooks had vents along their sides as well. As did the G3 (non-clameshell) and G4 iBooks. Some of the older pre-G3 laptops may have had vents on their sides and even bottoms as well. Then you're overlooking all the Mac laptops that don't even have vents on them at all, like the Powerbook 100 series.
     
  19. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #19
    The holes that have appeared in some models are not vents. They serve other purposes, either in the manufacuring or assembly process, but they are not vents. As for vacuum and smoke, the suction created by the fans will also draw air through any hole, including ports, even though such openings are not designed or intended as vents. Covering the keyboard inhibits dissipation to a small degree, but not venting. Apple does not state to not put anything on the keyboard for risk of overheating.

    The Powerbooks are not part of the MacBook line, which my post and this thread refers to. That's why I said "Mac notebook" and not "Apple notebook".
     
  20. angelus01 macrumors newbie

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    #20
    2012 late 15inch retina - 92c
     

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  21. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #21
    The holes in the keyboard's have been designed to maximize airflow across the upper part of the logicboard. In the 2,1+ models, Apple added in a plastic insert to cover some of the hole directly over the fan showing that Apple was actively redesigning the keyboard vent to better cool the rest of the logicboard instead of just the heatsink. When looking at the rear vent, the logicboard is almost equal to the top of the rear vent limiting its airflow to the upper part of the logicboard. The rear vent's primary intake serves mostly the underside of the logicboard. The upperside is served primarily by the keyboard vent. The fan's only intake opening is facing up, to the keyboard vent. The smoke extruding tube when placed near other openings like the ports on the side do not draw in any smoke at all. When moved to the rear vent, there is an equal intake to that of the keyboard vent.

    The keyboard tray holes serve no purpose in the production of the topcase. There's no need to have such large holes in the bottom of the keyboard try to insert the keyboard membrane or keys. No logicboard part would be added through the holes. If they did pose some part in the production of the machine, they'd be evenly distributed across it and not located right over the fan and logicboard. If Apple's goal was to reduce weight by means of cutting out holes, they'd have made holes throughout the keyboard tray. But they didn't make any over the lower left and the optical drive. The statement about using a keyboard skin and how it can lead to overheating is within the service manual for the CoreSolo Macbooks. Under troubleshooting there is a line in the overheating section about checking for a keyboard skin and to remove if present. The user manual also states that nothing should be placed on the keyboard when it is operating. All of this still fails to explain why the machine shows noticeably higher temperatures when a keyboard skin is used. That is why the GMA 950 downclocks itself to 250Mhz, from the normal 400Mhz, when the machine is in clamshell mode.

    Your wording of Mac notebooks has been used in other threads of both architectures, not just this one. The choice of wording is rather poorly chosen as every laptop Apple ever made was a Mac notebook. Being that they can all run Mac OS or Mac OS X. A better phrasing maybe ever Intell based Mac notebook with the following exceptions of the non-unibody Macbook and retina line.

    Your one previous quote about Mac comptuters have vents for air to exit at the back fails to mention vents for air to enter. Vents on the back of the Mac Pro allow air to enter? That isn't how they're designed. That little quote doesn't do anything in the way of how the air gets into the Mac.
     
  22. red321red321 macrumors regular

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    #22
    Bottom line is, GGJstudios genuinely tries to provide useful advice to folks on the forum on temp related problems with their laptops. Because of his help my fans no longer scream when Parallels is being used. Who cares if he is right or wrong on some tiny miscellaneous thing?
     
  23. GGJstudios macrumors Westmere

    GGJstudios

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    #23
    Both intake and exhaust vents are in the rear. Nowhere does Apple refer to "keyboard vents" or "vents in the keyboard" of any MacBook model. If people want to believe that incindental air coming in through the keyboard or USB port or charging port makes those openings vents, that's their choice. There are no keyboard vents in any of the MacBook line. Common sense would suggest that if the keyboard was intended as a primary intake vent, Apple would never give instructions or the capability for operating in Clamshell mode, and they wouldn't sell keyboard covers. People can believe what they want. I stand by my statements until proven otherwise by statements from Apple.
     
  24. Intell macrumors P6

    Intell

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    #24
    Yes there are intake vents in the rear. The air amount taken in by the rear vent is nearly equal to the amount taken in by the keyboard vent. Making such a steadfast statement of no vents in the keyboard tray when there are clearly purpose made and designed holes is rather ignorant and narrow minded. When looking at a closed Macbook, one will see that the screen does not fully close off the keyboard area allowing air to move between the screen and topcase. Utilizing logic, Apple has designed the Macbook line so that either of the air intake vents could be used if one was completely blocked or obstructed. This has been tested by blocking the rear intake or the keyboard intake and still maintaining operable, yet higher, temperatures. Apple does limit the device's heat output when in clamshell mode by lowering the GPU clock speed showing that Apple is aware of the limitations of its design. Also of note, this downclocking of the GPU when in clamshell mode is unique to the non-unibody Macbook line among Intell based Mac laptops.

    That still doesn't have anything to do with your quote from Apple making no mention of an air intake vent. Going by your quote alone or even reading Apple's page about fans and vents where that quote comes from, one could come to the fictitious conclusion that air is drawn in only through the optical drive slot because of how it fails to specify an ingress for cooling air. You're using that statement to account for both in and out directions of the air, when it only ever contains output. Even though Apple's own user manuals often say to not use such things as a keyboard cover or a iPhone screen protector, they are sold in their stores because people buy them. Until Apple makes a statement about the air intake vents on a Macbook, I will continue to put forth my motion as being correct as shown by logic, facts, and the argument put forth.
     
  25. Doward macrumors 6502a

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    #25
    Lookin' good! :cool:
     

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