Mental health - the last thing it is OK to discriminate over

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by Cromulent, Jul 10, 2014.

  1. Cromulent, Jul 10, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2014

    Cromulent macrumors 603

    Cromulent

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2006
    Location:
    The Land of Hope and Glory
    #1
    Discrimination is no longer socially acceptably for a wide range of issues:
    • Race
    • Sexuality
    • Gender
    • Religious belief
    • Age
    • Political belief
    but one area still seems to be discriminated against on a regular basis and that is mental health. If you tell a person you are disabled and you are missing a leg or something no one batters an eye lid. Tell someone you are disabled and you are fully able bodied and don't have any mental retardation they immediately think you are trying to take money off the state.

    I ask you this. Do you really think that mental health issues are less debilitating than any other disability? If so what do you base your opinion on? Why do you feel the way you do? Do you even know anything about mental health issues or are you just going off "gut instinct"?
     
  2. Southern Dad macrumors 65816

    Southern Dad

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    Georgia
    #2
    Mental Health is a medical issue. What kind of discrimination are you talking about? Employment? Housing? Or just general disdain?
     
  3. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #3
    I appreciate the topic as it's my career of choice, but I think you need to be a little more specific for this to be a productive conversation. "Mental health issues" is a very generic term as it emcompasses a wide variety of conditions.

    It would appear you want to discuss mental health challenges that are severe enough in nature to qualify as a disability. There is a process by which individuals can apply for disability benefits and when it comes to mental health there are specific criteria that must be met in terms of intensity, frequency, and duration of symptoms in order for that condition to qualify a person for disability.

    So, that being said, I'm not sure I understand what question you are asking or point you are making. I don't think anyone thinks it's okay to discriminate against individuals who have mental health struggles. However, not all mental health struggles qualify as debilitating and therefore deserving of disability status. That's why we have a system of assessment and determination.

    From your tone it sounds as if this could be a personal issue for you or someone you know and that you are frustrated by it. If you want to vent or need some feedback then great, but we'll need more information regarding what specifically is bothering you.
     
  4. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #4
    I would say the main reason is that people with mental health issues are mostly forced to take drugs as those issues that can be helped by therapy are given short shrift by the insurance industry as therapeutic counseling is too expensive. Mental health drugs have a lot of side effects and I believe that the side effects make it more difficult for the mentally ill to feel good about themselves.
     
  5. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #5
    Are you suggesting that one of the physiological side effects of psychotropic meds are low self esteem?

    I don't understand the highlighted line.

    I think you might find that in many disorders a combination of meds and a properly selected psychotherapy is more effective than either alone.
     
  6. Ugg macrumors 68000

    Ugg

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2003
    Location:
    Penryn
    #6
    Yes, I believe that the two together are much more effective than one or the other. But, I firmly believe that us insurance doesn't want to pay for holistic treatment and forces most people onto drugs that often have significant side effects that make it more difficult to remain on the meds, especially without counseling.
     
  7. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2011
    Location:
    New England, USA
    #7
    I don't know about where you live, but in Mass adult patient's can't be forced to take meds if they refuse them. Even those adjudicated incompetent to make their own health care decisions, and with their Health Care Proxy activated, cannot have meds forced upon them.
     
  8. mscriv macrumors 601

    mscriv

    Joined:
    Aug 14, 2008
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    #8
    I am a therapist who works for an insurance company. I think you are overstating things quite a bit. Most insurance companies I know cover therapeutic services and counseling for a variety of diagnoses and conditions. Relationship counseling on the other hand is a different story.
     

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