Metric System is a New World Order Plot?

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by realtuner, Jun 9, 2019.

  1. realtuner macrumors 6502a

    realtuner

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    #1
    I’m absolutely amazed at the stupidity of Tucker Carlson and whoever that idiot is he’s talking to is.

     
  2. jerwin macrumors 68020

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  3. quagmire macrumors 603

    quagmire

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    #3
    Someone tell him NASA used the metric system when we went to the moon.... And uses the metric system today.
     
  4. blackfox Suspended

    blackfox

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    #4
    I've lived in the US for almost 30 years (from UK originally) - and I still don't understand the Standard system of measurement here. It is ridiculous. I guess the US is indeed "exceptional" - but understand the definition... I don't believe tyranny is measured in base 10.
     
  5. LordVic macrumors 603

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    #5
    I honestly thought this was a photoshop headline at first... till I Heard this morning the audio clip on the radio.

    What a bunch of morons. Plain and simple, this is one of the stupidest things I think I have ever heard on Fox news... and that's saying something considering the rest of their lies and nonsense they peddle

    I'm honestly expecting tomorrows headlines to be "Flat Earthers: Revolutions thinkers?"
     
  6. chown33 Moderator

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    #6
    Bring back the cubit.

    And just to be clear, I mean all of them. And more.

    Everyone should get to use their own cubit.
     
  7. yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #7
    Not really.
    The Von Braun notes contain several references to the imperial system (one example is the Greissler note from 7/21/1969: "As you pointed out the real problem for aviation is the generation of the trailing vortex 9Y very head aircraft-in the 700,000 lb. gross weight class (C-5A and 747) during -take off and landing", or the Downey notes from the same date: "'After, the initial check out and evaluation, the craft has been moving at speeds varying between. 5 and 5 knots and at depths of 650 feet and 1650 feet."
    Also many other documents used the imperial system. For example, the Saturn V Flight Manual, page 1-6 which described the vehicle at a high level is all in imperial system. Another example from the same manual is the expected performance description: "The predicted thrust profile for the S-IC stage (figure 2-25) R shows the thrust increase from approximately 7,693,000 I pounds at one second after first motion to approximately 9.042,000 pounds at center engine cutoff, where the vehicle has attained an altitude of approximately 144.000 feet. At center engine cutoff vehicle thrust drops to approximately 7,120,000 pounds."
     
  8. realtuner thread starter macrumors 6502a

    realtuner

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    #8
    NASA used a mix of both. The flight computer (for example) used Metric internally but accepted and displayed Imperial since that’s what the astronauts preferred.

    That said, I think the point @quagmire was trying to make is the scientific community is almost exclusively Metric. Even in the US.

    Which might explain why those idiots at Fox are against it - because it’s used by scientists.
     
  9. jerwin macrumors 68020

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  10. yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #10
  11. jerwin, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019

    jerwin macrumors 68020

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    #11
  12. yaxomoxay, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019

    yaxomoxay macrumors 68040

    yaxomoxay

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    #12
    Ultimately back then NASA spoke Imperial, as the rest of the North American aviation still to this day for some of its measures (altitude, speed etc.). Obviously those scientists knew very well how the decimal system worked, but that doesn't mean that it was the system that was used to bring the Eagle on the Moon.
    --- Post Merged, Jun 10, 2019 ---
    Fantastic document! :)
    --- Post Merged, Jun 10, 2019 ---
    From the Apollo Guidance Computer system description:

    DSKY input processing. A group of routines under the formal name, “Pinball Game - Buttons and Lights'' (more informally simply called “Pinball'') handle entering data, interpreting the Verb and Noun codes and dispatching commands. Such a whimsical name is actually quite appropriate, as Pinball dedicates much of its code to data punched into the keyboard and managing the lights and digit displays. Although the movement of data from the output buffer to the DSKY display is driven by the T4RUPT interrupt processing, all the display contents are managed by Pinball routines. Input through the DSKY begins when an astronaut presses a key on the panel, raising the KEYRUPT1 keyboard interrupt. The keycode, identifying the key just pressed, is placed in the lower five bits of input channel 13. The interrupt routine runs quickly to schedule the Pinball routine CHARIN to process the data. CHARIN categorizes the keystroke as a Verb or Noun, a digit, or any of the other operation keys, and determines what processing must take place. Pressing the Verb key, for example, sets flags indicating that the subsequent characters must be interpreted as a Verb code, and sets bits in the display output buffer, DSPTAB, to flash the Verb and Noun fields. Essential sanity checking on the input is performed first. Invalid keystrokes, such as pressing a non-digit key when numeric data is expected, will terminate CHARIN and illuminate the OPR ERR light. As numeric data is punched into the DSKY, it is first displayed in the leftmost digit of the Verb, Noun or register, and each new digit appears successively to the right. This is different from the familiar case where each keystroke shifts the existing display left, with the new digit inserted in the rightmost position. Only after pressing the Enter key does the interpretation of the data begin.

    Extended Verbs (numbered 40 through 99) are quickly dispatched by transferring control to the appropriate routine. A new job is not scheduled for performing extended Verbs, rather the Verb is processed as part of the CHARIN routine. Often an extended Verb requests additional data, as in the case of Verb 48 (Load Digital Autopilot Parameters), which presents several Verb-Noun combinations to the astronaut, requesting information on the spacecraft configuration and desired autopilot characteristics. After collecting the necessary data, Verb 48 schedules the Digital Autopilot tasks and terminates itself. Other extended Verbs can proceed
    without additional data, and set flags or schedule other work before ending. As extended Verbs execute as part of the CHARIN routine, only one extended Verb can execute at a time. In the event that a crewmember tries to execute a second Extended Verb before the first one has finished, the OPR ERR light illuminates and prevents a second extended Verb from executing concurrently.

    Regular Verbs (when combined with Nouns) display, monitor or load data in a wide variety of formats. Regardless of the operation requested, an elaborate set of tables and routines convert the data entered into a format usable by the software routines. As seen in the hardware description section, most data is stored using a fractional notation. Additionally, the units employed internally in the AGC are exclusively metric, yet human factors demand that the crew uses English units. These requirements, plus the different numbers of components for the Nouns, result in a complex design for referencing the appropriate scaling and conversion routines.

    As an example of data loading, we will use the case of the three components of Command Module Noun 89, 11 which specifies the location of a lunar surface landmark. Noun 89 is a mixed Noun, whose data components use the following format:

    Landmark Latitude: XX.XXX Degrees
    Landmark Longitude/2: XX.XXX Degrees
    Landmark Altitude: XXX.XX Nautical miles.

    Each component of the Noun uses a different input format and scaling. Here, latitude is saved as a double precision value, as is the Longitude/2. Longitude normally is expressed as a range 0 to +180 degrees, but, as its name implies, Longitude/2 is scaled so that the data entered is less than + 90 degrees. Landmark altitude, expressed as the distance from the center of the Moon, is also double precision, but scaled quite differently than the other two components. Parsing each Noun and its individual components requires a complex assemblage of tables and routines. The two types of Nouns, ordinary and mixed, require that those tables alternate between two different formats, further increasing complexity. Ordinary Nouns are numbered 01 to 40, use direct memory references to the data, and the values are all of the same data type (angles, velocity or octal). Mixed Nouns, those which are numbered above 40, are much more complex. Each component can be a different datatype from the others, and referencing the data for the display requires an extra step called indirection. Ordinary Nouns are defined by referencing data located in contiguous storage, and use the same scaling and conversion resources for each component. They require only two data structures to reference the data and routines to manipulate the DSKY data. Mixed Nouns present a completely different situation, as their numerous variants require no fewer than eight tables for processing the data.
     
  13. ThisBougieLife macrumors 68000

    ThisBougieLife

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    #13
    The metric system is the tool of the devil! My car gets 40 rods to the hogshead and that's the way I likes it!
     
  14. jerwin, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019

    jerwin macrumors 68020

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    #14
    you may be interested ion the NASA technical Reports Server. It doesn't have everything...

    https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp

    Another of my grandfather's papers, from 1967

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF POLYBENZIMIDAZOLE COMPOSITES AS ABLATIVE HEAT SHIELDS

    Note that metric units are used throughout.

    But in this particular instance, NASA wasn't writing for the aircraft industry.
    (Do note that JFK's charge to NASA was "First, I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely to the earth.") Heat shields were a part of that process, though AVCOAT was a Phenolic-Phenolic meterial, not a polybenzimidazole. (see this reference)
     
  15. Raid, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019

    Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #15
  16. cube macrumors P6

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    #16
    I was thinking speed, acceleration are not really metric.

    So instead of 24 hours one could have 100 blocks of about 15 minutes each.

    Then divide each one by 10.

    So Swatch Internet Time got it right.
     
  17. jerwin macrumors 68020

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    #17
    When I was in high and college, the physics classes used "meters per second" for speed and "meters per second per second" for acceleration. This was in the early nineties. (slightly before Swatch Internet Time)

    Where do these curmudgeons come from? They sound proud to be old, proud never to have taken a physics class, or proud to be idiots.
     
  18. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #18
    Speed and acceleration in m/s km/s are as metric as yards/s miles/s are imperial...as they all use the same denominator... But to get a 100 daily blocks that would be 14mins and 24 seconds.. But that's too short for major time units. But if you break up a day into 10 sections that's 144 minutes per "metric hour" and 14mins 24 seconds for a "metric deci-hour" and a metric minute is 86.4seconds. :D
     
  19. cube, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019

    cube macrumors P6

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    #19
    But a metric minute would be 100 metric seconds.

    A standard blockbuster could be one metric hour long. :)
     
  20. Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #20
    depends on which end of the scale you are using... but if one was to divide time up in base 10 metrics they'd probably use a system like a metric second is the time it takes light in a vacuum to travel 1B meters... which is about 3.3 seconds
     
  21. cube macrumors P6

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    #21
    But the point is that for it to be practical, you want to fit metric in one day.

    Longer timescales would keep being non-metric.
     
  22. Raid, Jun 10, 2019
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019

    Raid macrumors 68020

    Raid

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    #22
    The universe cares not how long our day is, for other metric systems like Celsius, the universe doesn't care about when water freezes at "standard temperature and pressure" that's why technically an absolute scale like Kelvin is more metric than Celsius. And why measures like 1kg of water at maximum density (4 Celsius) is really close (but not perfectly due to technical limitations at the time and subsequent changes to definitions). It does make more sense than not.

    <edit> Damnit for got to add that my calc of 86.4seconds as a metric minute only differs by base 10; I just went to 1,000 metric seconds in a day.
     
  23. cube macrumors P6

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    #23
    A stardate makes sense for science, but not for the average person on Earth.
     
  24. Eraserhead macrumors G4

    Eraserhead

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    #24
    The French did try metric time. It didn’t catch on.
     
  25. cube macrumors P6

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    #25
    Before electronics.
     

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