Misplaced a couple of guns!

Discussion in 'Politics, Religion, Social Issues' started by lostngone, Aug 1, 2014.

  1. lostngone, Aug 1, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2014

    lostngone macrumors demi-god

    lostngone

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    #1
    If I came to this forum and said I personally lost 2 or 3 of my firearms and I think they might be in the hands or criminals or worse, children I would get flamed off the forum!

    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2014/jul/27/pentagon-running-out-of-time-to-find-mass-of-missi/

    "Over the past decade, the Pentagon has provided what the report describes as more than 747,000 weapons and auxiliary equipment to the Afghan National Security Forces at a cost of $626 million. Small arms, such as rifles, pistols, machine guns, grenade launchers and shotguns, account for the majority of those weapons.
    Of the 474,823 serial numbers recorded in the oversight database, 203,888 of those numbers — or about 43 percent — had missing or duplicate information, according to data collected by auditors."


    Remember this is from the same government that was handing out guns to the Mexican drug cartels and doesn't think its own citizens should own the same types of firearms it is giving to possible terrorists in a war zone.
     
  2. samiwas macrumors 65816

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    #2
    They shouldn't be giving guns to anyone, much less overseas enemies.
     
  3. Shrink macrumors G3

    Shrink

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    #3
    If your point is that on many occasions our government is totally FUBAR...I don't think that comes as a shock to many folks.

    If you are suggesting that you would be criticized for losing two handguns and having them end up in criminal hands...that would be totally appropriate.
     
  4. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #4

    Whats a few thousand guns, when you can misplace an Atomic Bomb.

    On Feb. 5, 1958, a B-47 bomber dropped a 7,000-pound nuclear bomb into the waters off Tybee Island, Ga., after it collided with another Air Force jet.

    Fifty years later, the bomb — which has unknown quantities of radioactive material — has never been found. And while the Air Force says the bomb, if left undisturbed, poses no threat to the area, determined bomb hunters and area residents aren't so sure.

    The bomb found its hidden resting place when the B-47 pilot, Air Force Col. Howard Richardson, dropped it into the water after an F-86 fighter jet accidentally collided with him during a training mission. The fighter jet's pilot, Lt. Clarence Stewart, didn't see Richardson's plane on his radar; Stewart descended directly onto Richardson's aircraft. The impact ripped the left wing off the F-86 and heavily damaged the fuel tanks of the B-47.

    Richardson, carrying a two-man crew, was afraid the bomb would break loose from his damaged plane when he landed, so he ditched the bomb in the water before landing the plane at Hunter Air Force Base outside Savannah. Stewart ejected and eventually landed safely in a swamp.

    The Navy searched for the bomb for more than two months, but never found it, and today recommends it should remain in its resting place. In a 2001 report on the search and recovery of the bomb, the Air Force said that if the bomb is still intact, the risk associated with the spread of heavy metals is low. If it’s left undisturbed, the explosive in the bomb poses no hazard, the report said. It went on to say that an "intact explosive would pose a serious explosion hazard to personnel and the environment if disturbed by a recovery attempt."

    While the government has officially stopped searching for the bomb, area residents — including retired Air Force pilot Derek Duke — haven't forgotten about the deadly weapon lying quietly off their coast. In 2004, Duke detected high radiation in shallow water off the coast of Savannah. Government officials investigated, but concluded that the radiation readings were normal for the naturally occurring minerals in the area.

    Liane Hansen spoke with defense correspondent Guy Raz about the history of the lost bomb, and the people who are still intrigued by the sunken weapon.

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18587608
     
  5. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #5
    Ha, the Obama administration has no problem arming al-Queda or cartels
     
  6. EvilQueen macrumors 6502

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    #6
    Although that's an interesting story and I have watched several TV shows about it, what does it have to do with the original post?:confused:
     
  7. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #7
    That the US government is not good at looking after any sort of weapons.:p
     
  8. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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  9. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #9
    http://www.latimes.com/nation/atf-fast-furious-sg-storygallery.html

     
  10. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #10
  11. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #11
    guessing border Patrol Agent Brian Terry faked his death?
     
  12. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #12
    No, the fake part of the scandal is that they just "handed over guns to criminals". :\
     
  13. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #13
    100's of guns lost & tied to crime here in the U.S., dead agent & that is no scandal to you?
     
  14. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #14
    If there is a scandal, it's how weak laws ensured that the ATF couldn't track down firearms. This, of course, is combined with states not wanting to actually help with said investigation. I would find that t be quite a scandal, especially considering how it was a right-wing government (state side) that ensured that the laws were weak and then it was pounced on by more right-wing people to try to frame an argument that doesn't exist.
     
  15. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #15
    HOW do you track something being handed to cartels that cross the border? E.H should be in jail for arms trafficking
     
  16. Technarchy macrumors 604

    Technarchy

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    #16
    Brian Terry's family knows all about the governments "misplaced" guns.

    Too bad it got him killed on the border.

    [​IMG]
     
  17. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #17
    *sigh*

    I have this feeling that the discussion is going to go nowhere. :\
     
  18. Happybunny macrumors 68000

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    #18
    I think, that method of doing business started a long time before Obama.


    The USA armed the Afghans in the 1980’s and they turned into al-Queda who in turn flew planes into the WTC.

    Of course the US not only negotiated with terrorists it sold them military hardware if it suited them at the time, so much for principals.:(

    The Iran–Contra affair (Persian: ایران-کنترا‎, Spanish: caso Irán-Contra), also referred to as Irangate, Contragate or the Iran–Contra scandal, was a political scandal in the United States that occurred during the second term of the Reagan Administration. Senior administration officials secretly facilitated the sale of arms to Iran, the subject of an arms embargo. Some U.S. officials also hoped that the arms sales would secure the release of several hostages and allow U.S. intelligence agencies to fund the Nicaraguan Contras. Under the Boland Amendment, further funding of the Contras by the government had been prohibited by Congress.

    The scandal began as an operation to free the seven American hostages being held in Lebanon by a group with Iranian ties connected to the Army of the Guardians of the Islamic Revolution. It was planned that Israel would ship weapons to Iran, and then the United States would resupply Israel and receive the Israeli payment. The Iranian recipients promised to do everything in their power to achieve the release of the U.S. hostages. The plan deteriorated into an arms-for-hostages scheme, in which members of the executive branch sold weapons to Iran in exchange for the release of the American hostages.Large modifications to the plan were devised by Lieutenant Colonel Oliver North of the National Security Council in late 1985, in which a portion of the proceeds from the weapon sales was diverted to fund anti-Sandinista and anti-communist rebels, or Contras, in Nicaragua.

    While President Ronald Reagan was a supporter of the Contra cause, the evidence is disputed as to whether he authorized the diversion of the money raised by the Iranian arms sales to the Contras.Handwritten notes taken by Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger on December 7, 1985, indicate that Reagan was aware of potential hostage transfers with Iran, as well as the sale of Hawk and TOW missiles to "moderate elements" within that country. Weinberger wrote that Reagan said "he could answer to charges of illegality but couldn't answer to the charge that 'big strong President Reagan passed up a chance to free the hostages'". After the weapon sales were revealed in November 1986, Reagan appeared on national television and stated that the weapons transfers had indeed occurred, but that the United States did not trade arms for hostages.The investigation was impeded when large volumes of documents relating to the scandal were destroyed or withheld from investigators by Reagan administration officials. On March 4, 1987, Reagan returned to the airwaves in a nationally televised address, taking full responsibility for any actions that he was unaware of, and admitting that "what began as a strategic opening to Iran deteriorated, in its implementation, into trading arms for hostages".

    Several investigations ensued, including those by the U.S. Congress and the three-person, Reagan-appointed Tower Commission. Neither found any evidence that President Reagan himself knew of the extent of the multiple programs. Ultimately the sale of weapons to Iran was not deemed a criminal offense but charges were brought against five individuals for their support of the Contras. Those charges, however, were later dropped because the administration refused to declassify certain documents. The indicted conspirators faced various lesser charges instead. In the end, fourteen administration officials were indicted, including then-Secretary of Defense Caspar Weinberger. Eleven convictions resulted, some of which were vacated on appeal. The rest of those indicted or convicted were all pardoned in the final days of the presidency of George H. W. Bush, who had been vice-president at the time of the affair.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iran–Contra_affair
     
  19. bradl macrumors 68040

    bradl

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    #19
    The Reagan administration had no such problem either.

    BL.
     
  20. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #20
    Mike, if you KNEW that YOU could not effectively track the guns YOU were about to give to the cartels, would YOU still give it to them?

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    ANYONE who arms the enemies/criminals should be in JAIL, REGARDLESS of party.
     
  21. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #21
    They thought they could, probably. They thought that if they gave names to the DA with evidence that they should be brought in ... they would be. It's likely unimaginable that a group of people would actually work against you when your goal is to try to protect them. :\
     
  22. Mousse, Aug 1, 2014
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2014

    Mousse macrumors 68000

    Mousse

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    #22
    [sarcasm]By the serial numbers on the gun, of course. It's not like anyone can just file off the serial numbers.:eek:[/sarcasm]

    I agree, it was a stupid plan that should have been shot down when they first brought up the idea. Even if they could track down the guns, what makes them think the gun will make it up the food chain to the upper echelons? Unless it's a solid gold Dessert Eagle with carved pearl hands or something else suitably gaudy, I don't see what interest a drug lord would have in it. He would just let his underlings use these guns to kill border patrol agents.
     
  23. jkcerda macrumors 6502

    jkcerda

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    #23

    patriot act
    NSA
    NDAA.

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    [​IMG]
     
  24. Michael Goff macrumors G4

    Michael Goff

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    #24
    So ... you list three things that are completely irrelevant to this discussion like it means something.
     
  25. lostngone thread starter macrumors demi-god

    lostngone

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    #25
    Yes, however if a few of my firearms were found in the possession of children or used in a crime I would have has to answer to why that was the case and I would most likely forfeit my Rights to own them.

    But the Government can lose 200,000+ and it doesn't look like anyone is even going to get fired over it or go to jail.
     

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